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Full text of "Graduate Programs Catalog"

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North Carolina 
State University 



explore, discover, become. 



GRADUATE 
PROGRAMS CATALOG 



2005-2007 



GRADUATE STUDIES 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/graduateprograms13nort 



ARCHIVES 

F. D. Bluford Library 

NCA&T State University 

Greensboro, NC 27411 



THE SCHOOL OF 
GRADUATE STUDIES 



GRADUATE CATALOG 



Volume 13, No. 1 

CATALOG OF NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL 

STATE UNIVERSITY - Published every two years by 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University 

1601 East Market Street 

120 Gibbs Hall 

Greensboro, North Carolina 2741 1 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

2005 - 2007 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

GENERAL INFORMATION 4 

MISSION, PURPOSE AND GOALS OF THE UNIVERSITY 4 

VISION 6 

AGGIE PRIDE COMPACT 7 

CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT 8 

ADMINISTRATION, North Carolina A&T State University 8 

DEANS OF COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 8 

COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, AND DIVISIONS 8 

ACCREDITATION AND INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIPS 9 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 11 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL ORGANIZATION 15 

GRADUATE ADMISSION 15 

Admission to Master's Degree Programs 17 

Admission to Doctoral Programs 18 

REGISTRATION AND RECORDS 21 

TUITION AND FEES 28 

IMMUNIZATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 34 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AND SCHOLARS OFFICE 36 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 38 

MAJOR RESEARCH CENTERS AND INSTITUTES 48 

TECHNOLOGY AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS (IT&T) SERVICES 51 

MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY AND COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 54 

Adult Education 214 

Agribusiness, Applied Economics and Agriscience Education 57 

Animal Sciences 68 

Architectural Engineering (Refer to Civil Engineering) 95 

Biology 72 

Chemical Engineering 79 

Chemistry 86 

Civil and Environmental Engineering 95 

Community/Agency Counseling 214 

Computational Science and Engineering 106 

Computer Science 113 

Construction Management and Occupational Safety and Health 122 

Counselor Education 214 

Curriculum and Instruction 129 

Electrical and Computer Engineering 142 

Electronics, Computer, and Information Technology 162 

Elementary Education 129 

2 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Energy and Environmental Studies 173 

English 179 

Food and Nutritional Sciences 234 

Graphic Communication Systems and Technological Studies 187 

History 208 

Human Development and Services 214 

Human Environment and Family Sciences 231 

Human Performance and Leisure Studies 204 

Human Resources Management 237 

Industrial and Systems Engineering 241 

Industrial Technology 198, 270 

Instructional Technology 129 

Leadership Studies 250 

Management Information Systems 256 

Manufacturing Systems 269 

Mathematics 260 

Mechanical Engineering 275 

Natural Resources and Environmental Design 289 

Physics 295 

Plant, Soil and Environmental Science 289 

Reading Education 129 

Rehabilitation Counseling 214 

School Administration 214 

Social Work 302 

Technology Education, Teaching 187 

Trade and Industrial Education, Teaching 187 

Training and Development for Industry 187 

Transportation and Logistics 310 

Workforce Development 187 

GRADUATE FACULTY 314 

School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences 314 

College of Arts and Sciences 316 

School of Business and Economics 320 

School of Education 329 

College of Engineering 324 

School of Technology 328 

ADMINISTRATION, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 333 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 333 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 334 

RESOURCES AND STUDENT SERVICES 333 

DRUG AND ALCOHOL EDUCATION POLICY 340 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

North Carolina Agricultural and 
Technical State University 

HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

Today, one of the nation's leading Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), 
North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is classified as a Carnegie doctoral/ 
research intensive university that is recognized as the top-producing university for African Ameri- 
can engineers and technologists. The University's programs have numerous accreditations in- 
cluding the first nationally accredited AACSB international accounting program in the nation 
among HBCUs. The university's history as one of only eighteen 1890 land-grant universities is 
well reflected in agriculture, animal science, environmental science, engineering, and technol- 
ogy programs, and a growing student enrollment is a further reflection of the demands for the 
North Carolina A&T's programs in education, nursing, and arts and sciences. North Carolina 
A&T also has a rich civil rights legacy, and its students, especially the Greensboro Four who are 
credited with beginning the sit-in movement, played a prominent role in the 1960s. 

Today's university has changed a great deal from the Agricultural and Mechanical College 
for the "Colored Race" established by an act of the General Assembly of North Carolina rati- 
fied on March 9, 1891. The College actually began operation during the school year of 1890- 
91, before the passage of the state law creating it. 

The scope of degree programs has been expanded to meet new demands. The first graduate 
degree was approved when the General Assembly authorized the institution to grant the Master 
of Science degree in education and certain other fields in 1939. The first Master's degree was 
awarded in 1941. 

In 1957 the General Assembly repealed previous acts describing the purpose of the Col- 
lege and redefined its purpose "to teach the Agricultural and Technical Arts and Sciences " and 
added a heavy emphasis to strengthening its efforts to train "teachers, supervisors, and admin- 
istrators for the public schools of the State " especially preparing them to earn the Master's 
degree. 

North Carolina's General Assembly voted to elevate the College to the status of a Regional 
University effective July 1, 1967. On October 30, 1971, the General Assembly ratified an Act 
to consolidate the Institutions of Higher Learning in North Carolina. Under the provisions of 
this Act, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University became a constituent 
institution of The University of North Carolina effective July 1, 1972. 

Nine presidents/chancellors have served North Carolina A&T since it was founded in 1 89 1 . 
They are: Dr. J. O. Crosby (1892-1896), Dr. James B. Dudley (1896-1925), Dr. F. D. Bluford 
(1925-1955), Dr. Warmoth T. Gibbs (1956-1960), Dr. Samuel DeWitt Proctor (1960-1964), 
Dr. Lewis C. Dowdy (1964-1980), Dr. Cleon F. Thompson (Interim Chancellor- 1980-1981), 
Dr. Edward B. Fort (1981-1999), and Dr. James C. Renick (1999-Present). 

MISSION, PURPOSE AND GOALS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Mission Statement 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is a public, doctoral/research 
intensive, land-grant university committed to fulfilling its fundamental purposes through ex- 
emplary undergraduate and graduate instruction, scholarly and creative research, and effective 
public service. The university offers degree programs at the baccalaureate, master's and 
doctoral levels with emphasis on agriculture, engineering, science, technology, literature and 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



other academic areas. As one of North Carolina's three engineering colleges, the university 
offers Ph.D. programs in engineering. Basic and applied research is conducted by faculty in 
university centers of excellence, in interinstitutional relationships, and through significant in- 
volvement with several public and private agencies. The university also conducts major re- 
search through engineering, transportation, and its extension programs in agriculture. 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University aspires to be the premier inter- 
disciplinary-centered university in America that builds on its comparative advantages in engi- 
neering, technology, and business; a strong civil rights legacy; and status as an 1890 land-grant 
institution. The challenges of preparing our students to meet the complex needs of the global 
society necessitate that these exemplary and relevant educational experiences are inherently 
global in nature and interdisciplinary in focus. The commitment to excellence and the unique 
NCA&TSU legacy of nurturing the individual student remain strong. 

The University's evolution toward interdisciplinarity responds to societal and intellectual 
issues that require new solutions. Cross-functional teams with expertise from a variety of dis- 
ciplines and perspectives are the best hope for the solution of complex modern challenges. As 
new problem-solving methods are needed, new disciplines are created at the intersection of old 
ones. Students are enthusiastic about courses that link learning to contemporary issues. An 
interdisciplinary education provides students with not only essential knowledge, but also con- 
nections across the disciplines, and finally, the ability to apply knowledge to life beyond the 
campus. 

Interdisciplinary studies build upon disciplinary excellence while inspiring new possibili- 
ties beyond the strengths of traditional fields of study. This model provides a focus for curricu- 
lum innovation, fosters communication across disciplines, and promotes partnerships with public 
and private entities. This University creates a learning environment in which opportunities to 
build solutions are based on expertise in more than one discipline. Teaching focuses more on 
the ability to organize, assess, apply, and create interdisciplinary knowledge rather than the 
transmission of existing knowledge to students. 

The teaching and learning process involves not only a commitment to knowledge and 
research, but also appreciates the influences of diverse thoughts, values, processes, resources, 
and structures as it seeks to organize and plan lifelong learning experiences. High expectations 
are supported by an infrastructure that facilitates the opportunity for constituents within the 
University to achieve and excel individually and collectively. Opportunities for learning are 
enhanced by varied methods of instruction, 24-hour availability, and through partnerships that 
are collaborative and cooperative. 

To be productive citizens of the 21st century, our students must be globally informed. 
Thus, current efforts to globalize the curriculum will continue. In addition, students will have 
the opportunity to enhance their undergraduate education by taking part in overseas study, 
internships, or service learning experiences. Some- may even earn a certificate in international 
studies. Likewise, international partnerships enhance interdisciplinary efforts and provide new 
opportunities for faculty and students to participate in and contribute to global change. The 
University exists for a society that is committed to research, knowledge and service to human- 
kind. The physical space for learning is not to be limited to a specific site, but deliverable in a 
variety of locations with a multiplicity of available resources. 

The interdisciplinary-centered university envisions its role to serve the needs of individu- 
als and groups who seek continuous opportunities for intellectual stimulation and growth. Uti- 
lizing the traditional disciplines and technological resources, this University fosters excellence 
in communication, enhances critical thinking, conducts research, and transmits new knowl- 
edge to a community that seeks to improve the quality of life for all in the 21st century. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



To realize the promise of the interdisciplinary-centered university, North Carolina A&T 
must initiate and nurture strategic partnerships, while concurrently enhancing and diversifying 
its resource base. 

VISION 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is a learner-centered commu- 
nity that develops and preserves intellectual capital through interdisciplinary learning, discov- 
ery, engagement, and operational excellence. 

Eager to build upon the University's solid foundation of academic programs, the faculty, 
staff, and students endorsed the Futures vision emphasizing the University's recognition for 
interdisciplinary programs that will prepare students to be globally competitive. A set of five 
goals set the course for enhancing the culture of accountability to high standards in all aca- 
demic programs and campus operations and through engagement with alumni, the community, 
business, industry and government. The five goals include: 

Goal One: Establish and ensure an interdisciplinary focus for North Carolina A&T that man- 
dates overall high quality, continued competitiveness, and effective involvement 
of global strategic partners in marketing and delivery of programs and operations. 

Goal Two: Deliver visionary and distinctive interdisciplinary learning, discovery, and en- 
gagement that include collaborations and partnerships as part of the learning 
experience. 

Goal Three: Foster a responsive learning environment that utilizes an efficiently integrated 
administrative support system for high quality programs, research and collegial 
interactions, and effectively disseminates consistent information to University 
stakeholders. 

Goal Four: Provides superior: readily available student services and programs that recog- 
nize and respond to diverse student needs. 

Goal Five: Enhance and diversify the University's resource base through effective fund- 
raising, entrepreneurial initiatives, enhanced facilities, and sponsored research 
programs. 

NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY AND INTEGRATION STATEMENT 

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY is 
committed to equality of educational opportunity and does not discriminate against applicants, 
students, or employees based on race, color, national origin, religion, gender, age, or disability. 
Moreover, NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVER- 
SITY is open to people of all races and actively seeks to promote racial integration by recruit- 
ing and enrolling a larger number of white students. 

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 
supports the protections available to members of its community under all applicable Federal 
laws, including Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education 
Amendments of 1972, Sections 799 A and 845 of the Public Health Service Act, the Equal Pay 
and Age Discrimination Acts, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Executive Order 1 1246. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



AGGIE PRIDE COMPACT 

Achieving Great Goals In Everything - Producing Renowned Individuals Dedicated To 
Excellence 

The essence of Aggie Pride is manifested in standards depicting what it truly means to be 
a responsible member of The North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University Fam- 
ily. These standards provide the impetus and inspiration, which motivate students, faculty, 
staff, administrators, and trustees alike in their perpetual commitment to excellence. North 
Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University has a unique legacy of nurturing indi- 
vidual students to realize their fullest potential. 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is a learner-centered commu- 
nity that develops and preserves intellectual capital through interdisciplinary learning, discov- 
ery, engagement, and operational excellence. As members of the university community, all 
stakeholders share a pervasive sense of trust, pride, and allegiance in ensuring the preeminent 
status of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University in a global society. The 
following standards define the essence of Aggie Pride: 

Aggie Pride is consistently communicating and behaving in a manner that displays integrity, 
honesty, sound character, and virtuous ethics. (Values) 

Aggie Pride is expecting and achieving success and setting high standards in all personal and 
professional ventures. (Achievement) 

Aggie Pride is taking a personal stand to positively affect the continuous growth, development 
and enhancement of the University at large. (Commitment) 

Aggie Pride is accepting and demonstrating a steadfast commitment to learning by taking 
responsibility through personal and professional development. (Self-determination) 

Aggie Pride is striving to significantly influence the development of individuals of all ages 
within and beyond our community to become lifelong learners. (Lifelong Learning) 

Aggie Pride is exhibiting a positive and willing attitude to unselfishly serve and to pledge ones 
talents and gifts for the betterment of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University 
and the larger world community. (Service) 

Aggie Pride is contributing to the establishment and maintenance of a safe, clean, and 
aesthetically appealing campus with a favorable ecosystem. (Building Community) 

Aggie Pride is exhibiting a relentless desire and commitment to treat all individuals with a high 
level of appreciation and respect and to expect the same in return. (Respect) 

Aggie Pride is effectively representing the University by utilizing personal knowledge, skills, 
and resources. (Confidence) 

Aggie Pride builds on the past, maintains the present, and accepts the challenges of the 
future while providing our personal financial resources to preserve our legacy and ensure our 
future. (Legacy) 

Therefore, as a member of the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 
University family, I unconditionally accept the obligation entrusted to me to live my life 
according to the standards set forth in this Compact. By my words and actions, I commit 
to Aggie Pride and the pursuit of excellence for myself and for my University. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT 

Students enrolled at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University are expected 
to conduct themselves properly at all times. They are expected to observe standards of behavior 
and integrity that will reflect favorably upon themselves, their families, and the University. 
They are expected to abide by the laws of the city, state, and nation, and by all rules and 
regulations of the University. 

Accordingly, any student who demonstrates an unwillingness to adjust to the rules and 
regulations that are prescribed or that may be prescribed to govern the student body will be 
placed on probation, suspended, or expelled from the institution. 

A student may forfeit the privilege of working for the University when, for any reason, he 
or she is placed on probation because of misconduct. The policies and procedures governing 
students' conduct are located in the Student Handbook which is distributed annually. 

ADMINISTRATION, North Carolina A&T State University 

James C. Renick, Chancellor 
Carolyn W. Meyers, Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

Willie T. Ellis, Jr., Vice Chancellor for Business and Finance 

Rodney E. Harrigan, Vice Chancellor for Information Technology and 

Telecommunications/CIO 

David W. Hoard, Vice Chancellor for Development and University Relations 

N. Radhakrishnan, Vice Chancellor for Research and Economic Development 

Roselle L. Wilson, Interim Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 

Colleen P. Grotsky, Executive Assistant to the Chancellor 

Camille Kluttz-Leach, Special Assistant to the Chancellor for Legal Affairs 

DEANS OF COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

Alton Thompson, Dean, School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences 

Michael A. Plater, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 

Quiester Craig, Dean, School of Business and Economics 

Lelia Vickers, Dean, School of Education 

Joseph Monroe, Dean, College of Engineering 

Kenneth H. Murray, Dean, School of Graduate Studies 

Patricia Price-Lea, Dean, School of Nursing 

Earnest Walker, Interim Dean, School of Technology 

COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, AND DIVISIONS OF NORTH CAROLINA 
AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 

North Carolina Agricultural and. Technical State University includes the following col- 
leges, schools, and divisions: The School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, The 
College of Arts and Sciences, The School of Business and Economics, The School of Educa- 
tion, The School of Technology, The College of Engineering, The School of Nursing, The 
School of Graduate Studies, and The Division of Continuing Education and Summer School. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



ACCREDITATION AND INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIPS 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is accredited by the Commis- 
sion on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, 
Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097: Telephone number 404-679-4501) to award the bachelor's, 
master's, and doctoral degrees. 

The program of Industrial Technology is accredited by the National Association of Industrial 
Technology. 

The Media Program is accredited by the Association of Educational Communications and 
Technology. 

The Teacher Education Programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation 
of Teacher Education. 

The Department of Chemistry is accredited by the American Chemical Society. 

The Social Work Programs of the Department of Sociology and Social Work are accredited 
by the Council on Social Work Education. 

The Department of Home Economics is accredited by The American Home Economics 
Association. 

The University holds institutional membership in the following associations: 

American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education 

American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers 

National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges 

American College of Public Relations Association 

American Council for Construction Education 

Associated Schools of Construction 

American Council on Education 

American Public Welfare Association 

American Library Association 

Association of American Colleges 

Association of Collegiate Deans and Registrars 

Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture 

American Personnel and Guidance Association 

The Council of Graduate Schools 

National Association of Industrial Technology, International Association of 
Technology Education 

National Association of Student Personnel Association 

Association of College Unions International 

National Association of College and University Food Service 

National Commission on Accrediting 

National Institutional Teacher Placement Association 

North Carolina Association of Colleges and Universities 

North Carolina Library Association 

National Association of College and University Business Officers 

National Association of Business Teacher Education 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



American Personnel and Guidance Association 

National Association of Industrial Technology, International Association of 
Technology 

Education, and the American Driver and Traffic Safety Education Association 

National Association of Student Personnel Administrators 

Association of College Unions International 

National Association of College and University Food Service 

National Commission on Accrediting 

National Institutional Teacher Placement Association 

Southeastern Library Association 

Graduates of the University are eligible for membership in the American Association of 
University Women. 



10 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

NOTE: This calendar is subject to periodic revision. Please check with the University Registrar 
to determine if changes have been made, or visit our website at www.ncat.edu. 
North Carolina A&T State University 
2005-2006 Academic Calendar 

FALL SEMESTER 2005 



August 2 - Tuesday 


Tuition, Fees, Room and Board due 


August 1 1 - Thursday 


Faculty Institute - Faculty Report 


August 12 -Friday 


Graduate Teaching Assistant Training 


August 12-13 Friday and Saturday 


New Students Report for Fall 

(Residence Halls open 9:00 a jn. - 3:00 pan.) 


August 14 - Sunday 


CONTINUING STUDENTS REPORT 
(Residence Halls open 9:00 a an. - 3:00 pjn.) 


August 14-16 Sunday - Tuesday 


Welcome Program for New Students and Transfer Students 


August 1 5 - Monday 


Registration for Continuing Students 
Graduate Student Orientation 


August 1 7 - Wednesday 


CLASSES BEGIN 

LATE REGISTRATION BEGINS ($20.00 late fee) 


August 19 -Friday 


Deadline for PBS Certification Admission Applications 


August 24 - Wednesday 


LAST DAY TO ADD or AUDIT A COURSE 

LAST DAY TO DROP AND RECEIVE FINANCIAL 

CREDIT 

LAST DAY TO APPLY FOR FALL GRADUATION 

LATE REGISTRATION ENDS (includes tuition waivers) 

Last Day to Submit Tuition Waivers 

LAST DAY TO RECEIVE BOOK ALLOWANCE 


September 5 - Monday 


UNIVERSITY HOLIDAY (Labor Day) 


September 16 - Friday 


Grade Evaluation for Student Athletes 


September 16-18 Friday - Sunday 


NC A&T SU Family Weekend (NC A&T vs Hampton 
University) 


September 26 - Monday 


Deadline to remove Incomplete(s) received Spring and 
Summer 2005 


October 7 - Friday 


Mid-Term Grades due 


October 1 3 - Thursday 


Founder's Day (Classes Suspended 10 am - 12 noon) 


October 15 - Saturday 


Homecoming 


October 17-18 Monday - Tuesday 


FALL BREAK 


October TBA 


Fall Open House for Transfer/ Adult Students 


October 29 - Saturday 


University Day 


Oct. 3 1 - Nov. 4 Monday - Friday 


Final Comprehensive Exam Week (Graduate Students) 


October 28 - Friday 


Deadline to apply for Waste Management Certificates 
Deadline to apply for Certificate in Entrepreneurship 


November 1 - Tuesday 


Deadline for Graduate/Doctoral/International admission 
applications for Spring 2006 


November 2 - Wednesday 


Last Day to Drop a Course Without Course Evaluation 


November 4 - Friday 


Last Day to Defend Thesis/Dissertation 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



II 



November 7 - Monday 


Defended and approved Theses/Dissertations Due in 
Graduate School Office 


November 7 Monday - Friday 


ADVISEMENT AND REGISTRATION for Spring 2006 


November 8 - Tuesday 


LAST DAY TO WITHDRAW FROM THE UNIVERSITY 
WITHOUT GRADE EVALUATION 


November 1 1 - Friday 


Grade evaluations for Student Athletes 


November 23 - Wednesday 


THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY begins at 7:00 am. 


November 28 - Monday 


THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY ends at 7:00 a.m. 
Thesis/Dissertation print copies for binding due in Graduate 
School Office 


December 1 - Thursday 


Applications for Spring Semester 
Admission to the University Due 


December 7 - Wednesday 


CLASSES END 


December 8 - Thursday 


READING DAY 


December 9-15 Friday - Thursday 


FINAL EXAMS 


December 16 - Friday 


Residence Halls close for Non-graduating 

Students at 12:00 noon 

Grades due by 3:00 p.m. 

Waste Management Certificate Ceremony 


December 17 - Saturday 


COMMENCEMENT 

Residence Halls close for graduating seniors at 7:00 p jn. 



SPRING 2006 



January 3, 2006 


New Year's Resolution Party 


January 5 - Thursday 


Residence Halls open 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. 
New Students In Residence Halls Report 
Registration for Continuing Students 
Faculty Report 


January 5-6 Thurs. and Friday 


Orientation, Advisement and Registration for New Students 
(Tuition, Fees, Room and Board due 8:30 a on. - 2:00 pan.) 


January 5 - Thursday 


Graduate Student Orientation 


January 6 - Friday 


Graduate Teaching Assistants Training 


January 9 - Monday 


CLASSES BEGIN 

LATE REGISTRATION BEGINS ($20.00 late fee) 


January 13 -Friday 


Deadline For PBS Certification Admissions Application 


January 1 3 - Friday 


LAST DAY TO ADD or AUDIT A COURSE 

LAST DAY TO DROP AND RECEIVE FINANCIAL CREDIT 

LAST DAY TO APPLY FOR SPRING GRADUATION 
(Both Undergraduate and Graduate Students) 
LAST DAY TO RECErVE BOOK ALLOWANCE 
LATE REGISTRATION ENDS 
Last Day to Submit Tuition Waivers 


January 16 -Monday 


UNIVERSITY HOLIDAY (Martin Luther King, Jr.) 


January 27 - Friday 


Ronald E. McNair Memorial Day (classes are not cancelled) 


February 1 -Wednesday 


Grade Evaluation For Student Athletes 


February 17 - Friday 


Deadline to Remove Incomplete(s) received Fall 2005 


February 28 - Tuesday 


Deadline to apply for Certificate in Entrepreneurship 
Deadline to apply for Waste Management Certificates 



12 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



March 2 - Thursday 


Mid-term grades due 


March 4 - Saturday 


Residence Halls close 1:00p.m. 


March 6-10 Mon. - Fri. 


SPRING BREAK 


March 10-14 


Final Comprehensive Exam Week (Graduate Students) 


March 12 -Sunday 


Residence Halls re-open 9:00 a.m. 


March 23 - Thursday 


HONOR'S CONVOCATION 

(Classes are suspended from 3 - 5:00 pm) 


March 28 - Tuesday 


LAST DAY TO DROP A COURSE WITHOUT GRADE 
EVALUATION 


April 1-7 Saturday - Friday 


Graduate Student Appreciation Week 


April 1 - Saturday 


Deadline for Graduate Admission Applications for 
HDSV - Counseling Program for Fall 2006 

Deadline for Graduate/Doctoral/International admission 
applications for Fall 2006 


April 3 


ADVISEMENT AND REGISTRATION For Fall 2006 

Early Summer School Registration 


April 7 - Friday 


Last Day to Defend Thesis/Dissertation 


April 10 - Monday 


Defended and Approved Thesis/Dissertation due in Graduate 
School Office 


April 11 -Tuesday 


Last Day to Withdraw from the University without a 
Grade Evaluation 


April 14 - Friday 


University Holiday - Good Friday 


April 18 -Tuesday 


Grade Evaluation for Student Athletes 


April 28 - Friday 


Thesis/Dissertation print copies for binding due in 
Graduate School Office 


May 2 - Tuesday 


CLASSES END 


May 3 - Wednesday 


READING DAY 


May 4-10 Thurs. - Weds. 


FINAL EXAMS 


May 1 1 - Thursday 


Residence Halls Close for Non-graduating Students at 
12:00 noon 


May 12 -Friday 


Waste Management Certificate Ceremony 
Grades due by 3:00 pan. 


May 13 - Saturday 


COMMENCEMENT 

Residence Halls close for graduating seniors at 7:00 p.m. 
Academic Year Ends 


May 22 - Monday 


First and Dual Summer Sessions begin 


June (TBA) 


Summer Open House - Transfer/ Adult Students 


June 8-9 (Thurs. - Fri.) 


New Freshmen and Transfer Students Summer Orientation 


June 12-13 (Mon. -Tues.) 


New Freshmen and Transfer Students Summer Orientation 


June 15-16 (Thurs. - Fri.) 


New Freshmen and Transfer Students Summer Orientation 


June 21-22 (Weds. - Thurs.) 


New Freshmen and Transfer Students Summer Orientation 


June 23 (Friday) 


Commuter and Weekend Student Summer Orientation 


June 27-28 (Tues. - Weds.) 


New Freshmen and Transfer Students Summer Orientation 



Disclaimer: Please note that the academic calendar is subject to change. Please consult with the University 
regarding dates. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



13 



THE SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

Graduate education at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University was 
authorized by the North Carolina State Legislature in 1939. The authorization provided for 
training in agriculture, technology, applied sciences, and other approved areas of study. An 
extension of the graduate program approved by the General Assembly of North Carolina in 
1957 provided for enlargement of the curriculum to include teacher education, as well as such 
other programs of a professional or occupational nature as might be approved by the North 
Carolina Board of Higher Education. 

On July 1 , 1967, the Legislature of North Carolina approved regional university status for 
the institution and renamed it North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. The 
University awarded its first master's degree in 1941 to Woodland Ellroy Hall. Since that time, 
nearly 6,700 students have received this coveted degree of advanced studies. A significant 
number of these graduates have gone on to other universities to achieve the prestigious doc- 
toral degree in their chosen disciplines. In recent years, a number of students who received 
their master's degree from A&T remained at A&T to earn a doctoral degree from A&T's Col- 
lege of Engineering. 

The School of Graduate Studies has an integrated and intercultural faculty and student 
body and beckons students from all over the world. It coordinates and administers advanced 
course offerings in departments within the School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, 
the College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Business and Economics, the School of Educa- 
tion, the College of Engineering, and the School of Technology. The School of Graduate Stud- 
ies offers advanced study for qualified individuals who wish to improve their competency for 
careers in professions related to agriculture, humanities, education, science, and technology. 
Such study of information, techniques, and skills is provided through curricula leading to the 
Master of Science, the Master of Arts, the Master of Education, Master of Social Work, Master 
of Science in Industrial Technology or the Doctor of Philosophy degree and through institutes 
and workshops designed for those who are not candidates for a higher degree. 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University heralds the new frontier of higher 
education with three new interdisciplinary graduate programs. The new interdisciplinary pro- 
grams offered are a master of science in Computational Science and Engineering and two Ph.D. 
Programs: Energy and Environmental Studies and Leadership Studies. These merged disciplines 
offer students an unparalleled opportunity for specialization in the areas of leadership, econom- 
ics, environment, engineering and technology. Students will undertake rigorous research and 
internships while enjoying a close interaction with scientists, engineers and professionals in 
other fields. The interdisciplinary programs present graduate students with the unique opportu- 
nity to draw expertise and resources from various disciplines across the university. 

The School of Graduate Studies provides a foundation of knowledge and techniques for 
those who wish to continue their education in doctoral programs at other institutions or within 
this institution as it expands into the doctoral arena. While studying at this university, it is 
expected that graduate students (1) will acquire special competence in one or multiple fields of 
knowledge; (2) will further develop their ability to think independently and constructively; (3) 
will develop and demonstrate the ability to collect, organize, evaluate, create, and report facts 
that will enable them to make a scholarly contribution to knowledge about their discipline; and 
(4) will make new application and adaptation of existing knowledge so as to contribute to their 
professions and to humankind. 

Eleven persons have served as dean of the School of Graduate Studies since its beginning 
in 1939. They are Dr. Wadaran L. Kennedy (1939-1951), Dr. Frederick A. Williams (1951- 
1 96 1 ), Dr. George C . Roy al ( 1 96 1 - 1 965) , Mr. J . Niel Armstrong ( 1 965 - 1 966) , Dr. Darwin Turner 
(1966-1969), Dr. Albert W. Spruill (1970-1993), Dr. Meada Gibbs (1993-1996), Dr. Charles 



14 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Williams (1996-1997), Dr. Melvin N. Johnson (1997), Dr. Thoyd Melton (1998-2000), and Dr. 
Kenneth H. Murray (2000-Present). 

ORGANIZATION 

School of Graduate Studies Council 

The School of Graduate Studies Council is responsible for formulating all academic poli- 
cies and regulations affecting graduate students, graduate courses, and graduate curricula. The 
council consists of faculty, students and administrative representatives from graduate programs. 
The Dean of the School of Graduate Studies serves as chairperson of the Council. 

GRADUATE ADMISSION 

Applications for admission must be accompanied by the following: two official transcripts 
from all colleges and universities previously attended including NCA&TSU; references from 
at least three people who know of the student's academic record and potential for graduate 
study; a non-refundable application fee of $45; and, in most cases, an official statement of the 
student's Graduate Record Examination or other standardized test scores. Some departments 
may require a letter of intent. An application and reference forms may be obtained by visiting 
the Website at http://www.ncat.edu/~gradsch/ or by writing or visiting North Carolina A&T 
State University, School of Graduate Studies, 120 Gibbs Hall, Greensboro, NC, 27411-3210. 
When completed, all application materials should be returned according to instructions. Stu- 
dents who choose not to enroll for the semester in which they are applying may request in 
writing to defer their application and supporting documents for up to one year. After one year, 
all documents will be shredded and prospective students are required to complete the applica- 
tion process again, including application fee. 

Required Application Material 

The admission process is designed to collect credentials that will help determine which 
applicants have the academic preparation, intellectual ability, experience, and motivation to 
undertake a rigorous program of study. The application materials for each prospective student 
receive individual attention and thorough review by the intended program committee. In addi- 
tion to the application form and application fee, the following official documents must be 
submitted before an application can be considered complete and submitted for evaluation by 
the intended program. All materials submitted as part of an application becomes a part of 
the University's official record and cannot be returned to the student, nor can it be 
forwarded to a third party. 

Letters of Recommendation 

Three letters of recommendation from persons qualified to evaluate your academic and 
professional qualifications are required. You should request recommendations from individu- 
als who are familiar with your academic achievement and potential. If you have been out of 
school for a number of years and are unable to contact your professors, letters from other 
individuals who can address your achievement and potential will be accepted. Please carefully 
complete the top section of the enclosed letter of recommendation forms before giving it to the 
person you have selected to complete the evaluation. The recommendations should be returned 
to you in a sealed envelope. Although it is extremely helpful if these letters are sent with the 
program material, recommendation letters can be mailed separately. Please inform the person 
completing your recommendation of the appropriate application deadline so that they can 
submit the recommendation before the application deadline date. Note the "waiver of right to 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 1 5 



inspect" statement on these forms; you may or may not elect to sign the waiver. If you elect to 
sign the waiver, or do not respond at all, the contents of the reference will not be available for 
you to inspect. Inspection of the reference letter only refers to viewing the recommendation 
letter. As stated above, all material submitted as part of an application becomes a part of 
the University's official record and cannot be returned to the student, nor can it be for- 
warded to a third party. 

Transcripts 

Two official transcripts of all post-secondary (after high school) education, bearing the 
signature of the registrar and the seal of the institution, should be sent to the School of Gradu- 
ate Studies in a sealed envelope. Transcripts that bear the statement "Issued to Student," or that 
do not arrive in sealed envelopes, are not considered official. The School of Graduate Studies 
prefers that applicants submit official transcripts with their application. However, if an 
institution's registrar will only send transcripts directly to another institution, the School of 
Graduate Studies will accept and process transcripts separately. Do not send transcripts di- 
rectly to the intended program. To prevent delays in review of an application, you should re- 
quest transcripts before mid-year grades are posted. However, you are still responsible for 
ensuring that a final transcript is received, showing award of the degree. Transcripts submitted 
to the School of Graduate Studies become part of the permanent record and cannot be released 
to another institution, employer, or to the student. 

Standardized Test Scores (GRE, GMAT, etc.) 

Current (no more than five years old) standardized test scores, usually GRE General Test, 
are required for most programs. 

The School of Graduate Studies' accreditation requires that official reports (reported di- 
rectly from ETS) of all required standardized test scores be submitted as part of the application. 
While photocopies of score reports will be accepted for informal evaluation, an official agency 
report of all required scores must follow. GRE, GMAT, and MAT scores are reportable for a 
period of five years from the date of the exam. Test scores of students who apply and decide not 
to enroll in graduate studies at North Carolina A&T State University are maintained for one year. 

Supplemental (Program-Specific) Application Material 

Many programs require statements of purpose, supplemental applications, essays, portfo- 
lios, etc. Please check with the intended program regarding their requirements, before submit- 
ting your application. An application cannot be considered complete until all required material 
are submitted. 

Because of processing requirements, an admission decision for fall semester cannot be 
guaranteed unless all credentials are received by July 1, for spring semester by November 1, 
and for summer sessions by April 1 . International students should refer to the deadlines for 
international students. 

International Students 

International students are required to meet all of the above requirements in addition to 
those listed below. The application and all supporting documents should be filed as early as 
possible to allow sufficient time for processing by both the academic program and the Gradu- 
ate School. The Graduate School encourages international students to submit the application 
and all supporting documents no later than April 1 for Fall admission and by September 1 for 
Spring admission. Applicants interested in Summer Sessions must contact the International 
Students and Scholars Office. 



16 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



English Proficiency 

Students whose native language is other than English, regardless of citizenship, must sub- 
mit official TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) scores issued by the Educational 
Testing Service as evidence of ability to use English at a level of competence sufficient for 
graduate work. The minimum requirement for admission is a TOEFL score of 550 or better 
(213 computer-based score), with scores of 50 on at least two of the sections and no section 
score below 45. (The minimum score is subject to change; departments may establish a higher 
minimum requirement.) The TOEFL test date must be within 24 months of the application 
deadline date before the semester for which the application is being reviewed. 

Academic International Transcripts 

Official academic transcripts from all international universities are required to be submit- 
ted, along with a certified English translation and a course by course transcript evaluation 
completed and forwarded by an external agency directly to the School of Graduate Studies, 
120 Gibbs Hall, North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro, NC 2741 1 . North Carolina 
A&T State University recognizes the following transcript evaluation agencies: Educational 
Credential Evaluators, Inc. ( www.ece.org ) and World Education Services (www.wes.org). Evalu- 
ations completed by other agencies may not be recognized and accepted by the School of 
Graduate Studies. Official academic transcripts must bear the signature of the registrar or other 
academic official, and the official seal of the issuing institution. Students must hold the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, or its equivalent, based on a four-year curriculum. 
Transcripts submitted to the School of Graduate Studies become part of the permanent record 
and cannot be released to another institution, employer, or to the student. 

Financial Verification 

The international applicant must also provide the University with verification that the 
required funds are available to support the proposed program of advanced study. Foreign na- 
tionals in the United States at the time application is made must also provide information re- 
garding their current visa status. The University provides special forms to be used by the applicant 
in supplying this information. For information concerning visa, United States immigration, or 
the Financial Certificate, contact the Office of International Students and Scholars at (336) 
334-7551. 

ADMISSION TO MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The procedures followed in evaluating an applicant's potential for success in graduate 
work and the criteria used for admission decisions vary according to programs and colleges/ 
schools and reflect an evaluation of the applicant's potential to engage in graduate work and 
the capability of the individual programs to accommodate additional students. Generally, re- 
quests for admission are considered by departmental admissions committees, which forward 
the departmental recommendations to the dean of Graduate Studies. Students denied admis- 
sion to one academic program must re-apply for admissions to be considered by another aca- 
demic department. 

Students are admitted to full or provisional status in a specific degree program. Admission 
is granted for a specific semester or summer term. Any change in the admission date must be 
requested in writing and approved by the department and School of Graduate Studies. Once the 
academic requirements for that degree program have been completed, no further registration as 
a graduate student will be permitted unless admission to a new graduate classification has been 
formally approved. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 1 7 



Admission to Degree Programs 

Applicants to a master's degree program for graduate study must have earned a bachelor's 
degree from a nationally accredited four-year college. Application forms must be submitted to 
the School of Graduate Studies with two official transcripts of all previous undergraduate and 
graduate studies, and three letters of recommendation. Applicants may be admitted to graduate 
studies unconditionally, provisionally, or as a non-degree seeking post-baccalaureate studies 
(PBS) student. Applicants are admitted without discrimination because of race, color, creed, or 
gender. Transcripts submitted to the School of Graduate Studies become part of the permanent 
record and cannot be released to another institution, employer, or to the student. 

Unconditional Admission 

To qualify for unconditional admission to a master's degree program for graduate study, 
an applicant must have earned an overall average of 2.6 on a 4 point system (or 1 .6 on a 3 point 
system) in his/her undergraduate studies. Some programs require a 3.0 grade point average on 
a 4.0 scale; therefore, applicants should check appropriate sections of the Graduate Catalog to 
ascertain the minimum grade point average required. In addition, a student seeking a degree in 
Agricultural Education, Elementary Education, Technology Education, or Secondary Educa- 
tion must possess, or be qualified to possess, a Class A Teaching License in the area in which 
he/she wishes to concentrate. See certification exception for Vocational-Industrial Education 
(post-secondary /private industry) . 

Provisional Admission 

An applicant may be admitted to the master's degree program for graduate study on a 
provisional basis if (1) the earned baccalaureate degree is from a non-accredited institution, (2) 
the record of undergraduate preparation reveals deficiencies that can be removed near the be- 
ginning of graduate study and/or (3) final documents are still needed. A student admitted pro- 
visionally may be required to pass examinations to demonstrate his/her knowledge in specified 
areas, to take specified undergraduate courses to improve his/her background, or to demon- 
strate his/her competence for graduate work by earning no grades below "B" in the first nine 
hours of graduate work at this institution. 

Post-Baccalaureate Studies (PBS) 

Students not seeking to be admitted to a graduate program at A&T may be allowed to take 
courses for self-improvement or for renewal of teaching certificate if said students meet the 
School of Graduate Studies entrance requirements. If a student subsequently wishes to pursue 
a degree program, he/she must complete the full admission process. The School of Graduate 
Studies reserves the right to refuse to accept towards a degree program credits which the can- 
didate earned while enrolled as a PBS student; in no circumstances may the student apply 
towards a degree program more than twelve semester hours earned as a PBS student. In addi- 
tion, some academic departments restrict their courses to degree- seeking students only. 

ADMISSION TO DOCTORAL PROGRAMS 

Applicants to doctoral programs in Electrical Engineering, Energy and Environmental 
Studies, Industrial and Systems Engineering, Leadership Studies and Mechanical Engineering 
must submit completed application forms with two official transcripts of previous undergradu- 
ate and graduate studies and an official copy of their GRE/GMAT test scores. Other admission 
criteria are outlined below under the following headings: unconditional admission and provi- 
sional admission. Transcripts submitted to the School of Graduate Studies become part of the 
permanent record and cannot be released to another institution, employer, or to the student. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Early application is encouraged, particularly if the applicant wishes to be considered for 
an assistantship. 

Unconditional Admission 

Unconditional admission is offered to applicants who satisfy all general School of Gradu- 
ate Studies requirements. Applicants must have earned a Bachelor's and Master's Degree in 
the appropriate discipline. In addition, they must have received a 3.5 grade point average in 
their Master's level work. Graduate Record Examination scores are required. Test of English as 
a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores are required for international students. 

Provisional Admission 

Provisional admission is offered to applicants who meet all conditions except the 3.5 grade 
point average in the Master's degree. Provisional students must convert to unconditional ad- 
mission on a timely basis by achieving a 3.5 average on graduate coursework when the ninth 
credit is completed. 

JOINT DOCTORAL PROGRAM WITH 
INDIANA STATE UNIVERSITY 

North Carolina A&T State University School of Technology and Indiana State University 
School of Technology offers a joint doctor of philosophy consortium degree program in Tech- 
nology. The specializations, program requirements, and admission requirements are listed below. 

Specializations are: 

• Construction Management 

• Digital Communications 

• Human Resource Development and Training 

• Manufacturing Systems 

• Quality Systems 

Program Requirements 

The Ph.D. in Technology Management consists of a minimum of 90 hours of course work 
and research at the post-baccalaureate level. Included is course work in a general technology 
core, a research core, a technical specialization, an internship, a residency requirement, and a 
dissertation. 

Admission Requirements 

Admission to the program is based on students meeting the following standards. The quali- 
tative standards identified below reflect the minimum necessary for admission but do not en- 
sure admittance. 

• Bachelor's degree from an accredited university with a minimum undergraduate grade 
point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. 

• Minimum graduate grade point average of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale. 

• Graduate Record Examination minimum scores of 500 on the verbal, quantitative, 
and analytical general tests. 

• Five letters of recommendation. 

• Employer validation of 2000 hours of occupational experience related to a technical 
specialization. 

• Written statement including reasons for selecting the program, specialization, and 
goals upon graduation. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 1 9 



• Completion and mailing of application to the School of Graduate Studies, Indiana 
State University or completion of the application on-line at www.indstate.edu/grad/ 
applications .html . 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS REQUIRING CLASS A 
LICENSURE AND LICENSURE ONLY 

Students applying for graduate degree programs in agricultural education, elementary edu- 
cation, instructional technology, technology education, and secondary education programs are 
required to possess or be eligible to possess the Class A license. Eligibility for the Class M 
(graduate-level) licensure requires an individual to possess the initial Class A licensure. 

Agricultural Education 

Students pursuing the M.S. degree in agricultural education must satisfy requirements for 
the Class A licensure in agricultural education. Students who have earned some but not all 
undergraduate credits for agricultural education and students without the A license in the area 
of agricultural education should consult with the agricultural education coordinator or the chair- 
person in the Department of Agribusiness, Applied Economics and Agriscience Education to 
design a program of study that addresses requirements for the initial license. This program of 
study supplements the graduate requirements in this teaching specialty area. Students may be 
required to enroll in undergraduate courses in education and student teaching to fulfill licen- 
sure requirements. 

Elementary Education 

Students pursuing the M.A.Ed, degree in elementary education must satisfy requirements 
for the Class A licensure in elementary education before being admitted to the program. 

Instructional Technology 

Students interested in the M.S. degree in instructional technology and the 076 (Media 
Coordinator), 074 (Instructional Technology Specialist-Telecommunications) and 077 (Instruc- 
tional Technology Specialist-Computers) licensure must possess an initial Class A teaching 
license. Individuals without this license must meet with the instructional technology coordina- 
tor or the chairperson in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction to design a Class A 
licensure program of study before being admitted to the program. 

Technology Education 

Students pursuing the MS in Technology Education with a concentration in Technology 
Education, Teaching; Trade and Industrial Education, Teaching; or Workforce Development 
Director must satisfy the requirements for the Class A license in their area before being admit- 
ted to the program. They may be admitted as Post Baccalaureate Studies students to pursue 
completing licensure requirements. 



20 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS FOR LICENSURE 

Students who enter graduate study without the required credits in education courses and 
who are pursuing a teaching program in secondary education must complete a minimum of 24 
semester hours which may include the following undergraduate/graduate level courses: CUIN 
400, Psychological Foundations of Education; CUIN 619, Learning Theories; CUIN 625, Theory 
of American Public Education or CUIN 701; Philosophy of Education; CUIN 500, Principles 
and Curricula of Secondary Schools or CUIN 720, Curriculum Development; CUIN 624, Teach- 
ing Reading in the Secondary School; and CUIN 560, Observation and Student Teaching, or 
CUIN 559, Student Teaching in the Elementary School. 






REGISTRATION AND RECORDS 



It is each student's responsibility to be fully conversant with the academic regulations and 
requirements set forth in this Catalog and for revisions of same as posted on campus bulletin 
boards or released in other official publications of the University. Lack of knowledge of regu- 
lations and requirements does not excuse the student from complying with academic regula- 
tions and meeting the requirements. 

A student's program of study must be approved by his/her advisor, his/her chairperson, 
and members of the faculty advisor committee in his/her major department at registration. 

Advisors will make every attempt to give effective guidance to students in academic mat- 
ters and to refer students to those qualified to help them in other matters. However, the final 
i responsibility for meeting all academic requirements for a selected program rests with the 
; student. 

I Course of Study 

A student should refer to the requirements of his/her respective department or school for 
his/her program of study and confer with his/her advisor whenever problems arise. The student 
is expected to follow the program of academic work outlined as closely as possible. 

| 

< Official Registration 

Registration is a time designated each semester to allow the student and his/her advisor to 
review the student's records and plan a program for the next semester. 

The student has an opportunity to discuss academic problems with the advisor. Registra- 
tion helps to ensure that the courses requested on the registered schedule will be available to 
i the student the following semester. 

Any student who is enrolled in the University during the registration period is expected to 
: register during the period designated for this purpose. 

In order for a student to get credit for a course, he/she must be properly registered in that 
i course. This means that the student must have gone through the registration procedures as 
outlined by the University. Further, the student must have paid all required tuition and fees. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 2 1 



Late Registration 

A student is expected to complete enrollment (including the payment of all required fees) 
on the dates listed on the University Calendar. The payment of fees is part of the registration 
process. No student is eligible to attend classes until the required fees have been paid. 

A student who fails to complete registration during the scheduled dates will be required to 
pay a late registration fee of $20.00 beginning on the date specified in the University Calendar. 

Course Load 

A full-time graduate course load is 9 to 15 credits per semester (including audits) and 3-7 
credits per summer session (including audits). Audits in subjects in which the student has no 
previous experience will be evaluated at full credit value in determining course load. Audits 
taken as repetition of work previously accomplished are considered at one half of their value in 
calculating course loads. With the single exception of foreign language audits, all audit regis- 
trations must fall within the range of maximum permissible course loads. The maximum load is 
15 semester hours. 

Foreign students on F-l and J-l visas are required by the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service to carry a full-time course of study to remain in status. 

University Staff 

The maximum load for any fully employed member of the University faculty or staff will 
be six semester hours for the academic year. 

Concurrent Registration In Other Institutions 

A student registered in a degree program in the School of Graduate Studies may not enroll 
concurrently in another graduate school except upon permission, secured in advance, from the 
Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. 

Grading Policies 

Grades for graduate students are recorded as follows: A, excellent; B, average; C, below 
average; F, failure; S, work in progress (for courses in research); I, incomplete; W, withdrawal. 

1 . In order to earn a degree, a student must have a cumulative average of "B" (a grade 
point average of 3.0 on a system in which one hour of "A" earns 4 grade points). 

2. A graduate student automatically goes on probation when his/her cumulative average 
falls below "B ." 

3 . A student may be dropped from the degree program if he/she has not been removed 
from probation after two successive terms as a full-time student. 

4. A student may not repeat a required course in which "C" or above was earned. 

5. A student may repeat a required course in which "F" was earned. A student may not 
repeat the course more than once. If a student fails a second time, he/she is dismissed 
from the degree program. 

6. All hours attempted in graduate courses and all grade points earned are included in 
the computation of the cumulative average of a graduate student. 

7 . A student who stops attending a course but fails to withdraw officially may be assigned a 
grade of "F." 

8. All grades of "I" must be removed during the student's next term of enrollment. 

9. A student may not count towards a degree program any course in which a grade of 
"F" was earned. 

NOTE: The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction does not accept courses in 
which a student has received a "D" or "F" for renewal of certification. 



22 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Audit 

A regular student may audit a course by picking up the Audit Form from the Office of the 
Registrar. He/she must register officially for the course and pay the University Cashier. 

Attendance, preparation, and participation in the classroom discussion and laboratory ex- 
ercises shall be at the discretion of the instructor. 

A student who audits courses is not required to take examinations or tests and he/she 
receives no credit. An auditor may not change his/her registration from audit to credit or from 
credit to audit after late registration ends. COURSE AUDITING IS WITHOUT CREDIT. 

Change of Grade 

A request for a change of grade, for any reason, must be made within one year following 
, the date the original grade was assigned by the faculty member. 

Grade Appeal 

A student may appeal the final grade earned in a course. Initially, the student should at- 
i tempt to resolve the matter informally through meeting with the instructor of the course, the 
department chairperson, and/or dean of the academic unit in which the grade was assigned. If 
the matter is not resolved through this level of interaction, then the student should consult the 
individual school/college on its written grade appeal policy. A student wishing to pursue a 
written appeal of a grade must demonstrate a legitimate basis for the appeal. Grade appeal 
decisions are final at the level of the school/college. 

Academic Warning, Probation, and Dismissal 

A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (B) is required for graduation. A department shall 
recommend courses in which the grades of "B" or better will be required. Effective fall 2004, 
A student who accumulates nine or more semester hours of grades below "B" shall be dis- 
missed. When a student 's grade point average (GPA) falls below 3. 0, he/she will be warned and 
informed that he/she must raise the GPA to 3.0 or better within the next nine semester hours. 
Students failing to do so will be dismissed from the School of Graduate Studies and no further 
registration in a graduate classification will be permitted. 

Graduate-level courses with a grade below "C" are not acceptable in a program of 
study. In addition, graduate transfer courses with a grade of "C" or lower are not accept- 
able in the program of study. See section on Grading Policies. 

i Eligibility for Assistantship 

A graduate student must be in good academic standing (3.0 GPA or better) to be eligible 
for appointment to an assistantship, fellowship, scholarship or traineeship, and must be regis- 
I tered in each semester in which the appointment is in effect. 

i Changing Programs 

A student may transfer from one School/College of the University to another with the 
written approval and acceptance of the graduate programs involved. The proper forms on which 
to apply for such a change are to be obtained from the School of Graduate Studies Office and 
executed at least six weeks prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student plans to 
transfer. When such a transfer is made, the student must satisfy the current academic require- 
ments of the School/College and/or department into which the student has transferred. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 23 



Withdrawal from the University 

A student who wishes or is asked to leave the University at any time during the semester 
shall execute and file an official withdrawal form. This form may be obtained from the Coun- 
seling Services. The form should be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar. 

A student who withdraws from the University within 15 calendar days of the beginning of 
the final examination period for the semester shall receive a "W" in all classes enrolled. Failure 
to execute and file this form in a timely manner will result in a student receiving an "F" for 
each course in which he/she was enrolled during the semester in question. 

Incompletes 

A student is expected to complete all requirements of a particular course during the semes- 
ter in which he/she is registered. However, if at the end of the semester a small portion of the 
work remains unfinished and should be deferred because of some serious circumstances be- 
yond the control of the student, an "I" may be submitted. 

Along with the recording of the incomplete grade, the instructor must also file with the 
chairperson of the department the student's average grade and a written description of the work 
that must be completed before the incomplete is removed. 

Procedure for the Removal of an Incomplete 

An incomplete grade must be removed within SIX WEEKS after the beginning of the next 
semester. If the student has not removed the incomplete within the time specified, the incom- 
plete is automatically changed to an "F." Developmental, thesis, and research courses are ex- 
empted from the six- week time limit. 

Continuous Registration 

After a student is admitted to the School of Graduate Studies and enrolls for the first time, 
she/he is required to maintain continuous registration, i.e., be enrolled each semester, exclud- 
ing summer sessions, until he/she has either graduated or her/his graduate program at North 
Carolina A&T State University has been terminated. All students must be registered in the 
semester or summer session in which they formally complete their degree requirements. 

A student in good academic standing who must interrupt his/her graduate program for 
good reasons may request a leave of absence from graduate study for a definite period of time, 
normally not to exceed one year. The request should be made at least one month prior to the 
term involved. Upon endorsement of the request by the student's graduate advisory committee 
and Director of Graduate Programs, and approval by the School of Graduate Studies, the stu- 
dent will not be required to be registered during the leave of absence. The time that the student 
spends on an approved leave of absence will be included in the time allowed to complete the 
degree, i.e., six years for the master's and ten years for the doctorate. 

Graduate students whose programs have been terminated because of failure to maintain 
continuous registration and who have not been granted a leave of absence will be required to 
complete a new application and be formally accepted into the program of study again. 

Changes in Schedule 

A change in a student's class schedule may be made with the consent of his/her advisor or 
department chairperson. However, if a student's schedule is changed after the designated drop 
add period, the consent of the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies is required. 

The student must obtain and properly execute the Change of Schedule Form. This form is 
obtained from the Office of the Registrar and should be returned to that office. 



24 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Class Attendance Policy 

Class Attendance 

The University is committed to the principle that regular and punctual class attendance is 
essential to the student's optimum scholastic achievement. An absence, excused or unexcused, 
does not relieve the student of any course requirement. Regular class attendance is a student's 
obligation, and a student is responsible for all the work, including tests and written work re- 
quested or assigned during all class meetings. 

Instructor 's Responsibility 

1) Description of attendance requirements should be stated in the course syllabus and 
announced in class, particularly at the beginning of each term. If class attendance is to 
affect a student's course grade, then a statement to that effect must be a part of the 
course syllabus distributed to each student. 

2) Instructors will keep attendance records in all classes. Each instructor has the right to 
prescribe procedures as to how and when attendance will be taken. 

Student's Responsibility 

It is the responsibility of each student to learn and comply with the requirements set by the 
instructor for each class in which he/she is registered. The student should 

1) have knowledge of each instructor's attendance and monitoring practices for class 
absences during the term; 

2) become familiar with all materials covered in each course during absences, and make 
up any work required by the instructor; and 

3) initiate the request to make up work on the first day of class attendance after the 
absence. 

Policy on the Make-up of Required Course Work 

The administration, faculty, and staff recognize that there are circumstances and events 
which require students to miss classes and the required course work which may be performed 
or required on the day of the absence. Also, they recognize that required course work is needed 
to give each student an adequate performance evaluation. Therefore, whenever reasonable (and 
more specifically described below), students should be allowed to make-up required work. 

The following definitions will apply with respect to this policy: 

a) Required course work— All work which will be used in the determination of final 
grades, e.g., examinations, announced quizzes, required papers and essays, required 
assignments. 

b) Instructor— Person responsible for the course and providing instruction and evaluation. 

c) Permissible reasons for requesting the make-up of required work: Sickness (verifica- 
tion needed); death of relatives (immediate family); participation in approved Uni- 
versity related activities; or acting in the capacity of a representative of the University 
(band, choir, sports related travel, etc.). Extraordinary circumstances (court appear- 
ance, family emergency, etc.)— require a signed statement. NOTE: Other reasons for 
requesting the make-up of required course work are not acceptable. 

Grade Reports 

As soon as grades are determined, at the end of each semester or summer term, students 
may go to the website at https: //web fori .ncat.edu/ . and retrieve their grades. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 25 



Privacy of Student Records 

The University ensures students access to their official academic records but prohibits the 
release of personally identifiable information, other than "directory information," from these 
records without their permission, except as specified by public law 93-380. "Directory infor- 
mation" includes the following: Student's name, address, telephone number, email address, 
date and place of birth, school, major, sex, marital status, dates of attendance, degree received, 
honors received, institution(s) attended prior to admission to North Carolina Agricultural and 
Technical State University, past and present participation in officially recognized sports and 
activities, and physical factors. Public Law 93-380 further provides that any student may, upon 
written request, restrict the printing of such personal information relating to himself or herself 
as is usually included in campus directories. A student who desires to have "directory informa- 
tion" withheld, must get the "nondisclosure" form from the Office of the Registrar. The form 
should be returned one week before the beginning of classes for the semester or session in 
which the student is enrolled. 

Access to Student Records 

1 . The policy for the administration of student academic records is in accordance with 
the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended. 

2. A student has the right to inspect and review any and all official records, files, and 
data directly related to him/her. 

3 . A student who believes that his/her record contains inaccurate or misleading informa- 
tion shall have an opportunity for a hearing to challenge the content of the record to 
ensure that the record is not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of his/ 
her privacy or rights, and to provide an opportunity for the correction or deletion of 
any such inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise inappropriate data contained therein or 
for the inclusion of the student's own statement of explanation. 

4. The University will comply with a request from a student to review his/her record 
within a reasonable period of time and not later than thirty (30) days after the request 
is received. 

5. The release of academic records requires the written permission of the student, except 
as provided by Public Law 93-380. Transcripts are not issued to a student who has not 
met his/her financial obligations to the University. 

6. Copies of the "University's Statement" concerning access to students' records are 
available in the Office of the Registrar, as well as the office of each school/college 
dean and department chairperson. 

Change of Name and Address 

It is the obligation of every student to notify the Office of the Registrar of any change in 
name or address. The student may also complete the change of address form online by visiting 
the website at https://webforl .ncat.edu/ . Failure to do so can cause serious delay in the han- 
dling of the student's records and in notification of emergencies at home. A legal court docu- 
ment must accompany the request to change the student's name. 

Transcripts of Records 

Requests for official transcripts of students' records should be addressed to the University 
Registrar. The cost is $2.00 per copy. 



26 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Indebtedness to the University 

No diploma, certificate, or transcript of a record will be issued if a student has not made 
satisfactory settlement with the cashier for all indebtedness to the University. A student may 
not be permitted to attend classes or take final examinations after the due date of any unpaid 
obligation. 

Academic Dishonesty Policy 

North Carolina A&T State University is committed to a policy of academic honesty for all 
, students. Examples of Academic Dishonesty include but are not limited to the following: 

• Cheating or knowingly assisting another student in committing an act of academic 
dishonesty. 

• Plagiarism (unauthorized use of another person's words or ideas as one's own) which 
includes but is not necessarily limited to submitting examinations, theses, reports, 
drawings, laboratory notes, or other materials as one's own work when such work has 
been prepared by another person or copied from another person. 

• Unauthorized possession of examinations or reserved library materials, destruction 
or hiding of source materials, library materials, or laboratory materials, or experi- 
ments, or any other similar action. 

• Unauthorized changing of grades or marking on an examination or in an instructor's 
grade book, or such change of any grade record. 

• Aiding or abetting in the infraction of any of the provisions anticipated under the 
general standards of student conduct. 

• Assisting another student in violating any of the above rules. 

A student who has committed an act of academic dishonesty has failed to meet a basic 
requirement of satisfactory academic performance. Thus, academic dishonesty is not only a 
basis for disciplinary action but may also affect the evaluation of the student's level of perfor- 
mance. Any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty is subject to disciplinary 
action as defined below. 

In instances where a student has clearly been identified as having committed an academic 
act of dishonesty, the instructor may take appropriate punitive action including a loss of credit 
for an assignment, an examination or project, or awarding a grade of "F" for the course subject 
to the review and endorsement of the chairperson and the dean. Repeated offenses can even 
lead to dismissal from the University. 

Student Appeals on Academic Dishonesty 

A student who feels unfairly treated as a result of an academic dishonesty matter may 
appeal the action in writing to the University Judicial Tribunal. The written notice of appeal 
must be submitted within one week (seven calendar days) of the date of the incident. The 
student should refer to the section on Appellate Procedures in the Student Handbook. 

Graduation 

There are four official graduations (June, August, December and May) for graduate stu- 
I dents per year, occurring at the end of the fall and spring semesters and at the end of the second 
summer session. Formal commencement exercises are held at the end of the spring and fall 
semesters, but any student who graduated during summer sessions is eligible to participate in 
the December Commencement. Any doctoral candidate wishing to have the degree conferred 
in absentia must notify the School of Graduate Studies in writing; master's candidates should 
contact their departments or programs. Students must be enrolled in the semester in which 
they apply for graduation. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 27 



TUITION AND FEES 

The fee charged to a full-time student carrying nine or more semester hours of work is the 
same as that charged to a full-time undergraduate student. For one academic year, a state resi- 
dent should expect to pay approximately $3,138.00, which will cover tuition and required fees; 
this sum does not include room and board charges. Tuition and required fees for an out-of-state 
student carrying a full schedule will total $12,723.00 for the academic year. Current room and 
board rates are $2,484.00 per semester. 

As student fees are subject to change without prior notice, it is advised that the Treasurer's 
Office be contacted for complete information concerning charges for full-time and part-time 
students. 

Special Fees 

Fee for processing admission application $45.00 (Effective Fall 2006) 

Late Registration $20.00 

Graduation fees: 

Diploma $60.00 

Regalia (cap and gown) $20.00 

Transcript $ 2.00 

Master's Thesis and Dissertation binding fee $48.00 

EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 

General Information 

NORTH CAROLINA A&T STATE UNIVERSITY IS A PUBLICLY SUPPORTED IN- 
STITUTION. TUITION PAYMENTS AND OTHER REQUIRED STUDENT FEES MEET 
ONLYAPART OF THE TOTAL COST OF EDUCATION OF STUDENTS ENROLLED. ON 
THE AVERAGE, FOR EACH FULL-TIME STUDENT ENROLLED IN AN INSTITUTION 
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA, THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 
APPROPRIATED $8,558 PER YEAR IN PUBLIC FUNDS TO SUPPORT THE EDUCA- 
TIONAL PROGRAMS OFFERED. 

THE UNIVERSITY RESERVES THE RIGHT TO INCREASE OR DECREASE ALL 
FEES AND CHARGES AS WELL AS ADD OR DELETE ITEMS OF EXPENSE WITHOUT 
ADVANCED NOTICE AS CIRCUMSTANCES, IN THE JUDGMENT OF THE ADMINIS- 
TRATION, MAY REQUIRE. 

Boarding and Lodging fees are based on the actual number of days school is in session and 
do not include holidays, breaks, or any other University vacations. 

Students' property in dormitories and other University buildings is at the sole risk of the 
owner, and the University is not responsible for loss, theft, or damage to such property arising 
from any cause. 

Students are required to pay for any loss or damage to University property cost due to 
abuse, negligence, or malicious action at replacement, in addition to being subject to disciplin- 
ary action for such loss or damage. 

All undergraduate and graduate students are required to purchase all textbooks. This in- 
cludes hardcover and paperback textbooks. The cost will vary according to academic discipline. 
Other policies and procedures governing the book-purchase system can be obtained from the 
University Bookstore. 



28 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Personal spending money should be sent directly to and made payable to the student in the 
form of money orders or certified checks. As a policy, the University does not cash personal 
checks for students in any amount. 

Grades, diplomas and transcripts are withheld until the student has paid in full all fees and 
charges due to the University. A student in debt to the University in any amount will not be 
permitted to enroll for any subsequent semester until his or her obligations are paid. If special 
financial arrangements have been made, failure to comply with these arrangements as stipu- 
lated will result in the student forfeiting his/her privilege to receive special financial arrange- 
ments for deferments in the future. 

Special Notice to Veterans 

Veterans attending school under the provisions of Public Law 89-358 receive a monthly 
subsistence allowance from Veterans Administration. Therefore, veterans are responsible for 
meeting all of their required fee obligations. 

Veterans attending school under the provision of Public Law 894 (Disabled Veterans) re- 
ceive a monthly subsistence allowance from Veterans Administration. Also, Veterans Adminis- 
tration pays directly to the school the cost of the veteran's tuition and required fees. All other 
fees are the responsibility of the veteran. 

Veterans may contact the Veterans Affairs Office on Campus for any special consideration 
which may be available. 

Auditing 

To audit a course, a student must obtain permission from the Dean of the School of Gradu- 
ate Studies and must submit the necessary forms during the registration period. A part-time 
student must pay all fees, including tuition, that would be charged to a student taking the course 
for credit. A full-time student is not required to pay any additional fees for auditing. A change 
from credit registration to audit will not be permitted after late registration ends. An auditor is 
not required to participate in class discussions, prepare assignments, or take examinations. 

Full-Time Faculty and Employees 

Full-time employees of the University who hold membership in the Teachers' and State 
Employees' Retirement System may register for credit or as auditors with free tuition privi- 
leges for one course in any academic term at any campus of the University of North Carolina. 
Each applicant for free tuition must submit through regular channels a form provided by the 
University. COURSE AUDITING IS WITHOUT CREDIT. 

Refund Policy 

Refunds for official withdrawals from North Carolina A&T State University are prorated, 
based upon the percentage of the enrollment period attended. No refunds are made for official 
withdrawals after the fifth week of the enrollment period. The prorated withdrawal schedule is 
publicized in the schedule of classes booklet and through other University media. 

Residence Status for Tuition Purposes 

The basis for determining the appropriate tuition charge rests upon whether a student is a 
resident or a nonresident for tuition purposes. Each student must make a statement as to the 
length of his or her residence in North Carolina, with assessment by the institution of that 
statement to be conditioned by the following. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 29 



Residence. To qualify as a resident for tuition purposes, a person must become a legal 
resident and remain a legal resident for at least twelve months immediately prior to classifica- 
tion. Thus, there is a distinction between legal residence and residence for tuition purposes. 
Furthermore, twelve months legal residence means more than simple abode in North Carolina. 
In particular, it means maintaining a domicile (permanent home of indefinite duration) as op- 
posed to "maintaining a mere temporary residence or abode incident to enrollment in an insti- 
tution of higher education." The burden of establishing facts which justify classification of a 
student as a resident entitled to in-state tuition rates is on the applicant, who must show his or 
her entitlement by the preponderance (the greater part) of the residentiary information. 

Initiative. Being classified a resident for tuition purposes is contingent on the student's 
seeking such status and providing all information that the institution may require in making the 
determination. 

Parents' Domicile. If an individual, irrespective of age, has living parents(s) or court 
appointed guardian of the person, the domicile of such parent(s) or guardian is, prima facie, the 
domicile of the individual; but this prima facie evidence of the individual's domicile may or 
may not be sustained by other information. Further, no domiciliary status of parents is not 
deemed prima facie evidence of the applicant child's status if the applicant has lived (though 
not necessarily legally resided) in North Carolina for the five years preceding enrollment or re- 
registration. 

Effect of Marriage. Marriage alone does not prevent a person from becoming or continu- 
ing to be a resident for tuition purposes, nor does marriage in any circumstance ensure that a 
person will become or continue to be a resident for tuition purposes. Marriage and the legal 
residence of one's spouse are, however, relevant information in determining residentiary in- 
tent. Furthermore, if both a husband and his wife are legal residents of North Carolina and if 
one of them has been a legal resident longer than the other, then the longer duration may be 
claimed by either spouse in meeting the twelve-month requirement for in-state tuition status. 

Military Personnel. A North Carolinian who serves outside the State in the armed forces 
does not lose North Carolina domicile simply by reason of such service. And students from the 
military may prove retention or establishment of residence by reference, as in other cases, to 
residentiary acts accompanied by residentiary intent. 

In addition, a separate North Carolina statute affords tuition rate benefits to certain mili- 
tary personnel and their dependents even though not qualifying for the in-state tuition rate by 
reason of twelve months legal residence in North Carolina. Members of the armed services, 
while stationed in and concurrently living in North Carolina, may be charged a tuition rate 
lower than the out-of-state tuition rate to the extent that the total of entitlements for application 
tuition costs available from the federal government, plus certain amounts based under a statu- 
tory formula upon the in-state tuition rate, is a sum less than the out-of-state tuition rate for the 
pertinent enrollment. A dependent relative of a service member stationed in North Carolina is 
eligible to be charged the in-state tuition rate while the dependent relative is living in North 
Carolina with the service member and if the dependent relative has met any requirement of the 
Selective Service System applicable to the dependent relative. These tuition benefits may be 
enjoyed only if the applicable requirements for admission have been met; these benefits alone 
do not provide the basis for receiving those derivative benefits under the provisions of the 
residence classification status reviewed elsewhere in this summary. 

Grace Period. If a person (1) has been a bona fide legal resident, (2) has consequently 
been classified a resident for tuition purposes, and (3) has subsequently lost North Carolina 
legal residence while enrolled at a public institution of higher education, that person may con- 
tinue to enjoy the in-state tuition rate for a grace period of twelve months measured from the 
date on which North Carolina legal residence was lost. If the twelve months ends during an 
academic term for which the person is enrolled at a State institution of higher education, the 



30 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



grace period extends, in addition, to the end of that term. The fact of marriage to one who 
continues domiciled outside North Carolina does not by itself cause loss of legal residence 
marking the beginning of the grace period. 

Minors. Minors (persons under 18 years of age) usually have the domicile of their par- 
ents, but certain special cases are recognized by the residence classification statute in deter- 
mining residence for tuition purposes. 

(a) If a minor's parents live apart, the minor's domicile is deemed to be North Carolina for the 
time period(s) that either parent, as a North Carolina legal resident, may claim and does 
claim the minor as a tax dependent, even if other law or judicial act assigns the minor's 
domicile outside North Carolina. A minor thus deemed to be a legal resident will not, upon 
achieving majority before enrolling at an institution of higher education, lose North Caro- 
lina legal residence if that person (1) upon becoming an adult "acts, to the extent that the 
person's degree of actual emancipation permits, in a manner consistent with bona fide 
legal residence in North Carolina" and (2) "begins enrollment at an institution of higher 
education not later than the fall academic term following completion of education prereq- 
uisite to admission at such institution." 

(b) If a minor has lived for five or more consecutive years with relatives (other than parents) 
who are domiciled in North Carolina and if the relatives have functioned during this time 
as if they were personal guardians, the minor will be deemed a resident for tuition pur- 
poses for an enrolled term commencing immediately after at least five years in which 
these circumstances have existed. If under this consideration a minor is deemed to be a 
resident for tuition purposes immediately prior to his or her eighteenth birthday, that per- 
son on achieving majority will be deemed a legal resident of North Carolina of at least 
twelve months duration. This provision acts to confer in-state tuition status even in the 
face of other provisions of law to the contrary; however, a person deemed a resident of 
twelve months duration pursuant to this provision continues to be a legal resident of the 
State only so long as he or she does not abandon North Carolina domicile. 

Lost but Regained Domicile . If a student ceases enrollment at or graduates from an insti- 
tution of higher education while classified a resident for tuition purposes and then both aban- 
dons and reacquires North Carolina domicile within a 12-month period, that person, if he or 
she continues to maintain the reacquired domicile into re-enrollment at an institution of higher 
education, may re-enroll at the in-state tuition rate without having to meet the usual twelvemonth 
durational requirement. However, any one person may receive the benefit of the provision only 
once. 

Change of Status. A student admitted to initial enrollment in an institution (or permitted 
to re-enroll following an absence from the institutional program which involved a formal with- 
drawal from enrollment) must be classified by the admitting institution either as a resident or as 
a nonresident for tuition purposes prior to actual enrollment. A residence status classification 
once assigned (and finalized pursuant to any appeal properly taken) may be changed thereafter 
(with corresponding change in billing rates) only at intervals corresponding with the estab- 
lished primary divisions of the academic year. 

Transfer Students. When a student transfers from one North Carolina public institution 
of higher education to another, he or she is treated as a new student by the institution to which 
he or she is transferring and must be assigned an initial residence status classification for tu- 
ition purposes. 

Financial Support for Graduate Students 

Financial aid is money awarded to assist students in paying for the cost of an education. 
Applying and receiving financial aid is a simple process. Students apply for need-based and 
some non-need-based financial aid by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 3 1 



(FAFSA). Students should complete this form immediately after January 1. There is no pro- 
cessing fee and all graduate students are encouraged to complete the application. Students can 
submit the FAFSA on the Web (http://www.fafsa.ed.gov) or mail the form to the Federal Pro- 
cessing Center. North Carolina A&T State University school code is 002905. The University's 
priority deadline for receipt of the FAFSA is March 15th; however, students who miss the 
deadline are still encouraged to complete and mail the FAFSA as soon as possible. 

A financial aid award will not be offered until a student is admitted to the University. 
Therefore, it is important that the admission procedure be completed as soon as possible. 

A student enrolled as a "Post-baccalaureate Studies (PBS)" student is not eligible to re- 
ceive Federal and State financial aid unless enrolled in a Teacher Certification Program. The 
student must petition the Dean of Graduate Studies to have his/her status reviewed and changed, 
if applicable. 

All students must re-apply for financial assistance each academic year and separately for 
summer school . 

Types of Available Funds 

Graduate students are eligible for Assistantships, Stipends, Scholarships, Work, Loans 
and some Grants. Work assistance must be earned and loans must be repaid. 

Graduate Assistantship 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available to qualified individuals. The 
student is assigned to assist a professor or a department for a limited number of hours for the 
duration of the assistantship. Some graduate assistants are assigned to teach freshman classes. 
Normally, a graduate assistant will be assigned to teach only one class per semester, but he/she 
may be assigned to teach a maximum of two classes. The assistantship offers a stipend that will 
assist a student to pay required tuition, fees, books, and room and board. Application for an 
assistantship must be made to the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies at least five months 
before fall registration. Only full-time graduate students are eligible. 

Stipends 

Stipend scholarships are considered a resource for financial aid purposes and must be 
included in the financial aid award. If the student receives stipend assistance, the amount may 
reduce or cancel federal or state financial assistance. 

Course Work 

Masters and Doctoral students must enroll in at least half time (5 hours) of graduate 
course work (600 or 700 course level) to be eligible for a Federal Direct Student Loan. The 
University considers 9 hours to be full-time; therefore, half-time would be 5 hours. Financial 
aid for Graduate students will not cover undergraduate courses taken unless the student is 
enrolled in the Teacher Certification Program. 

Scholarships 

The majority of scholarships at NC A&T State University are awarded through the aca- 
demic department. Students are strongly urged to contact their academic department for addi- 
tional scholarship information. Students receiving an outside scholarship should forward a 
copy of the notice to the Student Financial Aid Office. The scholarship will be included in the 
student's award and may cause an adjustment to the current award package. All scholarship 
checks should be made payable to North Carolina A&T State University and mailed to the 
Treasurer's Office. The check should include the student's name and social security number. 



32 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Federal Work Study 

i 

Federal Work-Study is available to eligible students. Job assignments are available to gradu- 

i ate students with financial need. The Federal Work-Study Program provides students the op- 
: portunity to earn part of their educational expenses and to gain valuable work experience for 
future reference. The total amount of the award is listed on the award notification. Students 
who are awarded Federal Work-Study must pick up an assignment form from the Student Fi- 
nancial Aid Office at the beginning of the Fall semester. Students cannot begin work until an 
authorization is received and returned to the Student Financial Aid Office. Students should 
, report back to the assigned department in the Spring semester. The Student Financial Aid Of- 
fice is not responsible for paying hours which exceed the award amount. Students working on 
: campus are paid monthly, normally, on the 15th of each month. It is the student's and supervisor's 
. responsibility to ensure that the award amount is not exceeded. Time sheets are due in the 
1 Student Financial Aid Office monthly in order for the student to be paid. Time sheets received 
after the due date will be held until the next payroll. Checks are distributed from the Treasurer's 
Office. The Federal Work-Study award cannot be used toward payment of University fees at 

registration. 

i 

Loans 

The Student Financial Aid Office awards funds through the Federal Direct Loan Program 
to Graduate Students. This is a loan and must be repaid with interest. There are two types of 
Federal Direct loans. Subsidized Loans are based on financial need and the government pays 
the interest on the student's behalf as long as the student is attending school at least half-time (5 
or more hours per semester). The student is responsible for the interest payments on an 
i unsubsidized loan. The interest is billed quarterly. Students can allow the interest to be capital- 
i ized and added to the principal, if payment cannot be made. Students must sign a promissory 
: note. Promissory notes are signed via the web. Students are encouraged to borrow the mini- 
mum loan amount. If this is the student's first time borrowing at NC A&T State University, the 
borrower must attend an entrance counseling, session before the first disbursement is made. 
Students should review the promissory note for the expected disbursement dates. Loan funds 
will be applied to the student's account according to the University's schedule. The loan is 
disbursed in two payments. Generally, refunds are available from the Treasurer's Office five to 
ten days after the loan is applied to the account. 

Students are notified of the amount of aid received through the award notification. The 
award notification indicates the gross amount of the loan for the fall and spring semester and/ 
or summer sessions. The student's account and bill indicate the actual amount received. Stu- 
dents have the right to cancel all or part of the loan within 14 days after disbursement. Students 
interested in canceling or reducing their loan must notify the Student Financial Aid Office in 
writing. The correspondence must be received in the Student Financial Aid Office within four- 
t teen days from the date of the bill; otherwise, the loan will remain on the student's account. If 
i the loan is canceled, the student is responsible for any outstanding account balance. 

Adjustment to an Award - Financial aid budgets and awards will be adjusted for gradu- 
ate students enrolled less than nine (9) hours. Adjustments will be based on the hours 
enrolled as of the census date. If adjustments are made and the student has received a 
refund, the student will be responsible for any balance due to the University. 

Teacher Certification - Students working on Teaching Certification only are eligible to 
receive a Federal Direct Student Loan provided the student is enrolled in at least six (6) 
credit hours. The loan can only be awarded at the undergraduate fifth year level. Students 
can only borrow at the fifth grade level only twice. Students cannot exceed the aggregate 
maximum loan amount as an undergraduate student. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 33 



Revision or Cancellation of Aid - The Student Financial Aid Office reserves the right to 
revise or cancel the award because of changes in your financial or academic status or if 
you receive additional financial assistance. The submission of false or misleading infor- 
mation will be considered immediate grounds for cancellation of aid. If you receive addi 
tional scholarships or loans that cause your award to exceed need or the cost of attendance 
at the University, your financial aid award will be reduced or canceled to prevent the over 
award or over-budget. 

Withdrawals - Students withdraw from the University for various reasons. Students with- 
drawing from the University should follow the withdrawal procedure. The Federal Gov- 
ernment has implemented a withdrawal policy for institutions. It is called the Return of 
Title IV Funds. If you receive financial aid and withdraw before the mid-point of the 
semester, you may be required to repay any refund received and other aid disbursed on 
your account. You will be notified, in writing, of the amount that must be repaid. 

Summer School 

Students interested in attending Summer School must complete a separate application and 
have a current year FAFSA on file. Graduate students generally receive only the Federal Direct 
Student Loan, if there is remaining eligibility. All students must attend the First Summer Ses- 
sion to be eligible for a Direct Loan. A student must enroll in at least five credit hours (half- 
time) to receive loan assistance. Students who are not maintaining satisfactory academic progress 
should attend summer school to remove the deficiency, but will not be eligible for financial 
assistance. 

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS 

GRADUATE ELIGIBILITY 

To be in compliance with the Satisfactory Academic Progress standards, graduate students 
must meet the following requirements to continue receipt of financial aid: 

A . They must have a cumulative grade point average (gpa) of 3 .0 or better at the end of 
each academic year. 

B. If full-time, graduate students must earn 9 hours each semester. 

C. If less than full-time, graduate students must pass all hours attempted during the se- 
mester. 

D. They must not exceed 54 attempted hours. Majors in Counseling Education, Agency 
Counseling and Business and Industry must not exceed 90 attempted hours. 

E. They must not exceed six semesters of full-time enrollment (full-time is 9 or more 
hours.) 

Failure to earn the required hours and/or grade point average will result in the student 
being suspended from financial aid. Students can attend summer school to make up the defi- 
ciency; however, the student is responsible for payment of charges. Additional information on 
financial aid programs can be obtained from the University website ( http://www.ncat.edu ). 

Immunization for Graduate Students 

All full-time graduate students admitted to a degree program are required by State Law to 
submit a report of medical history and immunization documentation prior to completing their 
initial registration. North Carolina A&T State University students returning to the School of 
Graduate Studies must have their medical history file updated. The required immunizations 
must be submitted to the student health center before registration for classes. If this requirement is 



34 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



■ 



aot met, dismissal from school is mandatory under state law. Students taking evening (after 
5:00 p.m.) and weekend classes are not required to submit immunizations. The following im- 
munizations are required by state law and are offered at the Student Health Center for the 
following cost: 

North Carolina Immunization Requirement 

4GE (18-29 years) AGE (30-49 years) AGE (50-over) 

2 measles vaccines 1 rubella vaccine 1 Td booster 

1 rubella 1 Td booster or Td series with booster 

1 mumps Td series with booster 
or 

2 doses of MMR 
and 

1 Td booster or 

Td series with booster 

Additionally, International students are required to have a TB skin test and negative result 
or chest x-ray. 

Tetanus (within ten years) $10.00 

MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) $10.00 

— 1 vaccine for students 30 years and older, 

— 2 vaccines for students under age 30 

Tuberculin skin test for international students $ 5.00 

GRADUATE STUDENTS ARE NOT REQUIRED TO HAVE A PHYSICAL 
EXAMINATION. 

However, for new students who have been accepted, please complete the medical history form 
enclosed in your graduate admission packet, and return it to: 

Sebastian Health Center 

North Carolina A&T State University 

Greensboro, North Carolina 27411 

Attention: Medical Records 

HEALTH SERVICES 

http://www.ncat.edu/~health 

The Director of Health Services manages the Sebastian Health Center. Medical services are 
available to all students that have paid the student health fee as part of their general university 
fee. 

The basic components of the Health Service Program are as follows: 

1 . Medical Services: The University Physician/s are on duty in the Health Center daily 
(hours for routine treatment are posted) — and "on 24 hour call" for emergency situ- 
ations. A staff psychiatrist is also available by appointment. 

2. Nursing Services: Under the direction of the Nurse Supervisor, registered nurses 
are in attendance daily to evaluate and treat health needs and answer any question 
pertaining to health problems and other concerns. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 35 



3. Laboratory Services: A Certified Medical Technologist is on duty Monday-Friday 
to perform various laboratory tests as ordered by the physician to diagnose a variety 
of medical problems. 

4. Medical Records: The Medical Records Director is responsible for maintaining a 
secure and confidential file of all student health records in the Health Center. Addi- 
tionally, the North Carolina State Immunization Law stipulates required vaccines must 
be on file in the medical records department of the Health Center prior to registration. 

5 . Pharmacy Services: A registered pharmacist is available Monday-Friday to dispense 
medication and provide patient counseling about prescriptions filled. 

6. Health Education Services: Health education is available through the health educa- 
tors on a variety of health concerns or issues. The Health Educators are available 
Monday-Friday to assist students with all health issues or concerns. 

The Center provides up-to-date and emerging information on health related issues and con- 
cerns on a continuing basis for the University community. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AND SCHOLARS OFFICE 

International Students and Scholars Office 

Room 221 Murphy Hall - (336) 334-7551 - (336) 334-7001 -fax 

www.ncat .edu/~isso 

isso@ncat.edu 

The International Students and Scholars Office (ISSO) provides programs, services and 
assistance to non-immigrants and immigrants who choose, and are admitted to pursue courses 
of study at North Carolina A&T State University. These services include: 

Issuance of the I-20/DS-2019 Certificate of Eligibility 

Pre-arrival assistance and information 

Arrival/adjustment assistance 

Housing information and contacts 

Insurance requirements 

Immigration status matters 

Permanent Resident, U.S. Naturalization, Resident Alien, and Asylum Verification 
Orientation and status advisement are provided throughout the matriculation process in 
group and/or individual sessions. In cooperation with departments and organizations, includ- 
ing the International Students Association (ISA), the Office provides activities that enhance 
cultural, social, and personal development. The University also affiliates with local and na- 
tional organizations promoting multicultural understanding and involvement in the Greens- 
boro community. This exposure offers participation in a variety of activities and service related 
projects both on campus and within the City. Currently, over 150 international students attend 
the University and represent 50 countries. 

All foreign born students applying to the University are required to verify their immigra- 
tion/residency status prior to moving forward in the enrollment process. This requires that 
international applicants maintain close contact with the International Students and Scholars 
Office (ISSO) and notify the ISSO immediately of any change in immigration status. Local 
address changes during application and enrollment must also be updated and reported through 
SEVIS within 10 days for students in either F-l or J-l status. 

The ISSO works closely with the graduate admissions process and will not issue the Cer- 
tificate of Eligibility (1-20) to F-l Status applicants nor the Certificate of Eligibility (DS-2019) 
to J-l status applicants until all of the admissions requirements are met or waived. Certificates 



36 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



of Eligibility (1-20) and/or (DS-2019) issued by another institution are not valid at North 
Carolina A&T State University. 

Certificates of Eligibility will be issued by the ISSO to prospective students prior to en- 
i rollment after the following have been satisfied: 

1 . Documentation of the TOEFL score (550 or above) 

2. Transcript evaluation by an internationally approved credentials evaluation agency at the 
applicant's expense 

3 . Receipt of certified financial guarantee documents (letter of support, bank statement, and 
verification of salary from sponsor's employer) 

4. A deposit for the first year's tuition and fees, including the cost of mandatory insurance 
coverage 

5 . Proof of valid immigration status if the applicant is currently residing in the United States 

6 . Transfer waiver if applicant is transferring to the University from within the United States 

7 . Financial guarantee at the rate of $6,000 for spouse and $4,000 for minor dependents, if a 
student is bringing them with him/her to the United States 

Information regarding the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) and other admissions re- 
quirements are available through the School of Graduate Studies. Please refer to the University 
website, http://www.ncat .edu/~gradsch/ , or call (336) 334-7920. 

While attending North Carolina A&T State University, non-immigrants are required to 
maintain lawful status with the Citizenship & Immigration Services (CIS) and the Depart- 
ment of State (DoS). New rules and regulations effective January 1 , 2003 require that students 
at the graduate level: 

a. Enroll in and maintain a minimum of nine (9) semester hours (six if approved for an 
assistantship) 

b. Maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0 

c. Complete all provisions for acceptance within the first semester or as required by the 
School of Graduate 

d. Provide changes in status and address to the ISSO within 10 days of the change 

e. Attend required ISSO Orientation at the beginning of each semester 

f . Maintain mandatory insurance coverage for self and all dependents 

g. Complete registration and provide proof of enrollment and insurance coverage within 1 5 
days after classes begin 

Legal regulations governing non-immigrant students are complex. The ISSO is available 
to discuss implications and explain the impact of these regulations in detail. Orientation ses- 
sions will also be helpful in understanding CIS and DoS regulations. 

Scholarships are not usually available to non-immigrant applicants; however, students 
may contact the academic department to which they have applied to determine the availability 
of assistantships or scholarships. Availability is highly competitive and interested candidates 
should make contact immediately. Scholarships are not available through the ISSO. Interna- 
tional students are classified as non-residents of North Carolina and are assessed non- 
resident (out-of-state) tuition and fees. 

F-l non-immigrants are not eligible to work off-campus without an approval from the 
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. It is also necessary to apply for a Social Security 
card which could take up to two months to process and be received. Work on campus, after the 
Social Security card has been received, is a possibility and requires that international students 
maintain legal status at all times. F-2 and H-4 non-immigrants are not eligible to work. J-2 
dependents can apply to the USCIS for work authorization. Students should contact the 
ISSO regarding eligibility to work after enrolling in classes. 

Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 37 



The ISSO is located on the corner of Nocho Street and S. G. Thomas Drive in Room 221 
Murphy Hall. Phone (336) 334-7551, Fax (336) 334-7001. Please visit the webpage at 
www.ncat.edu/~isso . The e-mail address is isso@ncat.edu. 

Non immigrant students are required to maintain comprehensive health and accident in- 
surance coverage that includes repatriation and medical evacuation. Students must purchase 
insurance on a semester basis during registration. The University offers an acceptable plan. 
Government sponsored students and students with pre-existing medical conditions should con- 
sult the ISSO advisor immediately regarding coverage. Non-immigrant students who fail 
to provide proof of adequate insurance by the end of the regular registration period will be 
considered out of status. This school is authorized under Federal Law to enroll nonimmigrant 
students. 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

The School of Graduate Studies offers programs of study leading to the master's degree in 
43 fields and the doctorate in three fields. Each student's program is planned with an advisory 
committee of graduate faculty members to provide the opportunity for gaining advanced knowl- 
edge in the particular field of study. Graduate education is the final stage in the development of 
intellectual independence. It is different from undergraduate education in that the student is 
encouraged to establish premises, to hypothesize, and to defend both the procedure and the 
conclusions of independent investigation. The burden of proof for the verifiability of knowl- 
edge rests on the student, not on the faculty member. Emphasis is placed upon the student's 
scholarly development through formal course work, seminars, research, and independent in- 
vestigation. 

Graduate students are expected to familiarize themselves with the requirements for the 
degrees for which they are candidates and are held responsible for the fulfillment of these 
requirements. 

Master's Degrees 

The School of Graduate Studies offers programs of study leading to the Master of 
Science degree, Master of Arts degree, Master of Arts in Education, Master of Arts in 
Teaching, Master of Science in Industrial Technology degree, Master of School Adminis- 
tration, Master of Science in Management, and Master of Social Work degree. 

Requirements for Master's Degrees 

Graduate Advisor and Graduate Advisory Committee 

All students in master's programs must have a graduate advisor who is a member of the 
Graduate Faculty in the student's major department or program. The graduate advisor is ap- 
pointed by the Coordinator of Graduate Programs. In addition, all students must have a gradu- 
ate advisory committee. The advisory committee is composed of at least three members of the 
Graduate Faculty. The graduate advisor serves as chair or co-chair of the committee. The graduate 
advisory committee is appointed by the Coordinator of Graduate Programs in the student's 
department or program. At the time of the request for a permit to schedule the final oral exami- 
nation, the School of Graduate Studies verifies that the committee is properly constituted. 

Plan of Graduate Work 

The master's degree candidate must submit an approved Plan of Graduate Work to the 
School of Graduate Studies during the term in which the candidate will complete 15 or more 



38 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



credits toward the degree sought. If the 15 credits will be completed at the end of a regular 
semester, the Plan of Graduate Work must be submitted to the School of Graduate Studies 
Office five working days before registration for the following semester. If the 15 credits will be 
completed at the end of the summer session, the Plan of Graduate Work should be filed in the 
^School of Graduate Studies within five working days following fall registration. The Plan of 
Graduate Work lists the committee chairperson, other committee members, and a sequence of 
courses required for the degree and approved by the student's advisor. Each committee member's 
signature indicates approval of the Plan of Graduate Work. Upon approval by the School of 
Graduate Studies, the Plan becomes the student's official guide to completing his/her program. 
Any changes in the Plan of Graduate Work or exceptions to the schedule for submission of the 
Plan must be approved by the committee and the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. 

Declaration of Major 

A graduate student shall declare and complete the requirements of one master's degree 
program before declaring another major. This does not prevent a student from changing a dec- 
laration of major. 

Time Limitation 

The master's degree program must be completed within six successive calendar years. 
Programs remaining incomplete after this time interval are subject to cancellation, revision, or 
special examination for out-dated work. Students enrolled in doctoral programs should see the 
appropriate section of the Graduate Catalog for details regarding the maximum time allowed 
to complete the degree programs. When the program of study is interrupted because the student 
has been drafted into the armed services, the time limit shall be extended for the length of time 
the student shall have been on active duty, if the candidate resumes graduate work no later than 
one year following his/her release from military service. 

Course Levels 

At the University, the department prefix, followed by a three-digit number, is used to 
designate all course offerings. The first digit indicates the classification level of the course. 
Courses numbered 600 through 699 are open to seniors and to graduate students. Courses 
numbered 700 and above are open only to graduate students. At least 50% of the courses counted 
in the work towards a master's degree must be those open only to graduate students; that is, 
numbered 700 and above. 

Credits 

A minimum of 30 semester credit hours is required for most master's degrees; however, 
some programs require more than 30. Also, in order to gain the breadth desired in their program 
or to make up deficits in their undergraduate degree, many students will actually take more 
credit hours than the minimum required by the program. 

Residence Requirements 

A minimum of three-fourths of the hours required for the master's degree must be earned 
in residence study at the University. 

Transfer of Credit 

No more than six hours of the minimal 30-hour requirement will be accepted from other 
institutions. A graduate course which has been completed with a grade of "B" or better may be 
considered for transfer to a master's program provided that it has been completed in a graduate 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 39 



or post-baccalaureate classification at an accredited graduate school. Exceptions are allowed for 
transfer from foreign institutions if the department or program provides the School of Graduate 
Studies with adequate documentation that the course is relevant to the degree, with appropriate 
content and level of instruction resulting in student competencies at least comparable to those of 
students taking the equivalent course at North Carolina A&T State University, and that the course 
was taught by faculty who are qualified to teach at the master's degree level. Credit accepted by 
extension reduces the amount of credit that may be transferred from other institutions. 

Transfer of Undergraduate Credit 

Graduate credit may be allowed for up to 6 hours of the minimal 30-hour requirement for 
courses taken at North Carolina A&T State University provided that it is at the 600 level or 
higher, that the grade is "B" or better, that it was not counted to fulfill undergraduate require- 
ments, and that it is recommended by the student's undergraduate advisor prior to enrollment 
in the course. No graduate credit will be allowed for excess credits completed in an under- 
graduate classification at another institution. 

Credits from Previous North Carolina A&T State University Master's Degree 

Only 12 credits from a previous North Carolina A&T State University master's degree 
may be counted toward the minimal 30-hour requirement. 

Language Requirements 

A reading knowledge of one foreign language is required by some programs for the Mas- 
ter of Arts and the Master of Science degrees. Other departments may designate that the lan- 
guage requirement be fulfilled from among those languages in which the Department of Foreign 
Languages conducts testing. Students should contact the major department for specific lan- 
guage requirements. 

Thesis 

Theses prepared by candidates for the Master of Science and Master of Arts degrees, in 
programs requiring the thesis, must present an original investigation into a subject which has 
been approved by the student's advisory committee and the Coordinator of Graduate Programs 
in the student's major. Four copies of the thesis in final form as approved by the advisory 
committee, each signed by the members of the advisory committee, must be submitted to the 
School of Graduate Studies by a specific deadline in the semester or summer session in which 
the degree is to be conferred. Detailed information on the form and organization of the thesis is 
presented in the Graduate School's Thesis and Dissertation Manual, which is available in the 
School of Graduate Studies Office or on the website at http://www.ncat.edu/ . 

Final Comprehensive Examination 

Students enrolled in a master's degree program or a doctoral degree program may be tested 
by a comprehensive examination to determine the student's knowledge and skills in a general 
subject area of concentration. The comprehensive examination date will be announced by the 
departmental graduate committee chairperson at the beginning of the semester. This examina- 
tion will be administered to the enrolled student by an examining committee of the department. 
Eligibility to sit for the examination will be determined by the departmental graduate commit- 
tee and the results of the examination will be forwarded to the School of Graduate Studies no 
later than 30 days prior to the end of the semester. Students may only take the comprehensive 
examination twice. 



40 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



After a second failure, the student must petition the Coordinator of Graduate Programs 
and the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies for approval to take the exam a third time. If 
the student is unsuccessful after the third attempt, the student is dismissed from the Graduate 

! Program. 

I 

| Comprehensive Final Oral Examination 

Candidates for master's degrees must pass a comprehensive oral examination to demon- 
strate to the advisory committee that he/she possesses a reasonable mastery of the subject 
matter of the major and supporting fields and that this knowledge can be used with promptness 
and accuracy. This examination may not be held until all other requirements, except comple- 
I tion of the course work in current registration during the final semester, are satisfied. A request 
I for a permit to schedule the examination may be filed with the Dean of the School of Graduate 
1 Studies after the above conditions are met. The School of Graduate Studies will check to deter- 
i mine that the advisory committee and the courses taken by the student meet the requirements. 
i If all requirements are met, the permit to schedule the final examination will be forwarded to 
the Director of Graduate Programs within 20 days of receipt of the request. Upon receipt of the 
permit, the student may proceed to schedule the exam at a time that is convenient to all mem- 
bers of the advisory committee. In those programs that require the thesis, the thesis must be 
submitted in complete form, except for such revisions necessary as a result of the final exam, to 
all members of the advisory committee at least two weeks prior to the exam. 

A unanimous vote of approval of the advisory committee is required to pass the oral ex- 
amination. Approval of the examination may be conditional, however, upon completion of 
: additional work to the satisfaction of the advisory committee. A formal reexamination will not 
I be required in this case. Failure of a student to pass the oral examination terminates the student's 
I graduate work at North Carolina A&T State University, unless the graduate advisory commit- 
l tee unanimously recommends a reexamination. Only one reexamination will be given. A form 
I giving the date that the exam was conducted and the result of the examination, signed by all 
members of the advisory committee, is forwarded to the Dean of the School of Graduate Stud- 
ies by the Coordinator of Graduate programs in the student's department or program. A student 
may appeal all committee actions by written application to the Dean of the School of Graduate 
Studies. 

Oral examinations for master's degree candidates are open to the Graduate Faculty by 
right and to the University community by unanimous consent of the advisory committee and 
the student being examined. Discussions and decisions regarding the student's performance 
are private to the advisory committee. 

Summary of Procedures for Master's Degrees 

ALL STUDENTS 

• Application materials and required fees must be received. 

• Application materials must be reviewed by department or program. 

• The department or program must forward its recommendation regarding applicant's 
admissibility to the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. 

• The School of Graduate Studies must review the recommendation and the student is 
notified of the action taken on the request for admission. 

• The student must report to the department or program, be assigned a graduate advi- 
sor, and develop a roster of courses and credits with the advisor. 

• The student must comply with requests from the School of Graduate Studies for up- 
dated copies of transcripts from previous colleges or universities. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 4 1 



• The student must sign a patent agreement and file with the School of Graduate Stud- 
ies. 

• The student is subject to continuous registration policy until graduation. 

• The student must pass a language examination, if required. 

• The student must pass a written examination, if required. 

• The student must submit a diploma order form by end of the sixth week of the semes- 
ter or summer session of anticipated graduation. 

• An overall grade point average of at least 3.0 must be maintained for all graduate 
coursework taken at North Carolina A&T State University to graduate. 

All degree requirements must be completed within six calendar years, beginning with the 
date the student commences courses carrying graduate credit applicable to the degree program, 
unless a more restrictive time limit has been established by the department/program or aca- 
demic college/school. 

Students in Non-Thesis Programs 

• A graduate advisory committee of three or more Graduate Faculty members must be 
appointed by the Coordinator of Graduate Programs. 

• A Plan of Graduate Work must be prepared by the student, in consultation with and 
with the approval of his/her graduate advisory committee. This plan must be approved 
by the Coordinator of Graduate Programs prior to completion of one-half the credits 
on the plan. 

• When all requirements except completion of the course work in the final semester are 
satisfied, the Coordinator of Graduate Programs must request that the School of Gradu- 
ate Studies issue a permit to schedule the final oral examination. 

• If the School of Graduate Studies requirements are met, a permit to schedule the final 
examination will be issued within 20 working days of receipt of the request. 

• The final examination must be scheduled and conducted. 

• The final examination report, including date and result of the examination, must be 
submitted to the School of Graduate Studies by the Coordinator of Graduate Pro- 
grams. This report should be received within five working days of the examination. 

Students in Thesis Programs 

• Graduate advisory committee of three or more Graduate Faculty members must be 
appointed by the Coordinator of Graduate Programs. 

• A Plan of Graduate Work must be prepared by the student, in consultation with and 
with the approval of his/her graduate advisory committee. This plan must be approved 
by the Coordinator of Graduate Programs prior to completion of one-half the credits 
on the plan. 

• A copy of a preliminary draft of the thesis, if required, must be submitted to the chair 
of the student's advisory committee. 

• When all requirements except completion of the course work in the final semester are 
satisfied and after the thesis is complete except for such revisions as may be neces- 
sary as a result of the exam, the Coordinator of Graduate Programs will request that 
the School of Graduate Studies issue a permit to schedule the final oral examination. 

• If all requirements are met, a permit to schedule the final examination is issued by the 
School of Graduate Studies within 20 working days of receipt of the request. 



42 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



• At least two weeks prior to the final oral examination, the chair of the student's advi- 
sory committee must submit the thesis to the other members of the advisory commit- 
tee for review. 

• The final examination must be scheduled and conducted. 

• The final examination report, including the date and result of the examination, must 
be submitted to the School of Graduate Studies by the Coordinator of Graduate Pro- 
grams. The report should be received by the School of Graduate Studies within five 
working days after the examination. 

• The student must submit four copies of the thesis, signed by each member of his/her 
advisory committee, to the School of Graduate Studies. 

• The deadline date for submitting four copies of the thesis to the School of Graduate 
Studies for the student to graduate in a given semester or summer session appears in 
The Academic Calendar in this catalog as well as in other School of Graduate Studies 
calendars . 

• The defended thesis is reviewed by the School of Graduate Studies to ensure that the 
format conforms with the specifications prescribed in the Thesis and Dissertation 
Manual. 

Requirements for Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

The doctorate symbolizes the ability of the recipient to undertake original research and 
scholarly work at the highest levels without supervision. The degree is, therefore, not granted 
simply upon completion of a stated amount of course work but rather upon demonstration by 
the student of a comprehensive knowledge and high attainment in scholarship in a specialized 
field of study. The student must demonstrate this ability by writing a dissertation reporting the 
results of an original investigation and by passing a series of comprehensive examinations in 
the field of specialization. 

Advisory Committee and Plan of Graduate Work 

An advisory committee of at least four Graduate Faculty members, one of whom will be 
designated as chair, will be appointed by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies upon the 
recommendation of the Chairperson of the department. The committee, which must include at 
least one representative of the minor field, will, with the student, prepare a Plan of Graduate 
Work that must be approved by the department and the School of Graduate Studies. In addition 
to the course work to be undertaken, the subject of the student's dissertation must appear on the 
plan. Any subsequent changes in the committee or dissertation subject or in the overall plan 
must be submitted for approval as with the original plan. 

The program of study must be unified, and all constituent parts must contribute to an 
organized program of study and research. Courses must be selected from groups embracing 
one principal subject of concentration, the major, and from a cognate field, the minor. 

Residence Requirement 

For the Doctor of Philosophy degree, the student is expected to be registered for graduate 
work at an accredited graduate school for at least six semesters beyond the baccalaureate degree. 

The basic University residence requirements are defined below. However, the College of 
Engineering has the prerogative of establishing more restrictive requirements within the re- 
spective programs. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 43 



Language Requirement 

The departments may designate that the language requirement be fulfilled from among 
those languages in which the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures conduct test- 
ing. Doctoral students should contact the major department for specific language requirements. 

Preliminary Comprehensive Examinations 

After completing the language requirement, but not earlier than the end of the second year 
of graduate study, and not later than one semester (four months) before the final oral examina- 
tion, each doctoral student is required to take the preliminary comprehensive examination. The 
examinations consist of two parts: written examination and an oral examination. 

The written portion may be conducted in one of two ways. In the first, each member of the 
advisory committee prepares a set of questions for the student's response, and answers to each 
set are returned to the appropriate member for grading. In the second, the Department prepares 
a single exam that is graded by a faculty committee. 

The examination questions involved may cover any phase of the course work taken by the 
student during graduate study or any subject logically related to an understanding of the sub- 
ject matter in the major and minor areas of study. The questions are designed to measure the 
student's mastery of the subject matter and the adequacy of preparation for research. Failure to 
pass the written preliminary examination terminates the student's work at this institution, sub- 
ject to departmental and/or school policies with respect to reexamination. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the written portion of the preliminary examinations and 
after completion of all course work relevant to the examination, authorization for the prelimi- 
nary oral examination is requested from the School of Graduate Studies. This examination is 
conducted by the student's advisory committee and a representative from the School of Gradu- 
ate Studies and is open to all Graduate Faculty members. The oral examination is designed to 
test the student's ability to relate factual knowledge to specific circumstances, to use this knowl- 
edge with accuracy and promptness, and to demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the 
field of specialization and related areas. 

A unanimous vote of approval by the members of the advisory committee is required for 
the student to pass the preliminary oral examination. Approval may be conditional, however, 
on the successful completion of additional work in some particular field(s). All committee 
actions may be appealed by written application to the Graduate Dean. 

Failure to pass the preliminary oral examination terminates the student's work at the Uni- 
versity unless the examining committee recommends a reexamination. No reexamination may 
be given until at least one full semester has elapsed, and only one reexamination is permitted. 

Candidacy 

A doctoral student is admitted to candidacy upon passing the preliminary examinations 
without conditions or after fulfilling any conditions specified by the advisory committee. 

Qualifying Examination 

This is a written examination that is required of all Ph.D. students and is scheduled each 
semester. The qualifying examination must be passed prior to the end of the third semester. 
Provisional students cannot sit for the qualifying examination. They must first gain a status 
change to unconditional admission. Students should consult the departmental handbook for 
details. 



44 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Preliminary Examination 

The preliminary examination is given in the semester following completion of all required 
coursework. In this oral examination, the student is asked about graduate course work and 
isubject matter related to the specialization. It is also a presentation and defense of the proposed 
; dissertation topic. Students should consult the departmental handbook for details. 

i 

Admission to Candidacy 

Admission to candidacy is given once the student has completed and passed all parts of the 
preliminary examination. Students should consult the departmental handbook for details. 

Final Oral Examination 

The final oral examination is scheduled after the dissertation is complete. It consists of the 
I defense of the methodology used and the conclusion reached in the research. Students should 
consult the departmental handbook for details. 

Dissertation Submission 

The doctoral dissertation presents the results of the student's original investigation in the 
field of major interest. It must be a contribution to knowledge, must be adequately supported 
by data and must be written in a manner consistent with the highest standards of scholarship. 
Publication is expected. 

Upon passing the Ph.D. final oral examination, each Ph.D. student must have the disserta- 
tion approved by each member of the student's advisory committee. The defended dissertation 
] must be submitted to the School of Graduate Studies by the deadline given in the academic 
. calendar, and must conform to the School of Graduate Studies' Thesis and Dissertation Manual, 
la copy of which may be obtained from the School of Graduate Studies Office. Once final 
i approval is granted, four copies of the document signed by all members of the student's advi- 
sory committee must be submitted to the School of Graduate Studies by a specified deadline in 
the semester or summer session in which the degree is to be conferred. 

The University has a requirement that all doctoral dissertations be microfilmed by Univer- 
sity Microfilms International of Ann Arbor, Michigan, which includes publication of the ab- 
stract in Dissertation Abstracts International. The student is required to pay for the microfilming 
service. 

I Residence Requirement and Doctor of Philosophy Time Limit 

Two semesters of residence credits must be earned. In addition, the doctoral student has a 
maximum of six calendar years from admission to attain candidacy and ten calendar years to 
complete all requirements. The dissertation must be completed in five years after admission to 
candidacy. Students should consult the departmental handbook for details. 

Credit Completion Requirements 

A minimum of 24 course credits and 12 dissertation credits beyond the Master of Science 
are required. Students should consult the departmental handbook for details. 

Interinstitutional Doctor of Philosophy Program 

North Carolina A&T State University, North Carolina State University and the University 
of North Carolina at Charlotte all participate in an interinstitutional Ph.D. program. Students 
seeking admission to such a cooperative program must satisfy all admission and degree 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 45 



requirements at the university where the Ph.D. will be issued as well as those of the student's 
home institution. Details are available at each of the departments involved in the interinstitu- 
tional Ph.D. program. 

Summary of Procedures for Doctor of Philosophy 

• Application materials and the required fee are received. 

• Application materials are reviewed by the department or program. 

• The department or program forwards its recommendation regarding applicant's ad- 
missibility to Dean of the School of Graduate Studies 

• The School of Graduate Studies reviews the recommendation and notifies the student 
of the action taken on the request for admission. 

• The student arrives, reports to the department or program, is assigned a graduate 
advisor, and develops a roster of courses and credits with the advisor. 

• The student complies with requests from the School of Graduate Studies for updated 
copies of transcripts from previous colleges or universities. 

• The student is subject to the continuous registration policy until graduation. 

• An advisory committee of at least four graduate faculty members is appointed by the 
Dean of the School of Graduate Studies upon the recommendation of the coordinator 
of graduate programs. 

• The Dean of the School of Graduate Studies appoints a representative to the student's 
committee. 

• A dissertation subject is selected and an outline of the proposed research submitted to 
the student's advisory committee and the coordinator of graduate programs for re- 
view and approval. A Plan of Graduate Work is prepared by the student, in consulta- 
tion with and with the approval of his/her graduate advisory committee and the 
coordinator of graduate programs, and forwarded to the School of Graduate Studies 
for approval as soon as feasible after completion of 12 hours of course work. 

• Written examinations in the major and minor fields are scheduled no earlier than the 
end of the second year of graduate study and not later than one semester before the 
final oral examination. 

• When all written examinations have been completed satisfactorily, the chair or the 
coordinator of graduate programs requests the scheduling of the preliminary oral ex- 
amination at least two weeks prior to the suggested date. 

• The report of the examination is sent to the School of Graduate Studies and if, the 
examination has been passed without conditions, the student is admitted to candi- 
dacy. 

• A copy of the preliminary draft of the dissertation is submitted to the chair of the 
student's advisory committee for review. 

• At least two weeks prior to the final oral examination, the chair of the student's advi- 
sory committee submits the dissertation to advisory committee members for review. 
A copy is submitted to the School of Graduate Studies representative at least one 
week prior to the exam. 

• One semester or its equivalent after admission to candidacy or later, after the disser- 
tation is complete except for such revisions as may be necessary as a result of the 
final examination, and at least two weeks prior to the suggested date, the student's 
advisory committee chair or the director of graduate programs requests the schedul- 
ing of the final oral examination. Upon approval of the request, the student and the 
examining committee, including the Graduate School representative, are notified of 
the time and place of the examination. 

• Results of the final oral examination are forwarded to the School of Graduate Studies. 



46 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



• Upon the student's passing the final oral examination, four copies of the dissertation 
signed by each member of the student's advisory committee and five copies of the 
abstract must be submitted to the Graduate School by a specific deadline in the se- 
mester or summer session in which the degree is to be conferred. One copy each of 
the University Microfilms Agreement, the Survey of Earned Doctorate, and the Gradu- 
ate School Exit Survey forms must be completed and submitted with the dissertation. 

• The defended dissertation is reviewed by the School of Graduate Studies to ensure 
that the format conforms to the specifications prescribed in the Thesis and Disserta- 
tion Manual. 

• All course work scheduled in a graduate degree classification must be completed 
prior to graduation. 

• A grade point average of at least 3 .0 for the degree requirements as well as on overall 
graduate course work at North Carolina A&T State University is required for gradu- 
ation. 

• The doctoral residence requirement must be satisfied. All degree requirements must 
be completed within ten years from admission to the doctoral program. 

THE NORTH CAROLINA A&T STATE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

Ferdinand Douglass Bluford Library 

Ferdinand Douglass Bluford Library is located near the center of the West campus. The 
current holdings include more than 566,000 bound volumes, over 34,000 e-books, and as a 
select depository in North Carolina for United States government documents, the library con- 
tains a collection of over 276,000 official government publications. Current serials include 
approximately 40,089 print and electronic subscriptions. Other holdings include a collection of 
videotapes, microforms, and other audiovisuals. The Library maintains special collections in 
Archives, Black Studies and Teacher Education materials. 

Special services are provided through formal and informal library instructional programs, 
document delivery, interlibrary loans, and laptop checkouts. During the academic year, the 
library is open each week as shown below. Variations in this schedule are posted at the front 
entrance of the library. 

Sunday - 2:00 p.m. with 24-hour service until Friday, 8:00 p.m. 
Saturday - 10:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m. 

OFFICE OF SUMMER SESSIONS AND OUTREACH 

The Summer Sessions are an integral part of the regular University program and are 
administered by the regular staff augmented in several fields by visiting faculty. The standards 
of academic achievement, including the courses and the quality of work required in them, are 
maintained at the same level as during the regular terms. Credits obtained and times spent are 
recognized fully toward meeting residence requirements for graduation. 

Students interested in attending a Summer Session must complete a separate application 
and have a current year FAFSA on file. Students generally receive the Pell Grant and/or the 
Federal Direct Student Loan, if there is remaining eligibility. All students must attend the first, 
dual sessions or first and second sessions to be eligible for aid. A student must be enrolled at 
least half-time to receive loan assistance. 

The Summer Sessions consist of two 5-week sessions, one 10-week session and one two- 
week session, with short courses and workshops offered at various times throughout the ses- 
sions. This program provides daily summer study to meet the needs of graduate and 
undergraduate degree- seeking students, teachers, and other professionals, or any other persons 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 47 



whom summer study will benefit in the attainment of their educational goals. Persons who: 
have not been accepted into the School of Graduate Studies, but wish to take courses in a | 
Summer Session, must complete an application and pay the application fee before registering ;i 
for the course. 

The Outreach component seeks to provide a broad base of support, through collaborative 
initiatives with the various units on the campus, for pre-college activities for youth that support 
learning, discovery and engagement in the greater university community. The Office partners : 
with public and private schools in and around the Greensboro area in order to support teacher 
training and promote interdisciplinary learning experiences at all levels. 

OFFICE OF CONTINUING STUDIES 

The Office of Continuing Studies provides the administrative structure and coordination 
of extension credit courses, conferences, workshops, and short courses. The staff works with" 
faculty and community groups to develop learning activities to meet the educational needs of 
individuals or groups. Special emphasis is given to technical certification programs leading to 
certification in several fields. 

MAJOR RESEARCH CENTERS AND INSTITUTES 

Center for Aerospace Research 

The primary mission of the Center of Aerospace Research is to conduct high quality re- 
search in aeronautics and astronautics. The core research themes are Aerospace Structures, 
Controls, and Guidance; Computational Fluid Dynamics; Propulsion; and Human-Machine 
Engineering. The education component supports an aerospace option in the mechanical engi- 
neering curriculum. The Center performs critical research that contributes to the development 
of technology necessary to support the development of NASA's High Speed Civil Transport 
programs and the improvement of the Single and Two State to Orbit missions. Ongoing re- 
search efforts are directed towards the support of NASA's exploration of space and long-term 
human presence in space, as well as enhancement of life of Earth. Researchers are actively 
developing capabilities in the areas of space station design and management and micro-gravity 
materials research. 

Center for Electronics Manufacturing 

The goal of the Center is to strengthen the manufacturing, service, and research arm of the 
electronics manufacturing industry with respect to productivity, quality, and timeliness of product 
and service delivered. Specifically, the Center focuses on (a) the need to reduce time to service 
or market, (b) the need to access leading manufacturing technologies while reducing invest- 
ments, (c) the need to focus on core competencies, and (d) the need to improve inventory 
management and purchasing power. This program develops expertise in each of the areas of 
electronics, manufacturing, safety, the environment, design, quality, computing, and manage- 
ment. 

Center for Composite Materials Research 

Research with polymeric-based composite materials at North Carolina A&T State Univer- 
sity was started in 1976. The present Center was established in 1988 formally as a center of 
excellence in composite materials. The major facilities are the Computational Laboratory, 
Mechanical Testing Laboratory, Diagnostic Laboratory, and Composite Processing and Fabri- 
cation Laboratory. Research activities are focused on (a) processing and fabrication of simple 
to complex composite components (autoclave, compression molding, resin transfer molding, 



48 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



and composite structural components); (b) use of textile fiber architectures in the fabrication of 
non-trivial light weight composite components (braids, plain weaves, etc.); (c) testing and char- 
acterization of composite materials; (d) analysis of composite structural components; (e) study 
of cost-effective near net-shaped composite components; (f) development of innovative pro- 
cessing techniques with textile fabrics (small ablative nozzles, integrally blade-stiffened pan- 
els, box sections, etc.); and (g) training of students and engineers from industry in the fabrication 
and use of composites. 

Center for Advanced Materials and Smart Structures 

The Center for Advanced Materials and Smart Structures (CAMSS) is an educational and 
research resource for the State of North Carolina and the nation in the field of advanced ce- 
ramic materials and their composites. It is a collaboration of academe, private industry and the 
government in developing basic and applied research programs with a focus on an integration 
of research and education. The Center's interdisciplinary and integrated approach provides a 
rich collection of outcomes for the institutions involved and for the engineering infrastructure 
in general. Basic research in the technical thrust areas (advanced ceramics, advanced compos- 
ites, electronic ceramic devices, sensors and smart structures and III-V nitrides, ohmic con- 
tracts and devices) drives the Center's activities. 

Center for Energy Research and Technology 

The mission of the Center is to enhance undergraduate and graduate education through 
energy-related research and to transfer this new knowledge to regional and national industries. 
The objective is to improve economic competitiveness while reducing the environmental im- 
pact that results from excessive energy consumption. The research focuses on energy use and 
energy efficiency in buildings and industrial processes as they relate to technological, eco- 
nomic, political and environmental issues. 

Civil Infrastructure Research Institute 

The Institute conducts materials characterization, materials testing, load modeling, and 
structural health and durability research on concrete pavement materials and aircraft runway 
paving structures. The objective is to determine full-scale validation of airport pavement using 
field instrumentation and computer simulation, more accurate evaluation of asphalt and con- 
crete elastic and visco-elastic properties, and more accurate simulation of the loading of new, 
heavier airplanes' landing gear on airfield pavements. Its major research efforts are concen- 
trated at the Piedmont Triad International Airport in preparation for the proposed FedEx Mid- 
Atlantic Hub, but other focus areas are (1) the structural health and durability of bridges and 
highways and (2) dredging technology. 

Institute for Human-Machine Studies 

The field of human-machine system engineering emphasizes how users interact with ma- 
chines, how usable machines are to users, and the impact of machines on user performance. 
The Institute is a comprehensive multi-disciplinary program of basic and applied scientific 
research and technology development directed toward the understanding of the nature of hu- 
man performance while interacting with complex technology-driven systems. It focuses on 
cognitive engineering and human-system interface sciences, aviation and transportation hu- 
man factors, information and communication technology integration, and healthcare and manu- 
facturing applications. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 49 



Interdisciplinary Center for Entrepreneurship and E-Business 

The Interdisciplinary Center for Entrepreneurship and E-Business (ICEEB) is dedicated! 
to developing the entrepreneurial spirit at North Carolina A&T State University. The ICEEB J 
provides academic and experiential learning experiences for students interested in individual 1 
or corporate entrepreneurship and for local entrepreneurs interested in improving their busi- 
nesses. The center's main goals are to promote entrepreneurship as a career option, to increase 
student participation in e-business, to provide an entrepreneurial environment and opportuni- 
ties for students to successfully start their entrepreneurial careers, and to encourage and sup- 
port research in entrepreneurship and e-business. ICEEB is a joint project of the School of 
Business and Economics, the School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, and the School 
of Technology. Located in the School of Business and Economics, the center collaborates with 
various schools and colleges to offer students the Certificate in Entrepreneurship, an Entrepre- 
neurship Mentoring Program, a Virtual Incubator, a Business Plan Competition, the Entrepre- 
neurial Internship, and a Lecture Series. 

Center for Autonomous Control and Information Technology 

The areas of concentration are soft computing, multiagent systems, artificial intelligence 
in general, control theory, genetic algorithms, and energy conservation and power electronics. 
The Center conducts interdisciplinary research in demonstrative programs for the application 
of fuzzy logic-controlled power electronic building block systems in HVAC systems, nonlinear 
active control of dynamic systems, artificial potential field based motion planning/navigation 
in two- and three-dimensional dynamic environments, and other relevant topics. 

North Carolina Agromedicine Institute 

The NC Agromedicine Institute is a scientifically based organization whose focus is on 
environmental and occupational health and safety issues of agricultural, forestry, and fisheries 
producers, workers and their families. Its mission is to promote the health and safety of agricul- 
tural, forestry, and fisheries communities through research, education, and outreach. 

Center for International Trade 

The primary mission of the Center is to stimulate economic development and international 
trade. The educational activities are principally aimed at teaching students and providing re- 
search and related materials to small businesses as well as technical assistance and information 
to the agricultural business community. Program emphases include (a) developing educational 
programs to enable farmers and processors to produce a broader range of products to boost 
local economic performance; (b) identifying alternative markets; (c) enhancing understanding 
of the linkages among national economies, world markets, and agriculture; (d) conducting 
market-based research to understand factors that influence competitiveness; (e) educating pro- 
ducers, processors, and other clients about trade policies, regulations, and world economic and 
political trends affecting U.S. trade competitiveness; and (f) developing programs of North 
Carolina's rural communities to enhance entrepreneurial skills, create jobs, and diversify their 
economies. 

Transportation Institute 

The mission of the Transportation Institute is to coordinate and manage interdisciplinary 
research, training, and technology transfer activities involving faculty, staff and students from 
various departments within the University. The activities of the Institute include soliciting ex- 
tramural funding; coordinating faculty development and student enrichment programs; facili- 
tating technology transfer; providing technical assistance and public service; and coordinating 



50 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



other transportation related programs. The Transportation Institute functions as a national and 
y regional center for research and training and as an information clearinghouse. 

, Waste Management Institute 

The Waste Management Institute is an interdisciplinary program that is designed to en- 
3 hance awareness and understanding of waste management problems in our society and to en- 
hance instruction, research, and outreach aimed at improving the quality of life and protecting 
' the environment. The goals of the Institute are to increase the number of professionals in envi- 
ti ronmental and waste management, to enhance interdisciplinary research, to increase public 
' awareness, and to facilitate cooperative and exchange programs among students, faculty, gov- 
ii ernment, and industry. 

National Institute of Aerospace 

The Institute conducts and promotes leading-edge aerospace and atmospheric sciences 
research and develops innovative new technologies in the following seven technical areas: (1) 
revolutionary aerospace systems, concepts and analysis; (2) planetary capture and entry tech- 
i nology; (3) aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, and acoustics; (4) structures and materials; 
i (5) airborne systems; (6) atmospheric and vehicle sensor system technology; and (7) atmo- 
i spheric chemistry and radiation science. 
i 

SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION 
TECHNOLOGY AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS (IT&T) 

The Division of Information Technology and Telecommunications (IT&T) at North Caro- 
lina Agricultural and Technical State University Provides assistance to faculty, students, staff, 
and the community for promoting curricula development, new learning environments powered 
by technology, administrative and student support services and research activities. IT&T deliv- 
ers academic and administrative support services by using the power of information technol- 
ogy to create and sustain a learner-centered community. 

The Division of Information Technology and Telecommunications is divided into ten ar- 
eas: Academy for Teaching and Learning (ATL), Administrative Information Systems (AIS), 
Center for Distance Learning (CDL), Research Computing (RC), Special Projects and Pro- 
grams (SPP), Student Technical Services (STS), Systems and Networking (SN), Teaching and 
Learning Systems (TLS), Telecommunications & Client Services (TCS) and Web Support Ser- 
vices (WSS). In addition, IT&T provides media services to the learner-centered community of 
Greensboro and the surrounding areas through three major information delivery methods that 
include WNAA-FM Radio Station, The Campus Television Studio, and five video conferencing 
sites. WNAA-FM Radio provides on-air educational, cultural and entertainment programs to 
the learner-centered community of Greensboro and the surrounding areas. The station's cul- 
tural, educational and entertainment programs serve as a venue for faculty, students and staff to 
develop and showcase their creative work, skills and talents to the community as subject area 
experts. The Television Studio located in Crosby Hall is a major instructional video production 
center for faculty and students. It serves as a training site for communications majors and 
produce special event video projects for the university as well as promotional tapes, multicamera 
productions of theatrical plays and coverage of Honors' Day Convocation and commencement 
activities. To date, the University has five electronically connected videoconferencing sites for 
delivering voice, video and text simultaneously. McNair Hall, Center for Distance Learning, 
the Academy for Teaching and Learning, Smith Hall and Stallings Memorial Ball Room are 
connected with videoconferencing units that have multi-site and natural video functionality. 
The videoconferencing sites create a collaborative information dissemination system for en- 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 5 1 



hancing faculty research and teaching along interdisciplinary lines by allowing both students 
and faculty from every discipline to interface with programs and activities shared through 
internet-satellite videoconferencing. The sites also provide administrative support services 
through workshops, seminars and conferences that are shared with other institutions of higher 
education, government agencies and philanthropic organizations. 

The Directorate of the Academy for Teaching and Learning (ATL) is responsible for 
promoting and coordinating the scholarship of teaching and learning through effective use of 
pedagogy with learning technologies. ATL provides instructional consultation, classroom and 
laboratory observation, assessment and evaluation of instruction, and conducts action research. 
In addition, ATL implements various technologies in delivering instruction such as distance 
learning, teleclassrooms, teleconferences, and videotaping of instruction. 

The Directorate of Administrative Information Systems (AIS) is responsible for central 
administrative computing and related information management activities for the University. 
AIS develops, maintains, and/or provides technical support for the campus financial, human 
resources, alumni and student information systems as well as appropriate computing for other 
administrative functions in academic and administrative units. AIS support the University's 
mission of instruction, research, and public service by implementing, enhancing, and support- 
ing administrative systems. AIS' focus is easy access to secure, reliable, and timely data. AIS is 
committed to retaining quality staff, investigating new technologies, and partnering with oth- 
ers to provide technical leadership and effective solutions. 

The Center for Distance Learning (CDL) is responsible for both traditional and non- 
traditional students in implementing programs and courses to meet their educational needs 
without extended stays on campus. Courses are offered at a distance through online and exten- 
sion programs. Students and instructors can interact via online discussion groups, email, streamed 
videos, and on-site instruction. CDL serves as a mechanism by which North Carolina Agricul- 
tural and Technical State University can achieve its academic goals by developing innovative 
instructional programs that will meet the needs of a diverse student population. 

The Directorate of Research Computing (RC) supports a variety of services aimed at 
improving the quality of research through the application of technology. The services consist 
of providing installation, operation and maintenance of information systems labs, electronic 
collaboration, technical support of research projects and consulting services. Additionally this 
includes optimized utilization and operational enhancements of the computing requirements 
for improving our research infrastructure. This will also allow an interdisciplinary approach 
for centralization of information sharing and supplying systems for supercomputing, computa- 
tional modeling/analysis, e-learning, genomics, bio-informatics, and other research opportuni- 
ties. For additional information please visit the website: http : //dor.ncat .edu/under/f acts/people/ 
marlo w/index .htm . 

The Directorate of Special Projects and Programs (SPP) coordinates the planning efforts 
of special projects to improve IT efficiency and effectiveness in various administrative opera- 
tions. SPP provides project management services in collaboration with all functional areas of 
the Division of Information Technology & Telecommunications and end-users for special 
projects. SPP also provides ad-hoc reporting for the University's Financial Records System 
(FRS). 

The focus of the Directorate of Student Technology Services (STS) is to enhance infor- 
mation technology support for the University and surrounding community through the em- 
ployment and professional development of North Carolina A&T students. STS will also provide 
IT Procurement. IT procurement consists of assisting the University community with informa- 
tion technology acquisitions while further developing standards, processes, and vendor rela- 
tionships in this area. 

52 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 






i The Directorate of Systems and Networking (SN) is responsible for the day-to-day man- 
i agement of the academic and administrative computing systems that support the University's 
i mission critical applications. This includes ensuring that the equipment and the supporting 
i network infrastructure are fully functional and readily available. 

The Directorate of Teaching and Learning Systems (TLS) is charged with professional 
i development and training activities of the University with regard to technology proficiency. In 
j addition, this directorate is responsible for project management associated with the university's 
! e-learning platform. Blackboard. 

The Directorate of Telecommunications and Client Services (TCS) covers two areas. 
The Telecommunications Services department is responsible for providing effective voice com- 
munication service for the university faculty, staff, and student populations. It includes the 
I installation/administration/maintenance of services such as voice mail, cellular, calling card, 
! pagers and pay phones. Client Services is responsible for providing helpdesk services in infor- 
i mation delivery, problem management, and technical troubleshooting for recommended com- 
puters and software packages for campus personal computer users. Client Services also 
| determines the standards for computer hardware, software, and related equipment to ensure 
that such equipment is appropriate for the University's computing environment. For additional 
1 information please visit the website: http://www.ncat.edu/~cit/csv . 

The Directorate of Web Support Services (WSS) addresses website development and com- 
munication needs of faculty, staff and students at North Carolina A&T State University by 
using website development and management tools to provide web-based applications. WSS 
also uses these tools to share information about the many activities and facets of the University 
i with the online community. WSS also provides opportunities for continued education and skill 
I development for the University community through skills development workshops. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 53 



FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION 

This section identifies and gives pertinent information about all the fields of study that 
participate in graduate education at North Carolina A&T State University. There are a total of 
40 different fields offering graduate degrees. In addition, there are nine fields that offer minors 
at the graduate level and eleven areas that support graduate education through offering gradu- 
ate level courses or in some other capacity. Fields of instruction that offer graduate degrees are 
listed first. Information given for each field includes the faculty, requirements for admission to 
and completion of the degree program(s), student financial support, courses offered, and other 
relevant information. Following the degree offering fields is a listing of other fields of instruc- 
tion which offer graduate minors or graduate courses, or support graduate education in some 
other way. To avoid duplication, basic Graduate School requirements for admission and comple- 
tion of graduate degree programs are not duplicated for each field of instruction. Only those' 
requirements that are unique to the field are given in the sections on the individual fields. The 
Graduate School offers major programs of study in the following fields. 

DEGREES GRANTED 

The School of Graduate Studies at North Carolina A&T State University offers the follow- 
ing degrees: 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (Ph.D.) 

1 . Electrical Engineering 

2. Energy and Environmental Studies (Interdisciplinary) 

3. Industrial Engineering 

4. Leadership Studies (Interdisciplinary) 

5. Mechanical Engineering 

6. Industrial Management (Consortium Degree Program w/ University of Indiana) 

MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.) 
College of Arts and Sciences 

1 . English and African American Literature 

MASTER OF ART IN EDUCATION (M.A.Ed.) (Effective Spring 2006) 
School of Education 

1 . Reading Education 

MASTER OF ART IN TEACHING (M.A.T.) (Effective Spring 2006) 
School of Education 

1 . Art Education 

2. Biology Education 

3. Business Education (7-12) 

4. Comprehensive Science 

5. Elementary Education (K-6) 

6. English Education 

7. Family and Consumer Sciences Education (Birth-Kindergarten) 

8. Family and Consumer Sciences Education (Child Development) 

9. History Education 

10. Human Performance and Leisure Studies (K-12) Formerly Health and Physical Ed 



54 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



11. Mathematics Education 

12. Music Education 

13. Special Education (K-12) 

14. Technology Education (9-12) 

15. Trade and Industrial Education (9-12) 

MASTER IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION (M.S.A.) 
' School of Education 

1 . School Administration 

MASTER OF SCIENCE (M.S.) 
•School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences 

i 1 . Agribusiness, Applied Economics and Agriscience Education 

a. Agricultural Economics 

b. Agricultural Education 

2. Animal Health Science 

3. Food and Nutritional Science 

i 

4. Plant and Soil Science 

College of Arts and Sciences 

1. Biology 

2. Biology, Secondary Education 

3. Chemistry 

4. Chemistry, Secondary Education 

5. English, Secondary Education 

6. History, Secondary Education 

7. Mathematics, Applied 

8. Mathematics, Secondary Education 

9. Physics 

School of Education 

1 . Adult Education 

2. Counselor Education 

3. Elementary Education 

4. Physical Education 

5. Human Resources (Agency Counseling) 

6. Human Resources (Rehabilitation Counseling) 

7. Instructional Technology 

I College of Engineering 

1 . Civil and Environmental Engineering 

2. Chemical Engineering 

3. Computer Science 

4. Electrical and Computer Engineering 

5. Industrial and Systems Engineering 

6. Mechanical Engineering 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 55 



School of Technology 

1 . Construction Management and Occupational Safety and Health 

a. Construction Management 

b. Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health 

c. Occupational Safety and Health 

2. Electronics and Computer Technology 

a. Electronics and Computer Technology (MSIT) 

b. Information Technology (MSIT) 

3. Graphic Communication Systems and Technological Studies 

a. Graphic Communication Systems (MSIT) 

b. Technology Education, Teaching 

c. Trade and Industrial Education, Teaching 

d. Training and Development for Industry 

e. Workforce Development Director 

4. Manufacturing Systems 

a. Manufacturing Systems (MSIT) 

Interdisciplinary Studies (Graduate Studies) 

Computational Science Engineering 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MANAGEMENT (M.S.M.) 
School of Business and Economics 

1 . Human Resources Management 

2. Management Information Systems 

3. Transportation and Business Logistics 



56 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Agribusiness, Applied Economics 
and Agriscience Education 



Anthony K. Yeboah, Chairperson 

(336)334-7943 

yeboaha@ncat.edu 

OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Agribusiness, Applied Economics, and Agriscience Education offers 
programs of study leading to the Master of Science degrees in Agricultural Economics and 
Agricultural Education. The program in Agricultural Economics prepares students for careers 
rin teaching, research, extension, agriculture-related business, and government service. The pro- 
gram in Agricultural Education emphasizes the professional improvement of teachers and pro- 
fessional workers in related areas with education responsibilities while concurrently preparing 
students for employment in administration, supervision, extension, teacher education, busi- 
ness, and research in agricultural education and related fields. Both programs also prepare 
students for further graduate studies to achieve a terminal degree. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Master of Science - Agricultural Education 

Concentrations: Professional Licensure, Professional Service 

Master of Science - Agricultural Economics 

Concentrations: Agricultural Marketing and International Trade; and Rural Development Policy 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The general requirements for admission are an undergraduate degree from an accredited 
institution, with a minimum grade point average of 2.65 (on a 4.0 scale) and a basic preparation 
in Agricultural Education, Education, General Agriscience, Agricultural Economics, Econom- 
ics, Agribusiness or Business Administration, with a preparation in Economics/Statistics, gen- 
erally will provide an acceptable preparation. Applicants who do not meet the requirements 
will be considered on an individual basis. Applicants are encouraged to provide GRE scores; 
however, these scores are not required for admission or graduation. A GPA of 3.0 is required 
for graduation. 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

Agricultural Economics: 

The Master of Science in Agricultural Economics requires that the students complete one 

of two options: 

I THESIS OPTION - 30 Hours: 

This option requires a minimum of 30 semester hours, including 12 semester hours of 
"core" courses in advanced economic theory, a course in statistics and research methods, 
9 semester hours of courses in the selected program track/concentrations, 1 elective 
3-hour course, and 6 semester hours of thesis culminating in scholarly research work. 
In addition, the successful completion and defense of the thesis and a comprehensive 
examination are required. 

2. NON-THESIS OPTION - 30 Hours: 

I This option consists of a minimum of 30 semester hours, including 15 semester hours 

of "core" courses in advanced economic theory, a course in statistics, econometrics and 
research methods, 9 semester hours of courses in the selected program track, 1 elective 

Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 57 



3-hour course, and 3 semester hours of a scientific project. This non-thesis option recog-l 
nizes the changes within the agricultural economics discipline relative to the manner in 
which research is conducted and reported such that it becomes more applied, action- 1 
oriented and evaluative. The student may choose to complete an econometrics project or I 
an issues based project. In addition, the successful completion and defense of the project I 
paper and a comprehensive examination are required. 

The student pursuing the Master of Science degree in Agricultural Economics/; 
Agribusiness is required to complete a common core of courses consisting of: 



AGEC 705 
AGEC710 
AGEC 720 
AGEC 725 

or 
AGED 703 



Advanced Statistics 
Advanced Microeconomics 
Advanced Macroeconomics 
Research Methods 

Scientific Methods of Research 



3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours ; 

3 Semester Hours ' 



In addition, areas of concentration as specified require the following courses: 



Rural Development Policy 

Core Courses 

Program Track/Concentration Courses 



AGEC 708 


Econometrics 


AGEC 732 


Agricultural Policy 


AGEC 740 


Production Economics 


AGEC 760 


Social Organization of Agriculture and 




Rural Development 


Elective 




Thesis 





Total hours in concentration 



12 Semester Hours 
9 Semester Hours 

3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 

3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours I 
6 Semester Hours 

30 Semester Hours J 



Agricultural Marketing and International Trade 

Core Courses 

Program Track/Concentration Courses 

International Agricultural Trade Policy 
International Agribusiness Marketing 
Agricultural Marketing 
Economic Development 
Marketing Problems and Issues 
Theory of International Trade 
Agricultural Price Analysis 



AGEC 632 
AGEC 634 
AGEC 734 
AGEC 735 
AGEC 736 
AGEC 738 
AGEC 756 
Elective 
Thesis 



Total hours in concentration 
Notes 



12 Semester Hours 
9 Semester Hours 

3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
3 Semester Hours 
6 Semester Hours 1 

30 Semester Hours 



1. Students who select the non-thesis option must take three hours of AGEC 708 
(Econometrics) and three hours of AGED 750 (Community Problems). 

2. The student, in consultation with his or her advisor, will select three courses 
from the program track of interest. 



58 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Agricultural Education: 

L Students seeking admission into agricultural education have a choice of two major study 
concentrations: Professional Licensure and Professional Service. The Professional Licensure 
L rack is designed for individuals who are currently teaching secondary agricultural education, 
polders of the "A" License for secondary agricultural education in the State of North Carolina, 
)r those individuals who are within 12 hours of the "A" License. Students enrolled in the 
\ Professional Licensure Concentration are immersed in a curriculum based upon advanced com- 
jetencies as mandated by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction and National 
? 3oard for Professional Teaching Standards. Students enrolled in the Professional Licensure 
concentration have the option to pursue a thesis or non-thesis track. Upon completion of this 
concentration students are eligible for the "M" License in secondary agricultural education for 
idle State of North Carolina. 

Students choosing the Professional Service concentration have the opportunity to develop 
$ plan of study, which will prepare them for careers in the broad areas of extension education, 
public relations, social capital development, curriculum design, adult education, program de- 
velopment and evaluation, agribusiness, as well as positions in agriscience research. The Pro- 
essional Service Concentration consists of a thesis and non-thesis option. 

Upon admittance into the graduate program in Agricultural Education the student is as- 
signed an advisor who will guide him/her in the development of his/her graduate committee, 
)lan of study, Product of Learning, and Educational Inquiry Project/Thesis. Completion of 37 
semester hours of approved graduate level courses is required for both study concentrations. A 
well-balanced, unified, and complete program study will be required. In addition, those students 
who do not write a thesis must develop an educational inquiry project under the supervision of 
'heir graduate committee. The advisory committee will determine its nature and content. For 
pilose students who select the thesis option, they must complete 31 hours of approved graduate 
;evel courses and 6 hours of thesis credit. In both options students must successfully pass a 
written comprehensive examination in Agricultural Education to complete the degree program. 
The student pursuing the Master of Science of Agricultural Education is required to com- 
plete a common core of courses consisting of: 



^ourse 

AGEC 705 

\ or 
,CUIN710 
AGEC 725 
I or 
AGED 703 



Title 

Advanced Statistics 

Educational Statistics 
Research Methods 

Scientific Methods in Research 



Credit 

3 

3 
3 



CURSES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 



course 

AGED 600 
\GED601 
AGED 607 
\GED 608 
\GED 609 
\GED611 
\GED 612 
\GED 700 
\GED 701 
\GED 703 
\GED 704 



Title 

Youth Organization and Program Management 

Adult Education in Vocational and Extension Education 

Environmental Education 

Agricultural Extension Organization and Methods 

Community Analysis and Rural Life 

Special Problems in Agricultural Education 

Field Studies in Agricultural Education 

Seminar in Agricultural Education and Extension 

Professional Service Seminar 

Scientific Methods in Research 

History and Philosophy of Vocational Education 



Credit 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 
1-6 
1-6 

1 

1 

3 

3 



Jncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



59 



AGED 705 Advances in Agricultural Business and Science 

AGED 708 Scientific Methods in Educational Research II 

AGED 709 Study and Application of Technological Advances 

and Best Practices to Agriculture 

AGED 710 Program Design, Management, and Evaluation 

AGED 711 Advance Teaching and Assessment Methods 

AGED 712 Government Policy Analysis and Agriculture 

and Problem Solving Techniques for Field Settings 

AGED 750 Community Problems 

AGED 75 1 Agricultural Education Across the Curriculum 

AGED 752 Special Populations in Agricultural Education 

AGED 753 Program Planning 

AGED 754 History of Agricultural Education 

AGED 795 Agricultural Industry Internship 

AGED 796 Master's Non-thesis Project Seminar 

AGED 797 Agricultural Education Program Management 

Plan Project 

AGED 798 Seminar in Agricultural Education 

AGRI 799 Thesis Research 

AGRI 999 Continuation of Thesis 



COURSES IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT 

Course Title Credit 

AGEC 632 International Agricultural Trade Policy 3 

AGEC 634 International Agribusiness Marketing 3 

AGEC 635 Economic Geography of World Food and Resources 3 

AGEC 638 Special Problems in Agricultural Economics 3 

AGEC 640 Agribusiness Management 3 

AGEC 641 Special Problems in Agribusiness Management 3 

AGEC 644 Statistical Methods in Agricultural Economics I 3 

AGEC 646 Statistical Methods in Agricultural Economics II 3 

AGEC 648 Appraisal and Finance of Agribusiness Firms 3 

AGEC 650 Human Resource Development 3 

AGEC 675 Computer Applications in Agriculture 3 

AGEC 705 Statistical Methods in Agricultural Economics 3 

AGEC 708 Econometrics 3 

AGEC 710 Microeconomics 3 

AGEC 720 Macroeconomics 3 

AGEC 725 Research Methods in Agricultural Economics 3 

AGEC 732 Agricultural Policy 3 

AGEC 734 Agricultural Marketing and Interregional Trade 3 

AGEC 735 Economic Development 3 

AGEC 736 Agricultural Marketing Problems and Issues 3 

AGEC 738 Theory of International Trade 3 

AGEC 740 Production Economics 3 

AGEC 756 Agricultural Price Analysis 3 

AGEC 760 Social Organzation of Agriculture and Rural Development 3 

AGRI 799 Thesis Research 6 (6-0) 

AGRI 999 Continuation of Thesis 1 



60 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



COURSES WITH DESCRIPTION IN AGRIBUSINESS, 
APPLIED ECONOMICS AND AGRISCIENCE EDUCATION 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

Agricultural Economics 

AGEC-632. International Agricultural Trade Policy Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course includes a review of economic and welfare theory applications relative to trade of 
agricultural commodities. Topical issues include the analysis of linkages among commodity 
programs, fiscal and trade policies for the U.S. and other countries in an interdependent world, 
development of an understanding of international institutions and their role in formulating 
ialiments of strategic agricultural trade policy. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

AGEC-634. International Agribusiness Marketing Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will examine and analyze the series of problems, issues, policies, regulations and 
procedures relevant to the global marketing of agricultural and related commodities by 
agribusiness firms. Emphasis will be on combining firm-level agribusiness marketing concepts 
with international agribusiness marketing and export management practices, including the de- 
velopment of international agribusiness marketing plans and case studies from international 
agribusiness firms. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

iAGEC-635. Economic Geography of World Food and Resources Credit 3 (3-0) 

i The objective of this course is to acquaint students from across the University and hopefully 
those outside the University with the economics and geography of the world's human and 
natural resources as they affect food and fiber production, resource use, and economic welfare 
around the world. Content is drawn from many disciplines that study the natural world and 
investigate forces that affect the availability of resources, the dynamics of populations, the 
behavior of people, and different nation's policies towards food, resource use, trade, and the 
environment. Initially, the course provides students with a basic tool kit of essential econom- 
ics, geography, climatology, and history. Then these tools are used to compare and contrast 
different examples around the world. Finally, some critical resource use and environmental 
issues are introduced and applied to the examples. The overall theme of the course is on the 
hard decisions and trade-off necessary to meet growing needs with fixed resources in a stressed 
natural environment. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

*AGEC-640. Agribusiness Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on methods of research, plans, organization, and the application of man- 
agement principles. Part of the student's time will be spent in consultation with agribusiness 
ifirms. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

*AGEC-641. Special Problems in Agribusiness Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course relies heavily on case studies and simulation models to help make decisions and 
solve problems faced by agribusiness managers. Also, students will be exposed to quantitative 
techniques for analyzing and solving problems confronting the firm. Emphasis is placed on 
applying theoretical concepts to the real-world decision-making environment. Prerequisite: 
Ag. Econ 640 or consent of instructor. 

AGEC-648. Appraisal and Finance of Agribusiness Firms Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course evaluates principles of land valuation, appraisal and taxation. Special areas include 
the role of credit in a money economy, classification of credit, principles underlying the eco- 
nomic use of credit and the role of the government in the field of credit. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 6 1 



AGEC-650. Human Resource Development Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on the analysis of human resources in relation to changing agricultural 
production technology in rural areas. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

AGEC-675. Computer Applications in Agricultural Economics Credit 3 (3-0) j 

This course is designed to provide students with the tools to utilize computers for agricultural 
decision-making. Emphasis will be placed on utilizing existing software packages for micro- 1 
computers and mainframe computers to make financial, economic and quantitative analysis of 
farm and agribusiness-related problems. Prerequisite(s): Ag. Econ. 330 or Econ. 330. 

Agricultural Education 

AGED-600. Youth Organization and Program Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

Principles, theories and practices involved in organizing, conducting, supervising, and manag- 
ing youth organizations and programs. Emphasis will be on the analysis of youth organization 
and programs in vocational and extension education. 

AGED-601. Adult Education in Vocational and Extension Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

A study of the principles and problems of organizing and conducting programs for adults. 
Emphasis is given to the principles of conducting organized instruction in agricultural educa- 
tion, extension, and related industries. 

AGED-607. Environmental Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

Principles and practices of understanding the environment and the interrelated complexities of 
the environment. The course will include a study of agricultural occupations related to the 
environment and materials that need to be developed for use by high school teachers of agricul- 
ture and other professional workers. 

AGED-608. Agricultural Extension Organization and Methods Credit 3 (3-0) 

Principles, objectives, organization, program development, and methods in cooperative extension. 

AGED-609. Community Analysis and Rural Life Credit 3 (3-0) 

Educational processes, structure and function of rural society, and the role that diverse organi- 
zations, agencies, and institutions play in the education and adjustment of rural people to the 
demands of modern society. 

AGED-611. Special Problems in Agricultural Education and Extension Credit 1-6 (1-6) 

Special work in problems dealing with Agricultural Education and Extension will be exam- : 
ined. Students should be at the graduate level or be working on their lateral or provisional 
license in agricultural education. 

AGED-612. Field Studies in Agricultural Education Credit 1-6 (1-6) 

Field Studies involved in Agricultural and Extension Education. 

Graduate Students Only 
A gricultural Economics 

AGEC-705. Statistical Methods in Agricultural Economics Credit 3 (3-0) 

Advanced topics on analysis of variance, regression, correlation, multistage sampling and prob- 
ability are covered in depth. Prerequisite: Ag. Econ. 646. I 

AGEC-708. Econometrics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on the application of econometric techniques to agricultural economic prob- 
lems, theory and estimation of structural economic parameters. Prerequisite: Ag. Econ. 705. 



62 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



GEC-710. Microeconomics Credit 3 (3-0) 

Irice theory and the theory of the firm are covered comprehensively. The decision-making 
nits in our economy and their market relationship are also examined. 

lGEC-720. Macroeconomics Credit 3 (3-0) 

li continuation of aggregate economics, with emphasis upon measurement, growth and fluc- 
lation of national income is the focus of this course. 

.GEC-725. Research Methods in Agricultural Economics Credit 3 (3-0) 

he philosophical bases for research methods used in agricultural economics are discussed. 
Jternative research methods are compared with respect to their dependence on the concepts of 
2onomic theory, mathematics and statistics. Alternative approaches to planning research projects 
re evaluated. 

i.GEC-732. Agricultural Policy Credit 3 (3-0) 

advanced analysis of the role of agriculture in the general economy and of economic, political 
nd social forces which affect development of agricultural policy is the substantive focus of 
lis course. 

\GEC-734. Agricultural Marketing and Interregional Trade Credit 3 (3-0) 

his course is designed to apply basic economic theory to interpret the essential components of 
le domestic and international marketing process for agricultural products. The primary focus 
/ill be on the spatial, temporal and form dimensional of market price analysis with significant 
mphasis on regional interrelationship and specialization, current trade issues and the rational 
or trade. Specifically, students enrolled in this course will receive intensive instruction in the 
omplex organization and function of the world's food marketing system. 

GEC-735. Economic Development Credit 3 (3-0) 

his course is designed to analyze factors and issues involved in the process of economic 
rowth and development, with emphasis on developing countries. The theories, problems, ob- 
jectives and strategies of development, including major policy issues, resources, and constraints 
f alternative strategies are discussed. The role of capital, technology, agriculture and interna- 
; onal trade in the development process are examined. 

iGEC-736. Agricultural Marketing Problems and Issues Credit 3 (3-0) 

|ihis course is designed to examine current complex problems in agricultural marketing and 
.lethods of developing solutions. 

VGEC-738. Theory of International Trade Credit 3 (3-0) 

he principal aim of this course is to familiarize the student with the fundamental mechanisms 
ind theory (pure and monetary) of international trade. Selected topics will include the law of 
omparative advantage, gains from trade, factor endowments and growth theories, commercial 
olicy, foreign exchange and the balance of payments, and the monetary and portfolio balance 
lechanisms. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

uGEC-740. Production Economics Credit 3 (3-0) 

ihis course focuses specifically on production economics theory in a quantitative framework, 
echnical and economic factor-product, factor-factor, and product-product relationships in single 
nd multi-product firms under conditions of perfect and imperfect competition in both factor 
nd product markets are topical areas. 



ncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 63 



AGEC-756. Agricultural Price Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

The use of price information in the decision-making process is the essence of this course. The 
relation of supply and demand in determining agricultural prices and the relation of prices to 
grade, time, location, and stages of processing in the marketing system are considered. The 
course also includes advanced methods of price analysis, the concept of parity and the role of- 
price support programs in agricultural decisions. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

AGEC-760. Social Organzation of Agriculture and Rural Development Credit 3 (3-0) 

The student will be introduced to socioeconomic concepts and theory as they apply to issues 
relating to agriculture and rural development. Moreover, the student can expect to learn about 1 
the different types of farm organizations; governmental agricultural agencies, farm movements, 
models of community organizations, and the changing structure of agriculture. The student' 
will have a better insight about why some rural areas are growing and others are declining; how 
rural and urban areas are interdependent; how growth affects the distribution of income be- 
tween income classes in these areas. Finally the student will gain an appreciation of how the 
different intellectual socioeconomic traditions explain the development of rural and urban econo- 
mies and how to apply socioeconomic analysis in the discussion of federal, state and local ] 
policy for rural areas. 

AGRI-799. Thesis Credit 6 (6-0) 

A gricultural Education 

AGED-700. Seminar in Agricultural Education Credit 1 (1-0), 

A review of current problems and practices in the field of agricultural education and extension J 

AGED 701. Professional Service Seminar Credit 1 (1-0) 

This course will prepare students for the entire Master's Program. Students will establish goals ( 
and objectives for their Master's Program. Students will also be introduced to the Professional 
Portfolio that is required of all Master's Students on the completion of their program. 

AGED-703. Scientific Methods in Research Credit 3 (3-0)' 

Methods of procedures in investigation and experimentation in education, accompanied by 1 
critical examination of studies made in agricultural education and related fields. A research 
problem is developed under the supervision of the staff. 

AGED-704. Foundation and Philosophy of Agricultural Education Credit 3 (3-0) 1 

This advanced course deals with the development, organization, and philosophical foundations 
of agricultural education from colonial times to the present. Emphasis is placed on the role of 
societal and scientific changes, the federal government, and philosophy and its role in life 
including the rise of education in America, legislation having an impact on agricultural educa- 
tion, education in agriculture, and current issues in agricultural education on the evolution of 
agricultural education. Students will be expected to develop and defend their philosophy of 
agricultural education based on the foundations and philosophy of Agricultural Education. In 
additional to the above, students will be expected to research educational topics, critique the 
current research and present a seminar on their research topic. 

AGED-705. Advances in Agricultural Business and Science Credit 3 (3-0) 

Students will review and study the literature on innovations in agribusiness/science practices 
processes and product technologies. They will become knowledgeable and articulate about 



64 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



{issues related to the role and contribution of science and research to agriculture over time, the 
development and diffusion of best practices, the impact of specific technological breakthroughs 
and basic techniques for assessing the efficacy of these. 

*AGED-708. Scientific Methods in Educational Research II Credit 3 (3-0) 

'This course covers advanced techniques in qualitative and quantitative research methodology 
focusing on the formulation of substantive research questions, problems or issues. Students will 
([earn to apply a variety of educational research procedures such as ethnographic methodologies, 
evaluation research and case studies, qualitative choice models, nonparametric and parametric 
statistical methods and quasi-experimental techniques for field research and general linear mod- 
els. Students will conduct, under the direction of the instructor, a research educational based 
[project on their present agricultural educational experiences. Prerequisite: AGED 703. 

AGED-709. Study and Application of Technological Advances 

and Best Practices to Agriculture Credit 3 (3-0) 

'This course provides students with an opportunity to observe and study the application of 
technological advances and best practices in a variety of settings in agriculture. In addition, 
Students will work to develop a repertoire of skills and techniques that will enable them to 
select and apply innovations to their o*wn educational settings, particularly the infusion of tech- 
nology into the curriculum. The program will draw on the expertise of industry specialists and 
researchers, field trips and labs will provide hands-on experience. Prerequisite: AGED 705. 

AGED-710. Program Design, Management, and Evaluation Credit 3 (3-0) 

The planning, management and development of agricultural educational programs including 
needs assessment, objectives, development and content and materials selection. Evaluation of 
instructional programs; formative for program improvement and summative for outcomes ac- 
countability. Prerequisite: AGED 700. 

AGED-711. Advance Teaching and Assessment Methods Credit 3 (3-0) 

f This course focuses on advanced concepts and methods relevant for both formal and informal 
agricultural education presentations, effects that methods may have on individuals involved in 
/the learning experience and demonstrations of proficiency in use of various advanced method- 
ologies, technologies and concepts. Students will focus on human learning development, diversity 
jissues, motivational strategies to plan, use and evaluate student learning. Students will re- 
search and present projects based on the course of study. Students will keep a reflective journal 
based on the infusion of learning methods used in their educational occupations. Prerequisites: 
(AGED 700 (701 for Professional Service Majors), 704, 709, 710. 
i 
AGED-712. Government Policy Analysis and Agriculture and 

; Problem Solving Techniques for Field Settings Credit 3 (3-0) 

j Students will become conversant with basic principles, procedures, and phases of public policy 
( formulation, analysis and decision making. Students will use agricultural issues/problem and 
( policy as case studies to trace the evolution of an issue/problem/felt need into legislation or 
jpolicy. Students will also learn basic techniques for analyzing policy impacts. Prerequisite: 
, AGED 703. 

AGED-750. Community Problems Credit 3 (3-0) 

(A study of the common problems of the community that relate to agriculture and related areas 
; and of solutions for these problems. 

'AGED-751. Agricultural Education across the Curriculum Credit 3 (3-0) 

This advance course will center on the application of curriculum development models, theories 
and processes in agricultural education. A large portion of the class will be devoted to the 

J Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 65 



integration of agricultural curriculum into other subject areas such as Math, Science, English 
and History and the integration of other subject matter areas into agricultural education. Stu- 
dent will evaluate curriculum products and learn to modify curriculum to meet the needs of all 
students as well as reinforce other curricular areas. Students will see how content matter can be 
reinforced as it is taught across all curricular areas. Students will be expected to present a 
project based on developing curricular plans and materials that address curriculum integration 
as related to agricultural education. Prerequisite(s): AGED 700 (701 for Professional Service 
Majors), 703, 704, 710. 

AGED-752. Special Populations in Agricultural Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

This advance course will focus on the diverse needs of students for learning to take place. 
Special emphasis will be placed on the instruction of agricultural education to populations of 
students within economic, gender, ethnic, cultural, political, physical differences. Students will 
discover and use educational theory to examine strategies and plans to overcome problems in 
their educational occupations. Students will research both legal requirements and expectations 
that effect what can be done with increase student learning. Students will be required to de- 
velop and present a diversity management plan for their program. Prerequisite(s): AGED 700, 
703,704,753. 

AGED-753. Teaching and Assessment for Agricultural Professionals Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on concepts and methods relevant for both formal and informal education 
presentations, effects that methods may have on individuals involved in the learning experi- 
ence and demonstrations of proficiency in use of various educational methodologies, technologies 
and concepts. Students will focus on human learning development, diversity issues, motiva- 
tional strategies to plan, use and evaluate student learning. Students will research and present 
projects based on the course of study. Students will keep a reflective journal based on the 
infusion of learning methods used in their educational occupations. Prerequisite(s): AGED 
701,704,709,710. 

AGED-754. History of Agricultural Education and Extension Credit 3 (3-0) 

Historical development, social and philosophical foundations, and current status in relation to 
the total vocational education program. Special attention is given to agricultural education and 
extension as it developed in the United States. 

AGED-796. Master's Non-thesis Project Seminar Credit 1 (1-0) 

This seminar will focus on the needs of bringing agricultural education programs up to date 
with public requirements and the success of all students. Students will be required to do outside 
reading in current educational trends in agricultural education and critique them. Students will 
present two seminars in this course. One will focus on an issue in agricultural education and the 
second will be based on the student's Agricultural Education Program Management Plan. Pre- 
requisite: AGED 797. 

AGED-797. Agricultural Education Program Management Plan Project Credit 4 (4-0) 
Students in the Non-thesis option will be required to put a management plan together for their 
educational occupational program. The plan will include research on the needs and expecta- 
tions of the educational program and the evidence that either shows compliance or plans to 
meet the programs needs. Students will work with their committee to establish the requirement 
of the plan and evidence which will be required to meet the plans expectations. Students will 
present their plan in AGED 796. Prerequisite(s): AGED 700, 703 and 710. 



66 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future' 



c \GED-798. Seminar in Agricultural Education Credit 1 (1-0) 

.Phis course is designed for students who are in their last semester of their Master's program. 
[The course focuses on the needs and expectations of being a Master Teacher and a leader in 
agricultural education. Students will be expected to present their Master Teacher portfolio at 
r he end of the course. Students will also present seminars based on topics related to the overall 
( hemes, competencies, standards of the Agricultural Education Master's Program. Prerequi- 
site: Last semester of the Master's Program. 



VGRI-799. MS Thesis Research Credit 6 (6-0) 

(Vlaster of Science thesis research under the supervision of the thesis committee chairperson, 
eading to the completion of the Master's thesis. This course is only available to thesis option 
jctudents. 

I 



I 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 67 



Animal Sciences 



Ralph Nobles, Chairperson 

101 B.C. Webb Hall 

(336) 334-7547 

The Department of Animal Sciences offers a graduate program in Animal Health Science i 
that emphasizes the effects of environmental factors upon animal growth and development, re- 
production, and disease resistance. Courses are designed to provide a solid foundation of funda- 
mental biological and biochemical principles within the disciplines of breeding and genetics, 
biotechnology, food safety, microbiology, nutrition, pathology, physiology, and toxicology. 

OBJECTIVES 

To advance scholarship in Animal Sciences and related disciplines; to prepare and in- 
crease the number of professionals with graduate training for employment in animal sciences, 
animal agriculture, biomedical, biotechnology and related industries, and to prepare students 
to enter Ph.D. degree programs. 

DEGREE OFFERED 

Master of Science - Animal Health Science 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The general requirements for admission to the program are an undergraduate degree from 
an accredited four year college or university with a minimum grade point average of 2.6 (on a 
4.0 scale), and a basic preparation in animal and or laboratory animal sciences, biological, 
physical or agricultural sciences, or related areas. Applicants who do not meet the requirements 
will be considered on an individual basis. Applicants are encouraged to provide GRE scores,! 
although these scores are not required for admission or graduation. A minimum of 30 credit, 
hours and a GPA of 3.0 is required for graduation. 

PROGRAM ORGANIZATION 

Core Courses. Core courses provide the student with an understanding of the relationships 
between the animal and its environment, within specific biological disciplines. Core courses 
constitute 13 credit hours. Each student in the program is required to take the core courses. 

Credit 
Course Title (Lec.-Lab.) 

ANSC 701 Environmental Topics in Animal Health 3 (3-0) 

ANSC 702 Seminar in Animal Health 1 (1-0) 

AGRI 799 MS Thesis Research 6 (6-0) 

AGRI 604 Research Design and Analysis 3 (2-2) 

Elective Courses: 

ANSC 604 Administrative and Regulatory Policies Governing Animal Use 2 (2-0) 

ANSC 6 1 1 Principles of Animal Nutrition 3 (3-0) 

ANSC 614 Animal Breeding 3 (3-0) 

ANSC 624 Physiology of Reproduction 3 (3-0) 

ANSC 637 Environmental Toxicology 3 (2-3) 

ANSC 641 Disease Management of Livestock and Poultry 3 (3-0) 



68 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



I ;NSC 665 Techniques in Biotechnology 3(2-2) 

f!|jSC 712 Nutrition and Disease. 3 (3-0) 

WSC713 Global Livestock Systems 3(2-2) 

VNSC 723 Animal Physiology 3 (3-0) 

INSC 708 Special Problems in Animal Health 2 (2-0) 

\NSC 782 Cellular Pathobiology 3 (3-0) 

3\NSC 771 Bioinformatics and Genome Analysis 3 (3-0) 

; ASC 653 Laboratory Animal Management and Clinical Techniques 4 (2-6) 

I ASC 660 Special Techniques in Specimen Preparation, 

! Immunological Techniques, Electron Microscopy 

Radioisotopes, Radiology or Histotechnology 3(1-6) 

TOL671 Principles of Immunology 3(3-0) 

:HEM651 General Biochemistry 3(3-0) 

COURSES WITH DESCRIPTION IN ANIMAL SCIENCES 

For Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Students 

lNSC-604. Administrative and Regulatory Policies Governing 

Animal Use Credit 2 (2-0) 

Regulations that impact the use of animals for research, education and testing. Federal, state 
nd local regulations and policies. Regulations, facilities, and practices involving the use of 
azardous agents (biological, chemical, and physical) which affect the safety of humans and 
inimals. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

)iNSC-611. Principles of Animal Nutrition Credit 3 (3-0) 

'fundamentals of modern animal nutrition. Nutrient metabolism and role in productive func- 
ions. Prerequisite: ANSC 212 or permission of instructor. 

\NSC-613. Livestock and Meat Evaluation Credit 2 (1-2) 

Selection and evaluation of desirable animals in both market and breeding classes. Identification 

Ind evaluation of wholesale and retail cuts of meat. Prerequisites: ANSC 312 and ANSC 413. 

I 

VNSC-614. Animal Breeding Credit 3 (3-0) 

application of genetic and breeding principles to livestock production and improvement. Phe- 
'.otypic and genotypic effects of selection methods; mating systems. Prerequisites: ANSC 211 
md ANSC 214. 

iNSC-615. Selection of Meat and Meat Products Credit 3 (2-2) 

identification, grading and cutting of meats. Prerequisites: ANSC 421 or ANSC 416. 

1NSC-619. Special Problems in Livestock Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

in depth study of problems in feeding, breeding, and management in the production of beef 
lattle, sheep and swine. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

kNSC-624. Physiology of Reproduction in Vertebrate Species Credit 3 (3-0) 

Idechanisms of reproductive processes with special emphasis on their interaction with the dis- 
ciplines of nutrition, immunology and biochemistry. Prerequisites: LASC 461 or ANSC 723 or 
lermission of instructor. 

>NSC-637. Environmental Toxicology Credit 3 (2-3) 

iources, distribution, and toxicity of chemicals which are hazardous to the environments of 
nan and animals. Prerequisite: LASC 636 or permission of instructor. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 69 



ANSC-641. Disease Management of Livestock and Poultry Credit 3 (3-0)i 

Prevention and control of diseases in livestock species and poultry; Micro- and 
macroenvironments that result in disease. Prerequisites: ANSC 45 1 or permission of instructor., 

ANSC-657. Poultry Anatomy and Physiology Credit 3 (2-M 

Structure and function of tissues, organs, and systems of the domestic fowl. Prerequisite: ANSC 
451. 

ANSC-659. Special Problems in Poultry Credit 3 (3-0) 

Assignment of work in a student's area of interest; project method in Poultry Science. Prereq 
uisite: Three advanced courses in Poultry Science. 



ANSC-665. Techniques in Biotechnology Credit 3 (2-2) 

Basic principles and laboratory experiences in biotechnology. Concepts of DNA structure, func- : 
tion, related applications in biotechnology. Isolating DNA and RNA; genomic DNA and plasmid 
DNA analysis, gel electrophoresis, Southern hybridizations, gene probes. Prerequisites: ANSC 1 
214, CHEM 25 1 , BIOL 466 or permission of instructor. 

LASC-653. Laboratory Animal Management and Clinical Techniques Credit 4 (2-6) 
Principles, theories and current concepts of Laboratory Animal Science. Government regula- 
tions, ethical consideration, animal facility management and animal health surveillance 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

LASC-660. Special Techniques in Specimen Preparation, Immunological 
Techniques, Electron Microscopy, Radioisotopes, Radiology or 
Histotechnology Credit 3 (1-^ 

Special expertise in either preparation of animal models for classroom, museum and special, 
display, the theoretical and practical aspects of immunological techniques, electron and light- 
microscopy, radiology, tissue culture or histochemistry. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor., 

BIOL-671. Principles of Immunology Credit 3 (3-0), 

A study of mammalian immune responses; particularly in humans. Special emphasis will 
beplaced on the physiology, genetics, and regulation of immune responses. 
Interrelationshipsbetween nonspecific and specific immune reactions, humoral and cell-medi-1 
ated immunity, effector cells, and diseases are also stressed; along with research and diagnostic 
methodologies. Prerequisites: BIOL 221 and BIOL 466; CHEM 221 and CHEM 222. 

CHEM-651. General Biochemistry Credit 3 (3-0) 

A study of modern biochemistry. This course emphasizes chemical kinetics and energetics 
associated with biological reactions and includes a study of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, 
vitamins, nucleic acids, hormones, photosynthesis, and respiration. Prerequisites: CHEM 431 
and CHEM 442. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 

ANSC-701. Environmental Topics in Animal Health Credit 3 (3-0) 

Influence of the environment upon the health status of animals within the disciplines of epide- 
miology, toxicology, pathobiology, reproductive physiology, nutrition, and microbiology. 

ANSC-702. Seminar in Animal Health Credit 1 (1-0) 

Seminar includes faculty, graduate students, and guest lectures on research, scientific methods, 
the publication process and related topics in the field of animal health sciences. 



70 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future, 



NSC-708. Special Problems in Animal Health Credit 2 (2-0) 

udependent investigations to strengthen the student's knowledge of the scientific methods, 
ivestigations are conducted within a variety of research areas congruent with the environmen- 
ts focus of the Animal Health Science program. 

■SC-712. Nutrition and Disease Credit 3 (3-0) 

he effect of altering the levels and ratios of nutrients upon the health of an animal and result- 
Lnt biochemical or biological processes. The effects of disease upon altered nutrient supply, 
prerequisite: ANSC 611 or permission of instructor. 

MSC-713. Global Livestock Systems Credit 3 (2-2) 

(fheoretical constructs of livestock systems in different agro-ecological zones and farming sys- 
,sms in the US and the world. Discussion of literature and research techniques related to animal 
j.iroduction in various systems. Economic contributions, environmental, and socio-political 
ynpact of domestic animals. 

VNSC-723. Animal Physiology Credit 3 (3-0) 

jin in-depth study of function and interrelationships among nervous, muscular, circulatory, 
{ jspiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems of laboratory and farm animals. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor. 

lNSC-771. Bioinformatics and Genome Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

'he course will be on bioinformatics and its application to genome analysis, computational 
ools and methods for organizing data, as well as large scale DNA sequencing, gene expression 
jnalysis methods and algorithms for basic and advanced search techniques. 

!lNSC-782. Cellular Pathobiology Credit 3 (3-0) 

Current concepts of the structure, function and pathobiology of the cell. Methodologies used to 
tudy the cell and its processes. Prerequisite: CHEM 651 or permission of instructor. 

iGRI 799. Thesis Research in Agriculture and Environmental 

Science Credit 1-6 (1-0) to 6 (6-0) 

I 

\GRI-999. Continuation of Thesis Credit 1 (1-0) 



Jncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 7 1 



Biology 

Goldie S. Byrd, Chairperson 

102 Barnes Hall 

(336) 334-7907 

gsbyrd@ncat.edu 

OBJECTIVES 

The Department's primary objective for the Master of Science degree program is to pre- 
pare students to enter and complete doctoral programs in order to become productive teachers 
and researchers. To support that objective, this program will develop in all participants, through 
research experiences, and other enrichment activities, independent thinking, creativity, critical 
judgment and personal integrity. Specifically, this program is designed to enhance the students' 
ability to design experiments, to analyze results, to become competent using state-of-the-art 
research equipment, enhance manipulative skills, and to improve the students' proficiency in 
oral and written communication. An additional critical objective is to enable students to score: 
at or above the 50th percentile on the GRE Subject Test in Biology after their first year in, 
residency. 

The Department's primary objective for the Master of Science, Secondary Education 
degree program is to enhance the ability of teaching professionals to convey the fundamental 
concepts of biology at the secondary level. Additionally, this program will develop, through 
experiential learning, instruction, and other creative activities, independent thinking, critical 
judgment and personal integrity, particularly as they relate to the learning process. The depart- 
ment will provide an environment for teaching professionals to undertake advanced studies: 
from the array of biological disciplines and expand their understanding of and appreciation for 
the world of living things. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Master of Science in Biology (Thesis Option) 

(30 semester hours including 6 hours of thesis research. Fifty percent of the accumulated hours 

must be at or above the 700 level.) 

Master of Science in Biology (Non-Thesis Option) 

(30 semester hours, including master's project. Fifty percent of the accumulated hours must be 

at or above the 700 level.) 

Master of Science in Biology, Secondary Education 

(39 semester hours of which 24 are to be in Biology and 15 are to be in Education. Fifty percent 
of the accumulated hours must be at or above the 700 level. There are two options in this 
degree program: thesis and non-thesis.) 

GENERAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to both graduate degree programs is consistent with the general 
admission requirements of the School of Graduate Studies. Specific Departmental require- 
ments are chosen to assure the success of students admitted to its graduate programs. A student 
wishing to be accepted as a candidate to either program must have completed, on the under- 
graduate level, chemistry through Organic II, one year of calculus, one year of physics (calcu- 
lus-based physics is preferred) and courses in cellular and molecular biology. Students lacking 
these requirements may be given provisional admission and be required to successfully com- 
plete some or all of these courses before being admitted to candidacy. All applicants must 
submit GRE scores (General and Subject Test in Biology) to the Graduate School. Applicants 



72 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



lust submit a personal statement highlighting their academic accomplishments and stating 
"ieir career goals. Applicants who submit transcripts from foreign institutions must provide 

redentials verified by a United States-based transcript verification service. In addition, the 
! faster of Science in Biology, Secondary Education requires the following: 

(a) Have two years of supervised instructional experience in a private or public school 
setting, laboratory instruction while enrolled in a graduate program, or as a lecturer in 
a community college or four-year college or university. , 

(b) Hold or obtain a North Carolina "A" Teaching Certificate at the elementary, middle, 
j or secondary level or its equivalent license from another state. 

•) (c) Submit official scores for the Graduate Record Examination General Test or Miller 

[j Analogies Test. 

J (d) Have an undergraduate overall GPA of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 scale. 

i (e) Submit a satisfactory essay providing a statement on the applicant's purpose for pur- 

5 suing a master's degree. 

Application deadlines for fall and spring semester admissions are July 15th and November 
j 5th, respectively. The student is advised to read the Graduate Bulletin very carefully for 
Additional graduate school requirements for admission to candidacy for a degree as well 
is other Departmental requirements. 

j 

« SPECIFIC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY (THESIS OPTION) 

H BIOL 862, 863 (Thesis Research, 6 semester hours) 

% BIOL 701 , 702 (Seminar, 2 semester hours) 

'5. CHEM 65 1 , 652 (Biochemistry, 5 semester hours) 

1. Complete a minimum of 17 additional semester hours bringing the total to 30 semester hours. 
Courses for graduate credit in Biology may be selected from Biology courses at the 600 - 800 
levels. Please note that fifty percent must come from courses at or above the 700 level. 

5. Maintain a 3.0 grade point average. 

5. Attend all Departmental Seminars. 

7. Satisfactorily complete an examination in a foreign language. 

$. Have at least one academic year of residence at A&T. 

). BIOL 788 (Comprehensive Examination, semester hours). This is the recording mecha- 
nism for students to meet the Comprehensive Examination requirement. The student must 
register for this "course" the semester he/she will take the Comprehensive Examination 
and the student must earn a P for pass. To sit for this examination the student must have a 
grade point average of 3 .00 or greater and must have successfully completed all graduate 
course work (except course work currently in progress). 

10. Satisfactorily present and defend the thesis. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY (NON-THESIS OPTION) 

1. BIOL 712 (Master's Project, 3 semester hours) 

2. BIOL 701 , 702 (Seminar, 2 semester hours) 

3. CHEM 65 1 , 652 (Biochemistry, 5 semester hours) 

%. Complete a minimum of 23 additional semester hours bringing the total to 33 semester hours. 
Courses for graduate credit in Biology may be selected from Biology courses at the 600 - 800 
levels. Please note that fifty percent must come from courses at or above the 700 level. 

5. Maintain a 3.0 grade point average. 

5. Attend all Departmental Seminars. 

7. Have at least one academic year of residence at A&T. 

Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 73 



8. BIOL 788 (Comprehensive Examination, semester hours). This is the recording mechai 
nism for students to meet the Comprehensive Examination requirement. The student must 
register for this "course" the semester he/she will take the Comprehensive Examination 
and the student must earn a P for pass. To sit for this examination the student must have 3 
grade point average of 3.00 or greater and must have successfully completed all graduate 
course work (except course work currently in progress). 

9. Satisfactorily complete and defend a Master's Project. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY, SECONDARY EDUCATION 

The Master of Science in Biology, Secondary Education program has two options; both 
require 39 hours of graduate course work. The thesis option requires BIOL 862, which includes 
thesis research carried out under the supervision of a thesis advisor. The non-thesis option 
requires the preparation of a product of learning portfolio (lectures, laboratories, demonstra- 
tions, etc.) developed from the area courses in biology and consistent with the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction's mandated curriculum. The learning portfolio will be assembled 
under the supervision of a graduate advisor. Under both options the student must: 

1 . Complete the 5 courses of the 15 credit hour Professional Core ( CUIN 619, CUIN 711 J 
CUIN 721 , CUIN 728, and CUIN 729). 

2. Complete 8 or more biology courses (24 semester hours) that are approved by the graduate 
advisor. 

3 . Maintain a 3 .0 grade point average 

4. Have at least one academic year of residence at A&T. 

5. Pass final comprehensive examinations in Biology and Education. BIOL 788 (Compre- 
hensive Examination, semester hours) is the recording mechanism for students to meet 
the Comprehensive Examination requirement in Biology. The student must register for 
this "course" the semester he/she will take the Comprehensive Examination and the stu- 
dent must earn a P for pass. To sit for this examination the student must have a grade point 
average of 3.00 or greater and must have successfully completed all graduate course work 
(except course work currently in progress). 

6. In the thesis option, satisfactorily present and defend the thesis. 

LIST OF GRADUATE COURSES 



Course 


Title 


Credits (lec-lab) 1 


BIOL 610 


Prokaryotic Biology 


4(2-4) 


BIOL 620 


Food Microbiology 


4 (2-4) 


BIOL 621 


Soil Microbiology 


4 (2-4) 


BIOL 630 


Molecular Genetics 


3 (3-0) 


BIOL 631 


Endocrine Physiology 


3 (3-0) 


BIOL 640 


Introduction to Bioinformatics and Genomic Research 


3 (1-4) 


BIOL 642 


Special Problems in Biology 


3 (2-2) 


BIOL 650 


Frontiers in Molecular Biology 


4 (2-4) 


BIOL 665 


Evolution 


3 (3-0) 


BIOL 667 


Animal Physiology 


3 (3-0) 


BIOL 671 


Principles of Immunology 


3 (3-0) 


BIOL 700 


Environmental Biology 


3 (3-0) 


BIOL 701 


Biological Seminar 


1 (0-2) 


BIOL 702 


Biological Seminar 


1 (0-2) 


BIOL 703 


Experimental Methods in Biology 


4 (2-4) 


BIOL 704 


Cell and Molecular Biology 


3 (3-0) 



74 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



JIOL712 Master's Project 3(0-6) 

1 JIOL 739 Radio-isotope Techniques and Radiotracer Methods 4 (2-4) 

JIOL 740 Essentials of Plant Anatomy 3 (2-2) 

BIOL 74 1 Applied Plant Ecology 3 (2-2) 

'BIOL 742 Physiology of Vascular Plants 3 (2-2) 

3IOL 743 Developmental Plant Morphology 3 (2-2) 

JIOL 744 Plant Nutrition 3 (2-2) 

3IOL 749 Recent Advances in Cell Biology 3 (3-0) 

3IOL750 Microscopy Technique 3(1-4) 

jBIOL 759 Experimental Developmental Biology 3(1-4) 

BIOL 765 Introductory Experimental Zoology 3 (2-2) 

jJBIOL 780 Animal Physiological Ecology 3 (3-0) 

£ BIOL 788 Comprehensive Examination (0-0) 

jBIOL 862 Biology Thesis I 3 (0-6) 

)3IOL 863 Biology Thesis II 3 (0-6) 

j COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN BIOLOGY 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses 

BIOL-610. Prokaryotic Biology Credit 4 (2-4) 

\ survey of the taxonomy, classification, ultrastructure, reproduction, physiology, and ecology 
uf selected bacteria and bacteriophages. The laboratory will emphasize self-instruction and 

independent study. Prerequisites: Biology 200 or 221; Biology 466. 

' 

BIOL-620. Food Microbiology Credit 4 (2-4) 

A survey of selected topics in food microbiology. Approximately one-third of the course will 
:over the metabolic pathways, organisms and processes involved with food production from 
(fermented dairy products, vegetables, fruits and meats. Food spoilage, preservation, infection, 
and intoxification will also be discussed. The laboratory will introduce students to the microor- 
ganisms involved with food production and spoilage. Prerequisites: Biology 200 or 221 . 

BIOL-621. Soil Microbiology Credit 4 (2-4) 

An introduction to the role of soil microorganisms in soil fertility. The activity of nitrogen- 
(fixing bacteria and those involved in the decomposition of organic waste materials will be 
emphasized. The laboratory will introduce students to the enumeration, distribution, and char- 
acterization of microorganisms important to soil microbiology. Prerequisites: Biology 200 or 
221. 

IBIOL-630. Molecular Genetics Credit 3 (3-0) 

DNA and RNA structure, function and processing in prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. Vari- 
ous aspects of recombinant DNA technology will be examined. Prerequisites: Biology 201 and 
466. 

SBIOL-631. Endocrine Physiology Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course would provide a basic introduction to endocrine function and include recent ad- 
vances in the field of endocrinology. Emphasis will be placed on general aspects of endocrine 
physiology, the organization of the endocrine system, mechanisms of hormone action, and 
control of endocrine secretion. Prerequisites: Biology 201 and 462. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 75 



BIOL-640. Introduction to Bioinformatics and Genomic Research Credit 3 (1-4)1 

The purpose of this course is to provide integrative experiences in computer and bench re- 
search in bioinformatics and genome science. Students will acquire hands-on experiences with 
web-based software and the tools research scientists are using to study the genomes of plants, 
microbes, humans and other organisms. They will input experimental data into one or more of j 
these databases to perform genetic analyses for making predictions about gene identity, struc- 
ture, function, similarities and phylogenetic relationships. They will also use the databases to' 
develop biochips, probes and primers for various laboratory applications. The integrative' 
bench work will involve testing results from database queries in the laboratory. This course will) 
merge education and research and where possible engage students in investigative activities , 
that involve collaborations with scientists on and off the campus. Prerequisites: BIOL 401 and. 
BIOL 466. (F,S) 

BIOL-650. Frontiers in Molecular Biology Credit 4 (2-4) j 

This course focuses on the theory, methods and applications of recombinant DNA technology. 
It includes special topics in molecular, cellular and developmental biology. The laboratory will, 
provide hands-on exposure to the polymerase chain reaction, gene sequencing, development of 
gene libraries and other techniques in molecular biology. 

BIOL-661. Mammalian Biology Credit 3 (3-0) 

A study of the evolutionary history, classification, adaptation and variation of representative 
mammals. Prerequisites: Biology 160 and 260. 

BIOL-665. Evolution Credit 3 (3-0) I 

This course will emphasize the genetics of populations and sources of genetic variation; causes 
of genetic change in populations including natural selection; speciation; and the evolutionary 
history of life on earth. Prerequisites: Biology 310 and 466. 

BIOL-667. Animal Physiology Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will provide students with an understanding of the current state of animal physiol- 
ogy at the level of the whole organism and its component organs and organ systems. Emphasis 
will be placed on function as it relates to survival of organisms in natural environments and on 
the regulation of homeostatic mechanisms. Topics would include metabolism, temperature regu- 
lation, reproductive mechanisms, circulation, gaseous exchange, nutrient processing, 
osmoregulation and ionic balance. Prerequisites: Biology 160 and 462. 

BIOL-671. Principles of Immunology Credit 3 (3-0) 

A study of mammalian immune responses; particularly in humans. Special emphasis will be 
placed on the physiology, genetics, and regulation of immune responses. Interrelationships 
between nonspecific and specific immune reactions, humoral and cell-mediated immunity, ef- 
fector cells, and diseases are also stressed; along with research and diagnostic methodologies. 
Prerequisites: Biology 221 and 466; Chemistry 221 and 222. 

Graduate Students Only 

BIOL-700. Environmental Biology Credit 3 (3-0) 

The scientific study of man's living and non-living environment. The course emphasizes how 
our technologies and cultures impact the earth's ability to sustain both human civilization and 
the earth's biodiversity. Prerequisites: None. 



76 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



IBIOL-701. Biological Seminar Credit 1 (0-2) 

'Faculty will present lectures on their research areas to acquaint students with research opportu- 
nities in the department. Prerequisites: None. 

fBIOL-702. Biological Seminar Credit 1 (0-2) 

Oral and written presentations by students on special topics and recent advances in the field of 
Biology. Strategies for writing a thesis will be discussed, and the preparation by students of a 
short proposal for thesis research will be encouraged. Prerequisites: None. 

JflHOL-703. Experimental Methods in Biology Credit 4 (2-4) 

An introduction to the scientific method, basic techniques, and equipment used in experimen- 
tal research in Biology. The course will provide a foundation for enabling students to initiate 
and conduct independent research. Prerequisites: None. 

'BIOL-704. Cell and Molecular Biology Credit 3 (3-0) 

< A course that integrates the most recent advances in molecular biology of structure and func- 

'tion in cells. Prerequisite: Biology 462. 

d 

BIOL-712. Master's Project Credit 3 (0-6) 

In this course the student will conduct a research project under the supervision of an advisor. A 

'written proposal, a final report, and an oral presentation and defense of the project before the 

'project committee are required. 

BIOL-739. Radio-isotope Techniques and Radiotracer Methods Credit 4 (2-4) 

'The techniques employed in the handling and measurement of radio-isotopes and their use as 

■tracer agents in biological investigations. 

r 

IBIOL-740. Essentials of Plant Anatomy Credit 3 (2-2) 

A study of the growth, development and organization of roots, stems, leaves, and reproductive 
'organs of higher plants. Lectures, discussions, field trips, and laboratories are employed in the 
presentation of this course. 
j 

1BIOL-741. Applied Plant Ecology Credit 3 (2-2) 

iA study of the relations of plants to their environment with emphasis on climate and soil factors 
j influencing their structure, behavior and distribution. Prerequisite: Biology 640, 740, or equivalent. 

MIOL-742. Physiology of Vascular Plants Credit 3 (2-2) 

f Selected topics on the physiology of higher plants. Relationships of light quality, intensity, and 
i periodicity to plant growth and reproduction, photosynthesis and photopheriodism. Chemical 
control of growth and reproduction, and the general aspect of plant metabolism. Lectures, con- 
Terences, laboratory work and field studies of higher plant ecology. 

BIOL-743. Developmental Plant Morphology Credit 3 (2-2) 

Growth and differentiation from a cellular viewpoint with emphasis on quantitative description 
iand experimental study of development phenomena. 

BIOL-744. Plant Nutrition • Credit 3 (2-2) 

A study of the subcellular organization of plants , inorganic and organic metabolism and respiration . 

! BIOL-749. Recent Advances in Cell Biology Credit 3 (3-0) 

A course designed to present recent trends concerning functions of organized cellular and sub- 
cellular systems. Current research as it relates to the molecular and fine structure basis of cell 
function, replication, and differentiation will be discussed. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 11 



BIOL-750. Microscopy Technique Credit 3 (1-4) 

This course is designed to develop the skills required to prepare cells, tissue, and organs for 
microscopic observation and study. Lectures will emphasize central concepts in microscopy. 
Prerequisites: Biology 201 and 462. Biology 465 is recommended. 

BIOL-759. Experimental Developmental Biology Credit 3 (1-4) 

This course is designed to provide students with a better understanding and appreciation of 
experimentation and experimental results in the area of developmental biology. Laboratory 
projects are experimental studies aimed at encouraging the reading and understanding of re- 
search papers in the literature. Prerequisite: Biology 561 or graduate standing. 

BIOL-765. Introductory Experimental Zoology Credit 3 (2-2) 

Studies of fertilization, breeding habits, regeneration, growth and differentiation of certain 
invertebrates and vertebrates from the experimental approach. Emphasis will be placed on 
laboratory procedures on the frog and the chick. 

BIOL-780. Animal Physiological Ecology Credit 3 (3-0) 

An introduction to the physiological adaptations of individuals that enable them to make the 
internal adjustments necessary to grow and reproduce in changing environments. This course 
will emphasize the physiological strategies for nutrient acquisition, gaseous exchange, water 
and ion balance, and thermal tolerance. Prerequisites: Biology 310 and 462. 

BIOL-788. Comprehensive Examination Credit (0-0) 

This course is the recording mechanism for students to meet the Comprehensive Examination 
requirement. The student must register for this "course" the semester he/she will take the Com- 
prehensive Examination and the student must earn a P for pass. 

BIOL-862. Biology Thesis I Credit 3 (0-6) 

Master's level research in biology. Prerequisite: Consent of advisor. 

BIOL-863. Biology Thesis II Credit 3 (0-6) 

Master's level research in biology. Prerequisites: Biology 862 and consent of advisor. 



78 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Chemical Engineering 



Leonard Uitenham, Department Chairperson 
Chemical Engineering - Master of Science 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

Each program in the Department is individually accredited and program requirements are 
] defined by the individual programs . 

OBJECTIVE 

The objective of the graduate program in Chemical Engineering is to provide advanced 
llevel study in chemical engineering. The program will serve as preparation for further ad- 
vanced study at the doctoral level or for advanced chemical engineering practice in industry. 

I DEGREE OFFERED 

i Master of Science in Chemical Engineering (MSChE) 

| GENERAL AND DEPARTMENTAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

All applicants to MSChE program must have earned a bachelor's degree from a four-year 
[college. Students that meet this requirement may be admitted to the graduate school. Appli- 
cants are admitted without discrimination of race, color, creed, sex, religion or national origin. 
Applicants may be admitted to graduate studies unconditionally, provisionally, or as special 
students. Unconditional admission to the Master of Science in Chemical Engineering will be 
[granted to graduates of ABET accredited chemical engineering programs that have attained a 
) minimum of a 3 .0 Grade Point Average on their overall undergraduate program of study. Provi- 
sional admission may be granted to persons with other qualifications. Applicants for provi- 
sional admission will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. 

A student admitted provisionally is required to meet with the CHEN Director to develop a 
list of undergraduate courses that must be taken to eliminate deficiencies in the undergraduate 
transcript. All provisionally admitted students must earn a minimum of a 3.0 grade point aver- 
age on the first nine graduate course credits they complete. In addition, a "B" grade point 
i average must be earned on all non-credit undergraduate courses, if any, required as a condition 
of admission. In addition to these provisions, other conditions may be imposed on a case-by- 
. case basis as approved by the Graduate School. 

The Master of Science in Chemical Engineering program consists of three distinct op- 
tions: a thesis option, a project option and a course work option. Requirements for each of the 
options are given below: 

( Option Semester Hours Required 

1 Thesis 24 Credits of Courses and 6 Credits of Thesis 

Project 30 Credits of Courses and 3 Credits of MS Project 

[ Course Work 33 Credits of Courses 

All students pursuing any of the MSChE options must complete four (4) courses from the 
MSChE core courses. In addition, students must enroll in the MSChE seminar each semester. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 79 



Seminar credits do not count toward graduation requirements. The four (4) core courses 
must be selected from the following list: 

Number Course Credit 

CHEN 620 Advanced Chemical Engineering Analysis 3 (3-0) 

CHEN 630 Transport Phenomena I 3 (3-0) 

CHEN 710 Transport Phenomena II 3(3-0) 

CHEN 720 Advanced Chemical Reaction Engineering 3 (3-0) 

CHEN 750 Separation Processes 3 (3-0) 

CHEN 760 Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 3 (3-0) 

Thesis Option: All students enrolled in this program must take six (6) credit hours of 
thesis and twenty-four (24) credit hours of courses. Of the twenty-four (24) credit hours of 
courses, at least nine credit hours of courses must be at the 700 level and at least four courses 
(12 credit hours) from the MSChE core courses list. With the approval of the thesis advisor, a 
student may take nine (9) credit hours of graduate courses from outside the CHEN Department 
in the areas of Mathematics, Science and Engineering. Thesis option students must pass an 
oral, public defense of their work. The defense is evaluated by a committee of at least three 
faculty who are appointed by the thesis advisor and the CHEN Director. The defense commit- 
tee serves as a professional review of the quality of the student's work and, in conjunction with 
the academic advisor, assists the student in the research work required for the thesis. An affir- 
mative vote by a majority of the committee after the defense is necessary for the student to 
pass. No comprehensive course exam is required. 

Project Option: This option requires 30 credits of course work and 3 credits of project 
work (CHEN 796). The advisor and student select a suitable project of mutual interest to both. 
No formal advisory committee is required for the option. The project option may interest those 
who wish to investigate a specific problem and write a technical report. Of the thirty credit 
hours of courses, at least twelve credit hours of courses must be at 700 level. Students must 
take four courses (12 credit hours) from the MSChE core courses. With the approval of the 
MSChE Director and/or project advisor, a student may take nine credit hours of graduate courses 
from outside the CHEN Department. In lieu of a final comprehensive examination, project 
option students must pass a public, oral defense of their project. The defense is evaluated by a 
committee of at least three faculty who are appointed by the project advisor and the CHEN 
Director. One of the committee members will be the student's advisor. An affirmative vote by 
a majority of the committee after the defense is necessary for the student to pass. No compre : 
hensive course exam is required. 

Course Work Option: This option requires 33 credits of course work approved by the 
advisor and MSChE Director. Of the thirty-three credit hours of courses, at least fifteen credit 
hours of courses must be at 700 level and at least fou? courses (12 credit hours) must be from 
the MSChE core courses. With the approval of the MSChE Director, a student may take nine 
credit hours of graduate courses from outside the CHEN Department. No formal advisory com- 
mittee is needed, but the student must select an advisor. Students wishing to receive advanced 
training without an interest in solving a publishable problem or in writing a technical report 
will be attracted to this option. Students in this option may be asked to pass a written compre- 
hensive examination. The examination follows the general course material of the student and is 
written by three or more examiners selected by the CHEN Director; one shall be the advisor. 
The student must satisfy the majority of examiners to pass the comprehensive examination. 
The examination is given during the student's final semester. 



80 • Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Advanced Undergraduate/Graduate Courses 

Title Credits 

Advanced Process Control 

Biochemical Engineering 

Bioseparations 

Fuels and Petrochemicals 

Air Pollution Control 

Advanced Chemical Engineering Analysis 

Pollution Prevention 

Basic Food Process Engineering 

Transport Phenomena 

Mixing Processes and Equipment Scale-up 

Computer Aided Process Design 

Environmental Remediation 

Nanostructured Materials and Engineering Applications 

Selected Topics in Chemical Engineering Var. 

Introduction to Polymer Science and Engineering 

Special Projects in Chemical Engineering 

Solids Processing and Particle Technology 

Biological Applications of Engineering 

Graduate Only Courses 

Transport Phenomena II 

Advanced Chemical Reaction Engineering 

Advanced Biochemical Engineering 

Advanced Chemical Process Design 

Separation Processes 

Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 

Special Chemical Engineering Project 

Special Topics 

Chemical Engineering Master's Seminar 

Master's Supervised Teaching 

Master's Supervised Research 

Master's Project 

Master's Thesis 



(Lee-Lab) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


Var. 1-3 


3 (3-0) 


Var. 1-3 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


1 (1-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 


3 (3-0) 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING COURSES AND DESCRIPTIONS 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE/ 
ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CHEN-600. Advanced Process Control Credit 3 (3-0) 

The course covers advanced methods for controlling chemical processes: adaptive control, 
feed forward control, cascade control, multivariable control, multi-loop control, decoupling, 
and dead time compensation. Emphasis is placed on computer design. Prerequisite: Senior 
standing in Chemical Engineering or permission of instructor. (DEMAND) 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



81 



CHEN-605. Biochemical Engineering Credit 3 (3-0 ( 

The course covers basic phenomena involved in biological systems, biochemical reaction sys, 
terns , microbiology, and biological processes . Application of engineering methods to the desigr 
and control of biological systems. Biochemical production of industrial chemicals. Biological 
waste treatment. Immobilized enzyme technology. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Chemical 
Engineering or permission of instructor. (DEMAND) 

CHEN-608. Bioseparations Credit 3 (3-OJ 

The course is an introduction to the separation and purification of biochemicals. Separation 
processes are characterized as primarily removal of insolubles, isolation of products, purifica-j 
tion or polishing. Processes covered include filtration, centrifugation, cell disruption, extraction, 
absorption, elution chromatography, precipitation, ultrafiltration, electrophoresis and crystallij 
zation. Students are required to complete a design project on a bioseparation process. Prerequisite! 
Senior standing in Chemical Engineering or permission of instructor. (DEMAND) 

CHEN-615. Fuels and Petrochemicals Credit 3 (3-0) 

Topics important to the production of fuels are covered. Topics include extraction and process^ 
ing of fossil fuels, synfuels, and fuels from renewable resources. Topics also include distillation 
refining, fermentation, catalytic reactions, and removal of undesirable by-products. The design^ 
of fuel processes include emphasis on economic and environmental impact. Prerequisite: Se- 
nior standing in Chemical Engineering or permission of instructor. (DEMAND) 

CHEN-618. Air Pollution Control Credit 3 (3-0) 

The economic, social and health implications of air pollution and its control are covered. Tq 
understand the problems better, the sources, types and characteristics of man-made air pollut-j 
ants will be discussed. The course will review some of the main regulations and engineering 
alternatives for achieving different levels of control. An air pollution control system will be| 
designed. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Chemical Engineering or permission of instructor; 
(Course is to be cross-referenced with CIEN 618) (DEMAND) 

CHEN-620. Advanced Chemical Engineering Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

Solution of chemical engineering problems by advanced mathematical techniques. Solution of 
uncoupled and coupled momentum, heat and mass transfer problems. Solution of linearized 
dynamic equations representing staged operations by matrix analysis. Advanced design and 
optimization of chemical processes. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Chemical Engineering or 
permission of instructor. (Fall) 

CHEN-622. Pollution Prevention Credit 3 (3-0) 

The concept of pollution prevention and its application through industrial ecology, risk assess- 
ment and life-cycle assessment methodologies are covered. Topics include pollution prevention! 
at the macroscale (industrial sector), mesocale (unit operations), and microscale (molecular 
interactions). A process involving membrane separation steps will be designed and analyzed. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing in Chemical Engineering or permission of instructor. (DEMAND) 

CHEN-625. Basic Food Process Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers basic food processing topics including food preparation operations. Topicsi 
included are slurry flow, processing operations, microbiology and health hazards, diseases and 
medicines, and their effects on humans. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Chemical Engineering 
or permission of instructor. (Fall) 

CHEN-630. Transport Phenomena Credit 3 (3-0) 

Aunified approach to momentum, energy, and mass transfer with emphasis on the microscopic 
approach. Development of the differential transport balances. Applications in solving simple 



82 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Chemical process problems. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Chemical Engineering or permis- 
sion of instructor. (Fall) 

CHEN-635. Mixing Processes and Equipment Scale-up Credit 3 (3-0) 

The courses cover practical design concepts of mixing and multi-phase processing in agitated 
i ;anks. Strategies for increasing plant throughput, improving contacting and mixing and select- 
ing equipment will be given. This course provides information on: 1) judging the level of 
^difficulty of a mixing process; 2) using practical elements of laminar, transitional and turbulent 
"mixing; 3) mixing times and 4) increasing throughput for all types of systems and power. The 
course treats jet mixing, gas sparged mixing and mechanical mixing. The course provides basic 
concepts on using pilot plant studies for process translation and scale-up. Prerequisite: Senior 
standing in Chemical Engineering or permission of instructor. (Spring) 

CHEN-640. Computer-Aided Chemical Process Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

The development and use of computer-aided models for process equipment design is stressed. 
'Model results are compared with the ASPEN PLUS simulation package. Students study the 
interrelationships between design and process variables using computer simulation. Optimiza- 
tion methods are applied to chemical process design. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Chemical 
"Engineering or permission of instructor. (DEMAND) 

CHEN-645. Environmental Remediation Credit 3 (3-0) 

The course introduces students to traditional and developmental methods for removal and detoxi- 
'fication of hazardous wastes at contaminated sites and from industrial waste streams. Chemical, 
'thermal, biological and physical methods of remediation are covered. The course deals with 
■hazardous wastes in soils, groundwater, surface water, wastewater ponds and tanks. The em- 
phasis is on destruction, removal and containment methods using mathematical models for 
^contaminate fate and transport. Recent advances in emerging technologies are also discussed. 
T Each student will complete an environmental remediation design project. Prerequisite: Senior 
standing in Chemical Engineering or permission of instructor. (DEMAND) 

ICHEN-655. Nanostructured Materials and Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course reviews and analyzes modern chemical engineering material processing technolo- 
gies. Chemical vapor deposition, crystallization, electrochemical deposition, electroplating and 
^supercritical fluid-based processing techniques for the production of nanostructured materials 
'are discussed. This course also covers the effects of parameters (such as lattice structure, mate- 
rial composition, nucleation, crystal growth phenomena, chemical bonding, etc.) on the catalytic, 
/electronic, optical and physical properties of metallic and ceramic materials. Prerequisite: Se- 
inior standing in Chemical Engineering or permission of instructor. (DEMAND) 

CHEN-660. Selected Topics in Chemical Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

Topics covered include selected chemical engineering topics of interest to students and faculty. 
'The topics will be selected before the beginning of the course and will be pertinent to the 
'programs of the students enrolled. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Chemical Engineering or 
permission of instructor. (DEMAND) 

CHEN-665. Introduction to Polymer Science & Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of polymer science and engineering. Topics 
i included are polymerization reaction mechanisms and kinetics, molecular weight distribution 
and measurement methods, crystallinity, morphology and phase transitions, structure-property 
relationships, solution properties and melt rheology. Commonly used polymer characterization 
techniques will be introduced. Industrial examples will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Senior 
standing in Chemical Engineering or permission of instructor. (DEMAND) 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 83 



CHEN-666. Special Projects in Chemical Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

Study arranged on a special chemical engineering topic of interest to both student and faculty! 
member who will act as supervisor. Topics may be analytical and /or experimental and should 
encourage independent study. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Chemical Engineering or per 
mission of instructor. (Fall, Spring) 

CHEN-670. Solids Processing and Particle Technology Credit 3 (3-0 j 

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of solids processing and particle technology 
Topics included are properties of particles, transport of particles, size reduction, size enlarge- 
ment, filtration, centrifugation, clarification, drying of solids, crystallization, flotation, and 
safety hazards of fine powders. Industrial examples will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Senior 
standing in Chemical Engineering or permission of instructor. (DEMAND) 

MCEN-610. Biological Applications of Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers the application of engineering principles and methods to problems in medi- 
cine, the integration of engineering with biology, and the emerging industrial opportunities 
Examples from a variety of engineering disciplines will be provided. The ethical concerns 
associated with some emerging life science applications will be explored. Lab experiments 
will be utilized in the course to provide hands-on experience with life science concepts. Re- 
quired is a research paper on an emerging application of life science in engineering. Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor. (Spring) 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE ONLY COURSES 

CHEN-710. Transport Phenomena II Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is an advanced treatment of the mechanisms of momentum, heat and mass trans- 
port. Emphasis is on methods of solution of transport problems for coupled systems where two 
or more transport processes interact. Other topics include Non-Newtonian Flow, Boundary 
Layer Theory, and the Analysis and solution of transport problems of significance in chemical 
processes. (DEMAND) 

CHEN-720. Advanced Chemical Reaction Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course includes an advanced treatment of chemical reaction engineering including the 
effect of non-ideal flow and fluid mixing on reactor design, as well as multi-phase reaction 
system and heterogeneous catalysis and catalytic kinetics. (Fall) 

CHEN-730. Advanced Biochemical Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is the study of advanced topics in biochemical engineering and enzyme engineer- 
ing, highlighting research trends. Modeling and optimization of biochemical systems are also' 
covered, as well as the design and analysis of enzyme reactors and the use of enzymes in 
industrial, environmental and medical applications. (DEMAND) 

CHEN-740. Advanced Chemical Process Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

Topics in advanced conceptual process engineering such as process analysis, process synthesis 
and process optimization are covered. Specific topics include: flowsheeting, design variable 
selection, computational algorithm formulation, separation sequences, heat exchanger networks, 
recycle-purge processes, process design and simulation software development, including physical 
and thermodynamic properties packages. (DEMAND) 



84 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



CHEN-750. Separation Processes Credit 3 (3-0) 

^Differential and equilibrium stage operations involving non-isothermal and multi-component 
) systems are covered. Other topics covered include simultaneous mass transfer and chemical 
Treaction and dispersion effects. Applications to operations such as absorption, extraction, chro- 
matography, distillation, ion exchange, and membrane separation are also studied. (Spring) 

ifCHEN-760. Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics Credit 3 (3-0) 

llThis is an advanced course covering topics in molecular thermodynamics of fluid phase equi- 
libria. Statistical thermodynamics and thermodynamics of nonequilibrium processes are 
p introduced. (Spring) 

| CHEN-786. Special Chemical Engineering Project Credit 3 (3-0) 

i The course is intended for students who want to complete an analytical or experimental project 
|(of interest to the student and instructor. The course may be completed by Project Option stu- 
iidents, but does not substitute for Master's project. (Fall, Spring) 

^CHEN-789. Special Topics Credit 3 (3-0) 

,jA course designed to allow the introduction of potential new courses on a trial basis or the 
,offering of special course topics on a once-only basis. The course may be offered to individuals 
J or groups of students. A definite topic and the title must be agreed upon by the advisor before 
the student registers for the course. (DEMAND) 

CHEN-792. Master's Seminar Credit 1 (1-0) 

This course provides a forum for the presentation and discussion of selected topics of interest 
to chemical engineers such as faculty research interests, communication, 'safety, job prospects 
('and research results. (Fall, Spring) 
•i > 

a CHEN-793. Master's Supervised Teaching Credit 3 (3-0) 

^Students will gain teaching experience under the mentorship of a faculty member who assists 
[/the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observes and provides feedback to the 
student during the teaching assignment, and evaluates the student upon completion of the as- 
signment. (DEMAND) 

3 CHEN-794. Master's Supervised Research Credit 3 (3-0) 

ifStudents will receive instruction in how to plan, organize and perform research. Research will 
be performed under the mentorship of a member of the graduate faculty. (DEMAND) 

(lCHEN-796. MS Chemical Engineering Project Credit 3 (3-0) 

.{This is an independent, analytical or experimental project involving research or design in an 
oi area of interest to the instructor and the student. This course must be completed by, and only by, 
o^Master of Science in Chemical Engineering (MSChE) project option students. A written pro- 
posal must be submitted to outline the project. A written report and an oral defense are required. 
(Fall, Spring, Summer) 
\ 

sCHEN-797. Master's Thesis Credit 3 (3-0) 

^Master of Science thesis research will be conducted under the supervision of the thesis com- 
, mittee chairperson leading to the completion of the master's thesis. The course is only available 
[to thesis option students. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 



j Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 85 



Chemistry 

Claude N. Lamb, Interim Chairperson 

Room 116, Hines Hall 

(336) 334-7601 

OBJECTIVES 

The objective of the Graduate Division in Chemistry is to provide the theoretical and 
experimental training experiences necessary for those students pursuing a Master of Science 
degree in Chemistry. The Department also offers special courses that may be used for teacher 
renewal certificates. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Master of Science - Chemistry 

Master of Science - Chemistry, Secondary Education 

Computational Science and Engineering - Interdisciplinary Masters of Science 

Energy and Environmental Studies - Interdisciplinary Ph.D. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Admission to the Graduate School under one of the following options: 

1 . Unconditional admission 

2. Provisional admission 

3. Post-baccalaureate (PBS) 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Admission to degree programs for the Master of Science in Chemistry and the Master of Sci- 
ence in Chemistry, Secondary Education require: 

1 . Baccalaureate degree from an accredited undergraduate institution Admission to the 
Master of Science in Chemistry requires: 

2. An undergraduate major in chemistry that includes one year of physical chemistry 
and one year of differential and integral calculus. 

Admission to the Master of Science in Chemistry Education also requires the following: 

1 . Official scores of the GRE or MAT Test 

2. NC Class A licensure in Education (secondary) or the equivalent from another state 

3. A passing score on the indexed rating for admissions criteria 

4. A satisfactory essay providing a statement of purpose for Master's degree study 

5. Satisfactory recommendations from three professional educators 

M.S. in Chemistry - Thesis Option 

Must complete the following: 
1 . Required Courses 

Chemistry 7 1 1 — Structural Inorganic Chemistry 

Chemistry 722 — Advanced Organic Chemistry 

Chemistry 743 — Chemical Thermodynamics 

Chemistry 70 1 — Seminar 

Chemistry 732 — Advanced Analytical Chemistry 

Chemistry 799 — Thesis Research 

Chemistry 702 — Chemical Research 

(A maximum of 9 hrs. may be earned in 702) 



86 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



i 2. Other Requirements 

I a. 2-9 semester hours in electives 

b . S atisf actory completion of an examination in foreign language or computer language 

c. Pass comprehensive examinations in three of the five major areas of chemistry: 
analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic and physical. The comprehensive 
examination must be passed within two sittings for any areas being tested 

d. Satisfactory presentation and defense of a thesis. 

e. One academic year of residence at A&T 

i 

;M. S. in Chemistry - Project Option 

This option requires 30 hours of course work and 3 credits of project research (Chem. 
703). The advisor and the student select a suitable project of mutual interest to both. A 
formal advisory committee is required for this option. The project advisor appoints the 
project committee members after consultation with the student. All project option students 
must write a final report on their project and defend their findings in a public seminar. The 
project report and project defense, are evaluated by a project committee composed of 
three faculty members, one of which is the project advisor. An affirmative vote by the 
majority of the project committee, after the project defense, is required for the student to 
pass. Of the 33 credit hours of course work required, at least 17 credits must be at the 700 
levels. The recommended courses are as follows: 

1. Required Courses (17 Credit hours) Credit 

Chemistry 701 Seminar 1.0 

Chemistry 711 Structural Inorganic Chemistry 3.0 

Chemistry 722 Advanced Organic Chemistry 3.0 

Chemistry 732 Advanced Analytical Chemistry 3.0 

Chemistry 743 Chemical Thermodynamics 3.0 

Chemistry 703 Masters Project Research 3.0 

Chemistry 7 1 5 , 725 , 735 , 745 , or 755 1 .0 

2. Electives (16 Credit hours) 

Students are required to complete a minimum of 1 1 Cr. Hrs. from the Chemistry electives 
and the other 5 Cr. Hrs. from Chemistry and/or non-chemistry electives listed below: 

Chemistry electives Credit 

Chemistry 610 Inorganic Synthesis 2.0 

Chemistry 611 Advanced Inorganic 3.0 

Chemistry 621 Intermediate Organic 3.0 

Chemistry 65 1 General Biochemistry 3 .0 

Chemistry 652 General Biochemistry Lab 2.0 

Chemistry 663* Selected Topics in Chem. Instruction I 1 .0 

Chemistry 664* Selected Topics in Chem. Instruction II 1 .0 
Any 700 level courses included in the Department's regular offerings. 

*These courses are required for Graduate Teaching Assistants 

Non-Chemistry electives 

Any 600 or 700 level course from the College of Arts and Sciences, School of Agriculture 
and Environmental Sciences or College of Engineering 

3. Other requirements 

a. Satisfactory completion of an examination in foreign language or computer language 

b. Satisfactory presentation and defense of the project 



j Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 87 



c. One academic year of residence at A&T 

d. Student must pass comprehensive examinations in three of the following five areas: 
analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. The comprehen- 
sive examinations must be passed within two sitting for any areas being tested. 

M.S. in Chemistry Education: Thirty nine (39) semester hours required. 

The Master of Science in Chemistry Education program consists of a thesis option or a 
special project option. Both options require 15 semester hours of Professional Education, 
17 semester hours of chemistry and 7 semester hours of chemistry electives. Elective courses 
may come from chemistry courses at the 600 and 700 levels. In addition the student must: 

1 . Maintain a 3 .0 grade point average 

2. Present a seminar to faculty and students of the Chemistry Department upon comple- 
tion of the thesis or research project 

3. In the thesis option, satisfactorily present and defend the thesis 

Professional Education Core Requirements (15 Credit hours) 



Course 

CUIN711 
CUIN713 
CUIN 746 
CUIN712 
CUIN 721 



Title 

Research and Inquiry 
Learning Theories 
Technology 
Diversity 
Advanced Methods 



Required Chemistry Courses (17 Credit hours) 

Course Title 

CHEM 7 1 1 Structural Inorganic Chemistry 

CHEM 722 Advanced Organic Chemistry 

CHEM 732 Advanced Analytical Chemistry 

CHEM 743 Chemical Thermodynamics 

CHEM 702 Chemical Research 

CHEM 701 Seminar 



Credit 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

Credit 

3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
1 



COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

Course Title Credit 

CHEM 610 Inorganic Synthesis 2 

CHEM 611 Advanced Inorganic 3 

CHEM 621 Intermediate Organic Chemistry 3 

CHEM 624 Qualitative Organic Chemistry 3 

CHEM 63 1 Electroanalytical Chemistry 3 

CHEM 632 Environmental Chemistry 3 

CHEM 641 Radiochemistry 3 

CHEM 642 Radioisotope Techniques and Application 2 

CHEM 643 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics 4 

CHEM 651 General Biochemistry 3 

CHEM 652 General Biochemistry Lab 2 

CHEM 673 Introduction to Computational Chemistry 3 

CHEM 674 Computational Methods in Protein Modeling and Drug Design 3 



88 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 



-Inorganic) 
Course 
CHEM 711 
CHEM 716 

Organic) 
>CHEM 721 

CHEM 722 

CHEM 723 
.CHEM 726 

CHEM 727 

'Biochemistry) 

CHEM 756 

| 
'Analytical Chemistry) 

CHEM 73 1 Modern Analytical Chemistry 

CHEM 732 Advanced Analytical Chemistry 

CHEM 736 Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry 



Title 

Structural Inorganic Chemistry 
Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry 

Elements of Organic Chemistry 
Advanced Organic Chemistry 
Organic Chemistry 
Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry 
Organic Preparations 

Selected Topics in Biochemistry 



'Physical Chemistry) 



CHEM 741 
)CHEM 742 
CHEM 743 
CHEM 744 
CHEM 746 
CHEM 748 
CHEM 749 



Principles of Physical Chemistry I 

Principles of Physical Chemistry II 

Chemical Thermodynamics 

Chemical Spectroscopy 

Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry 

Colloid Chemistry 

Chemical Kinetics 



Credit 

3 
3 



RESEARCH AND SPECIAL TOPICS 

:HEM701 Seminar 

:HEM 702 Chemical Research 

"HEM 715 Special Problems in Inorganic Chemistry 

"HEM 725 Special Problems in Organic Chemistry 

"HEM 735 Special Problems in Analytical Chemistry 

"HEM 745 Special Problems in Physical Chemistry 

"HEM 755 Special Problems in Biochemistry 

CHEMICAL INSTRUCTION 

:HEM 663 Selected Topics in Chemistry INSTRUCTION I 

:HEM 664 Selected Topics in Chemistry INSTRUCTION II 

:HEM 765 Special Problems in Chemistry INSTRUCTION I 

:HEM 766 Special Problems in Chemistry INSTRUCTION II 

:HEM 767 Special Problems in Chemistry INSTRUCTION III 

:HEM 768 Special Problems in Chemistry INSTRUCTION IV 



1 

•2-5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



89 



COURSES WITH DESCRIPTION IN CHEMISTRY 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

CHEM-610. Inorganic Synthesis Credit 2 (1-3) 

Discussion of theoretical principles of synthesis and development of manipulative skills in the 
synthesis of inorganic substances. Prerequisites: One year of organic chemistry; one semester 
of quantitative analysis. 

CHEM-611. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Credit 3 (3-0) 

A course in the theoretical approach to the systematization of inorganic chemistry. Prerequi- 
site: Chemistry 442. 

CHEM-621. Intermediate Organic Chemistry Credit 3 (3-0) 

An in-depth examination of various organic mechanisms, reactions, structures, and kinetics. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 222. 

CHEM-624. Qualitative Organic Chemistry* Credit 5 (3-6) 

A course in the systematic identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: One year of Or- 
ganic Chemistry. 

CHEM-631. Electroanalytical Chemistry Credit 3 (3-0) 

A study of the theory and practice of polarography, chronopotentionmetry, potential sweep 
chronoampereometry and electrodeposition. The theory of diffusion and electrode kinetics will 
also be discussed along with the factors that influence rate processes, the double layer, absorp- 
tion and catalytic reactions. Prerequisite: Chemistry 431 or equivalent. 

CHEM-632. Environmental Chemistry Credits 3 (3-0) 

This course begins with an overview of environmental science and technology. The course 
covers the study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species in 
water, soil, and air. Different types of water pollutants, inorganic and organic air pollutants and 
pollutants in the soil will be discussed in detail. Sources, chemistry, and treatment of hazardous 
wastes will also be addressed. Finally, some of the analytical methods used in the determina- 
tion of water and air pollutants will be covered in this course. Prerequisites: CHEM 221, 231, 
and 43 1 or permission of the instructor. 

CHEM-641. Radiochemistry Credit 3 (3-0) 

A study of the fundamental concepts, processes, and applications of nuclear chemistry, includ- 
ing natural and artificial radioactivity, sources, and chemistry of the radioelements. Open to 
advanced majors and others with sufficient background in chemistry and physics. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 442 or Physics 406. 

CHEM-642. Radioisotope Techniques and Applications Credit 2 (1-3) 

The techniques of measuring and handling radioisotopes and their use in chemistry, biology, 
and other fields. Open to majors and non-majors. Prerequisite: Chemistry 102 or 105 or 107. 

CHEM-643. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics Credit 4 (4-0) 

Non-relativistic wave mechanics and its application to simple systems of means of the operator 
formulation. Prerequisites: Chemistry 442 and Physics 222. Corequisite: Mathematics 300. 

CHEM-651. General Biochemistry Credit 3 (3-0) 

A study of modern biochemistry. The course emphasizes chemical kinetics and energetics associ- 
ated with biological reactions and includes a study of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins, 
nucleic acids, hormones, photosynthesis, and respiration. Prerequisites: Chemistry 431 and 442. 



90 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



CHEM-652. General Biochemistry Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is a companion laboratory to Chemistry 65 1 . Experimentation will include isolation and 
characterization of biochemical substances as well as studies of physical properties. Students 
will be introduced to a variety of techniques including high performance liquid chromatogra- 
phy, electrophoresis, and centrifugation. Corequisite: Chemistry 651 . Prerequisites: Chemistry 
432 and 444. 

CHEM-673. Introduction to Computational Chemistry Credits 3 (2-2) 

This course introduces students to the basic principles of classical and quantum mechanics and 
their application to solving chemical/biochemical problems. A hands-on approach will be taken 
with equal time being spent in the classroom and in the laboratory. Prerequisites: CHEM 107, 
PHYS 242, and MATH 231 or their equivalent. 

CHEM -674. Computational Methods in Protein Modeling and 

Drug Design Credits 3 (2-2) 

This course introduces various computational chemistry methods involved in modeling macro- 
molecular proteins and structure-based drug design. A hands-on approach will be taken with 
equal time being spent in class and the laboratory. The course includes homology modeling, ab 
initio threading methods to model proteins from sequence to three-dimensional structures, 
chemoinformatics and structure-based drug design methods such as QSAR and docking. Pre- 
requisite: CHEM 673 

* Students are required to purchase supplemental materials for this course. 

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 
Graduate Students Only 

CHEM-711. Structural Inorganic Chemistry Credit 3 (3-0) 

A study of the stereochemistry and electronic properties of inorganic substances. Emphasis will 
be placed upon applications of group theory and upon spectroscopic and physical methods. 

CHEM-716. Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry Credit 3 (3-0) 

A lecture course on advanced topics of Inorganic Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 611 or 
permission of the instructor. 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 
Graduate Students Only 

CHEM-721. Elements of Organic Chemistry Credit 3 (2-3) 

A systematic study of the classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds and individual examples 
of each. Structure, nomenclature, synthesis, and characteristic reactions will be considered. 
Illustration of the familiarity of organic substances in everyday life will be included. In the 
laboratory, preparation and characterization reactions will be performed. 

CHEM-722. Advanced Organic Chemistry Credit 3 (3-0) 

Recent developments in the areas of structural theory, stereochemistry, molecular rearrange- 
ment and mechanism of reactions of selected classes of organic compounds. Prerequisite: One 
year of Organic Chemistry or Chemistry 721 . 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 9 1 



CHEM-723. Organic Chemistry Credit 2 (2-0) 

An advanced treatment of organic reactions designed to give students a working knowledge of 
the scope and limitations of the important synthetic methods of Organic Chemistry. Prerequi- 
site: Chemistry 722. 

CHEM-726. Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry Credit 3 (3-0) 

A lecture course on advanced topics in Organic Chemistry. 

CHEM-727. Organic Preparations Credit 1-2 (0-2 to 4) 

An advanced laboratory course. Emphasis is placed on the preparation and purification of more 
complex organic compounds. Prerequisite: One year of Organic Chemistry. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 
Graduate Students Only 

CHEM-756. Selected Topics in Biochemistry Credit 3 (3-0) 

A lecture course on advanced topics in Biochemistry. 

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

Graduate Students Only 

CHEM-731. Modern Analytical Chemistry Credit 3 (2-3) 

The theoretical bases of Analytical Chemistry are presented in detail. In the laboratory, these 
principles, together with a knowledge of chemical properties, are used to identify substances 
and estimate quantities in unknown samples. 

CHEM-732. Advanced Analytical Chemistry Credit 3 (3-0) 

A lecture course in which the theoretical bases of Analytical Chemistry and their application in 
analysis will be reviewed with greater depth than is possible in the customary undergraduate 
courses. Equilibrium processes, including proton and electron transfer reactions and matter- 
energy interactions, will be considered. Prerequisite: One year of Analytical Chemistry or 
Chemistry 731. 

CHEM-736. Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry Credit 3 (3-0) 

A lecture course on advanced topics in Analytical Chemistry. 

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 
Graduate Students Only 

CHEM-741. Principles of Physical Chemistry I Credit 3 (3-0) 

A review of the fundamental principles of Physical Chemistry, including the derivation of the 
more important equations and their application to the solution of problems. Prerequisite: Math- 
ematics 606 or 622. 

CHEM-742. Principles of Physical Chemistry II Credit 3 (3-0) 

A continuation of Chemistry 741 . May be taken concurrently with Chemistry 741 . 

CHEM-743. Chemical Thermodynamics Credit 3 (3-0) 

An advanced course in which the laws of thermodynamics will be considered in their applica- 
tion to chemical processes. Prerequisite: Chemistry 442 or 742. 



92 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



CHEM-744. Chemical Spectroscopy Credit 3 (2-3) 

An advanced course in which the principles and applications of spectroscopy will be consid- 
ered. Prerequisite: Chemistry 442 or 742. 

CHEM-746. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry Credit 3 (3-0) 

A lecture course on advanced topics in Physical Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 442 or 
742. 

CHEM-748. Colloid Chemistry Credit 2 (2-0) 

A study of the types of colloidal systems and the fundamental principles governing their prepa- 
ration and behavior. Prerequisite: Chemistry 442 or 742. 

CHEM-749. Chemical Kinetics Credit 4 (4-0) 

A study of the theory of rate processes; application to the study of reaction mechanisms. Pre- 
requisites: Mathematics 222 and Chemistry 442 or 742. 

RESEARCH AND SPECIAL PROBLEMS 

Graduate Students Only 

CHEM-663. Selected Topics in Chemistry Instruction I Credit 1 (1-0) 

A study of the curriculum and educational materials developed for use in the Thirteen College 
Curriculum Program in Physical Science. 

CHEM-664. Selected Topics in Chemistry Instruction II Credit 1 (1-0) 

A continuation of Chemistry 663 

CHEM-701. Seminar Credit 1 (1-0) 

Presentation and discussion of library or laboratory research problems. 

CHEM-702. Chemical Research Credit 2-5 (0.6 to 15) 

A course designed to permit qualified students to do original research in chemistry under the 
supervision of a senior staff member. May be taken for credit more than once. 

CHEM-703. Masters Project Research Credit 3 (3-0) 

The student will conduct advanced research of interest to the student and the instructor. Awritten 
proposal, which outlines the nature of the project and the deliverables, must be submitted for 
approval. This course is only available to project option students. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 

CHEM-715. Special Problems in Inorganic Chemistry Credit 1 (0-2) 

A laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the techniques of chemical research by 
solving minor problems in Inorganic Chemistry. May be taken for credit more than once. 

CHEM-725. Special Problems in Organic Chemistry Credit 1 (0-2) 

A laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the techniques of chemical research by 
solving minor problems in Organic Chemistry. May be taken for credit more than once. 

CHEM-735. Special Problems in Analytical Chemistry Credit 1 (0-2) 

A laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the techniques of chemical research by 
solving minor problems in Analytical Chemistry. May be taken for credit more than once. 

CHEM-745. Special Problems in Physical Chemistry Credit 1 (0-2) 

A laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the techniques of chemical research by 
solving minor problems in Physical Chemistry. May be taken for credit more than once. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 93 



CHEM-755. Special Problems in Biochemistry Credit 1 (0-2) 

A laboratory course designed to introduce the student to the techniques of chemical research by 
solving minor problems in Biochemistry. May be taken for credit more than once. 

CHEM-765. Special Problems in Chemistry Instruction I Credit 3 (3-0) 

A course designed to introduce students to techniques of Chemistry instruction at the college 
level. 

CHEM-766. Special Problems in Chemistry Instruction II Credit 3 (3-0) 

A continuation of Chemistry 765. 

CHEM-767. Special Problems in Chemistry Instruction III Credit 3 (3-0) 

A continuation of Chemistry 766. 

CHEM-768. Special Problems in Chemistry Instruction IV Credit 3 (3-0) 

A continuation of Chemistry 767. 

CHEM-799. Thesis Research I Credit 3 (3-0) 

A course designed for conducting thesis research under the supervision of the thesis committee 
chairperson leading to the completion of the master's thesis. This course is only available to 
thesis option students. Prerequisite: Permission of advisor. 

CHEM-999. Thesis Research II Credit (0-0) 

A continuation of Chemistry 799. A written thesis must be produced and an oral thesis defense 
is required. 



94 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future^ 



Civil and Environmental Engineering 



Peter Rojeski, Jr., Chairperson 
Civil, Architectural, Agricultural and Environmental Engineering Department 

448 McNair Hall 

(336) 334-7575 

rojeski @ neat .edu 

Emmanuel U. Nzewi, Director Abolghasem Shahbazi, Director, 

Z!ivil and Environmental Engineering Program Bioenvironmental Engineering Program 

1*33 McNair Hall Sockwell Hall 

336) 334-7737 (336) 334-7787 

izewi@ncat.edu gayle@ncat.edu 

The Master of Science program in Civil Engineering is administered by the Civil, Archi- 
ectural, Agricultural and Environmental Engineering (CAAE) Department and is designed to 
iccommodate graduates from Civil and Environmental Engineering, Architectural Engineer- 
ng, and Bioenvironmental Engineering. The program also accepts qualified graduates from 
"other closely related academic fields. 

( OBJECTIVE 

The objective of the Civil Engineering graduate program is to provide educational oppor- 
unities to professionals in the Piedmont Triad for advanced study and research in the follow- 
ng areas: Environmental/Water Resources, Structures/Geotechnical, Transportation/Regional 
Development, and Energy Resources/Systems. 

One or more courses in each of the above areas are scheduled every semester and are 
offered when student demand meets the University's minimum enrollment requirement. Stu- 
ients may, therefore, be required to adjust their curriculum plan in response to the availability 
)f courses. 

DEGREE OFFERED 

Master of Science - Civil Engineering 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

All applicants for graduate study must have earned a bachelor's degree from a four-year 
lecredited college. Prospective students must follow all current procedures of the School of 
Graduate Studies. 

The minimum requirement for unconditional admission to the Master of Science in Civil 
Engineering Program is an undergraduate degree from an ABET accredited Civil Engineering, 
Architectural Engineering, or Bioenvironmental Engineering program with a minimum of 3.0 
out of 4.0) Grade Point Average on the overall undergraduate program of study. The other two 
categories of admission, provisional and special student, may also be used on a case-by-case 
oasis as described below. 

Persons may be admitted provisionally to the MSCE program if any of the following 
conditions apply: 

1 . The undergraduate degree is not from an ABET accredited CAAE program, 

2. The undergraduate degree is not engineering but in a closely related curriculum with 
a substantial engineering science content, 

3 . Deficiencies revealed in the analysis of the undergraduate transcript may be removed 
by the inclusion of no more than 12 semester credit hours. 



Jncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 95 



A student admitted provisionally would be required to meet with a graduate program cooi 
dinator to develop a list of undergraduate courses that must be taken to eliminate deficiencie 
in the undergraduate preparation for graduate study. All provisionally admitted students mus 
earn a 3.0 grade point average on the first nine graduate course credits completed. In additior 
a 3.0 grade point average must be earned on all undergraduate courses if any were required a 
a condition of admission. 

Students who do not hold an engineering undergraduate degree may have course deficier 
cies exceeding 12 semester credits. These students can be considered for special student statu 
until such time that their deficiencies are reduced so that they can qualify for provisional ac 
mission. Persons with massive undergraduate deficiencies, even though they might hold a' 
undergraduate degree, are asked to apply as transfer students to the undergraduate Civil Eng 
neering program. Make-up courses will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis dependent on th ! 
student's area of interest. 

Students who are not seeking a graduate degree at NC A&T are also classified as speci; 
students. They are admitted to take courses for self-improvement. If a student subsequentl 
wishes to pursue a degree program, he/she must request an evaluation of his/her record. Th 
School of Graduate Studies reserves the right to refuse to accept credits earned while bein 
enrolled as a special student towards a degree program; under no circumstances may the sti 
dent apply towards a degree program more than twelve semester hours of graduate credit 
earned as a special student. 

In addition to the above application material, foreign nationals or people whose" mothe 
tongue is not English are required to provide special information concerning English prof 
ciency and finances. Specifically, these applicants are required to take the standardized "Te> 
of English as a Foreign Language" (TOEFL) and achieve a minimum score of 550. 

The School of Graduate Studies accepts application from students who already hold 
Master's degree in other fields or disciplines, but wish to earn a MSCE degree. Consistent wit 
NC AT&T's School of Graduate Studies' policy, applicants holding a Master's degree in ar 
other engineering discipline from NC A&T need only complete 18 credit hours to earn a MSC 
degree. If the applicant holds an engineering Master's degree from outside NC A&T, a max 
mum of 6 credit hours of course work may be transferred. 

GENERAL DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

A student pursuing a Master of Science in Civil Engineering has the following three options 

1) All course work option 

2) Project option, and 

3) Thesis option 

All students pursuing a Master of Science in Civil Engineering must complete at least or 
(1) course of the group of Core Courses, six credit hours of advanced math courses (or equiv; 
lent math courses), and must enroll in the Master's Seminar (CIEN 792) every semester 
residence. 

Civil Engineering Core Courses 

CIEN 644 Finite Element Analysis 

CIEN 700 Emerging Technologies in Civil Engineering 

CIEN 702 Civil Engineering System Analysis 

CIEN 721 Advanced Soil Testing for Engineering Purposes 



96 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Fuhit 



Requirements of the Different Options 

,, All options require a minimum of thirty (30) credit hours and the formation of a formal 
graduate committee. The graduate committee will consist of the advisor and two additional 
faculty members selected in agreement between the advisor and the student. The plan of study 
should be prepared by the student and must be approved by the graduate committee. Specifi- 
cally, only the courses approved by the graduate committee can be used to satisfy the minimum 
^requirements set forth as "approved course work." At least half of the credit hours counted in 
}l iie "approved course work" to satisfy the requirements for a master's degree must be 700 level 
courses, that is, courses open only to graduate students. Furthermore, courses numbered 790 
,and above cannot be used to satisfy the "approved course work" requirements, with the only 
{exceptions as listed below: 



All Course Work Option: This option requires thirty (30) credit hours of "approved course 
work" plus a comprehensive examination that would be administered by the student's graduate 
;ommittee during the last semester in residence. 



Project Option: The project option requires twenty-seven (27) credit hours of "approved 
course work. This option is intended for students wishing to investigate a design problem of 
current interest to industry or to pursue a practical application. These students will have to 

demonstrate to the committee their capacity to perform and report work adequately. 

it 

H Thesis Option: This option requires twenty-four (24) credit hours of "approved course 
5 work" and six (6) credit hours of Master's Thesis (CIEN 797). The student's graduate commit- 
tee must formally examine the thesis content and quality, and judge the thesis defense. Further- 
more, thesis MUST follow the format required by the School of Graduate Studies. 



Grades Required 

I 

Grades for graduate students are recorded as follows: A, excellent; B, average; C, below 

average, but permissible; D, clearly below average and not acceptable; F, failure; S, satisfac- 
:ory; U, unsatisfactory (all courses CIEN 792 through CIEN 797 will be assigned S or U and 
will not be counted in the student's GPA); I, incomplete; W, withdrawal. The following aca- 
demic requirements are in effect: 

1. To earn a degree, a student must have a cumulative average of "B" (3.0 on the 4.0 
system). 

2. A graduate student is automatically placed on "warning" when his/her cumulative 
average falls below "B". The student has one semester to raise his/her average to "B" 
or above or be placed on Probation. Probationary status will remove a student's eligi- 
bility for a teaching assistantship. 

3. A student may be dropped from the degree program if he/she has not achieved a 
cumulative GPA of 3 .0 at the end of the probationary semester. 

4. A student may not repeat a required course in which "C" or above was earned. 

5. A student may repeat a required course in which "F" was earned. A student may not 
repeat the course more than once. If a student achieves less than "C" the second time, 
he/she is dismissed from the degree program. 

6. All hours attempted in graduate courses and all grade points earned are included in 
the computation of the cumulative average of a graduate student. 

7. A student who stops attending a course but fails to withdraw officially will be as- 
signed a grade of "F" 

8. All grades of "I" must be removed during the following semester within the pre- 
scribed time period. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 97 



9. Changing the selected option, for example from thesis to project, requires approval d 
the Graduate advisor and the Graduate Program Coordinator and may lead to loss qj 
credit for thesis or project credits. 

The graduate program must be completed within six (6) consecutive calendar years. Pre] 
grams remaining incomplete after this time interval are subject to cancellation, revision, d 
special examination for outdated work. In the event that studies are interrupted for duty in th 
armed services, the time limit shall be extended for the length of time the student shall hav; 
been on active duty providing the candidates resumes graduate work no later than one yet 
following release from military services. 



Course 
CIEN 600 
CIEN610 
CIEN 614 
CIEN 616 
CIEN 618 
CIEN 620 
CIEN 622 
CIEN 624 
CIEN 626 
CIEN 628 
CIEN 630 
CIEN 640 
CIEN 641 
CIEN 642 
CIEN 644 
CIEN 646 
CIEN 648 
CIEN 650 
CIEN 652 
CIEN 656 
CIEN 658 
CIEN 660 
CIEN 662 
CIEN 664 
CIEN 668 
CIEN 670 
CIEN 699 
CIEN 700 
CIEN 702 
CIEN 710 
CIEN 712 
CIEN 720 
CIEN 721 
CIEN 722 
CIEN 724 
CIEN 726 
CIEN 729 



98 



Advanced Undergraduate/Graduate Courses 

Title 

Expert Systems Applications in Civil Engineering 

Water and Waste/water Analysis 

Stream Water Quality Modeling 

Solid Waste Management 

Air Pollution Control 

Foundation Design I 

Soil Behavior 

Seepage and Earth Structures 

Soil and Site Improvement 

Applied Geotechnical Engineering Analysis and Design 

Advanced Construction Materials 

Advanced Structural Analysis 

Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures 

Design of Prestressed Concrete Structures 

Finite Element Analysis I 

Structural Design in Steel 

Structural Design in Wood 

Geometric Design in Highways 

Urban Transportation Planning 

Traffic Engineering 

Pavement Design 

Water Resources System Analysis 

Water Resources Engineering 

Open Channel Flow 

Subsurface Hydrology 

Construction Engineering and Management 

Special Projects 

Emerging Technologies in Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering Systems Analysis 

Hazardous Waste Management 

Systems Approach in Waste Management 

Theoretical Soil Mechanics 

Advanced Soil Testing for Engineering Purposes 

Design of Reinforced Earth Structures 

Constitutive Modeling for Geological Media 

Foundation Design II 

Geotechnical Aspects of Earthquake Engineering 



Ci 

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Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Futui 





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TIEN 730 Reinforced Concrete II 

1 ZIEN 73 1 Steel Structures II 

CIEN 732 Matrix Analysis of Structures 

ZIEN 733 Advanced Reinforced Concrete 

,-CIEN 734 Advanced Structural Steel 

jC3EN 735 Wind & Earthquake Design 

,ZIEN 736 Facility Planning and Site Analysis 

ZIEN 737 Computer- Aided Project Management 

^ ZIEN 738 Energy Management Planning 

ZIEN 739 Advanced Energy Conservation Systems 

ZIEN 740 Energy Maintenance and Management 

ZIEN 741 Professional Practice and Labor Relations 

ZIEN 752 Public Transportation Systems 

ZIEN 754 Modeling of Transportation Systems 

ZIEN 756 Highway Operations and Safety 

ZIEN 766 Design of Hydraulic Structures and Machinery 

ZIEN 785 Selected Topics 

ZIEN 786 Special Projects 

ZIEN 792 Civil Engineering Master's Seminar 

ZIEN 793 Master's Supervised Teaching 

ZIEN 794 Master's Supervised Research 

ZIEN 796 Master's Project 

ZIEN 797 Master's Thesis 

<\ 

CIVIL ENGINEERING COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

ii 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

iCIEN-600. Expert Systems Applications in Civil Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

Introductory overview of artificial intelligence with an emphasis on Civil Engineering applica- 
tions: What they are, how they are applied today, a discussion of when they should and should 
lot be used and what goes into building them. Emphasis is on: task selection criteria, knowl- 
edge acquisition and modeling, expert system architectures (control and representation issues), 
and testing and validation. Course requirements will include the design and development of a 
working system in a chosen application area. 

CIEN-610. Water and Waste/water Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

Laboratory and field methods for the measurements and analysis of water. 

CIEN-614. Stream Water Quality Modeling Credit 3 (3-0) 

'Mathematical modeling of water quality in receiving streams. Topics include: The generation 
of point and nonpoint sources of pollutants; the modeling and prediction of the reaction, trans- 
port and fate of pollutants in the stream; and the formulation and solution of simulation models. 

((Spring) 

|l 

(CIEN-616. Solid Waste Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

/This course is the study of collection, storage, transport and disposal of solid wastes . Examina- 
tion of various engineering alternatives with appropriate consideration for air and water pollution 

control and land reclamation are emphasized. (Fall) 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 99 



' 



CIEN-618. Air Pollution Control Credit 3 (3 

Introduction to air pollution and its control. Topics include: sources, types, and characteristi 
of air pollutants; air quality standards; and engineering alternatives for achieving various df 
grees of air pollution control. 

CIEN-620. Foundation Design I Credit 3 (3 

This course will introduce the following topics: behavior and design of retaining walls ai 
shallow foundations; earth pressure; bearing capacity and settlement; stress distribution ai 
consolidation theories; settlement of shallow foundations. 

CIEN-622. Soil Behavior Credit 3 (3 

This course will introduce the following topics: behavior of soil examined from a fundament 
perspective ; review of methods of testing to define response , rationale for choosing shear streng 
and deformation parameters for soils for design applications. 

CIEN-624. Seepage and Earth Structures Credit 3 (3-1 

This course will introduce the following topics: seepage through soils; permeability of soirj 
embankment design; compaction; earth pressures and pressures in embankments; slope stabii 
ity analysis; settlements horizontal movements in embankments; and landslide stabilization 1 



CIEN-626. Soil and Site Improvement Credit 3 (3-1 

This course will introduce the following topics: methods of soil and site improvement; desi^i 
techniques for dewatering systems; grouting; reinforced earth; in-situ densification; stone cq 
umns; slurry trenches; the use of geotextiles. Construction techniques for each system al 
described. 



CIEN-628. Applied Geotechnical Engineering Analysis and Design Credit 3 (3-1 

Introductory course in subsurface hydrology including: Principles of fluid (water) in saturate 
and unsaturated materials, well hydraulics, various methods of subsurface water flow sy stern, 

infiltration theory, and schemes for ground water basin management. 

t 

CIEN-630. Advanced Construction Materials Credit 3 (1-J 

This course covers Construction Materials advanced topics. It includes the chemistry, biologj 
physics, microstructure and macrostructure of many materials used in construction. Plastic] 
Portland cement concrete, asphalt cement and asphalt cement concrete, rubber, glazing, ml 
sonry, insulation materials, and wood are all covered in some detail. The relationship betwe<' 
materials and their appropriate use in service is stressed. There is substantial handson labor' 1 

tory work involved, including mixing and testing. 

. 

CIEN-640. Advanced Structural Analysis Credit 3 (3-i. 

This course is a continuation of CIEN-340 emphasizing the more complex concepts of stru; 
tural analysis for determinate and indeterminate structural systems using both hand calculation 
and computer applications. 

CIEN-641. Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures Credit 3 (3-1 

This course is a continuation of CIEN-540 emphasizing the more complex concepts of reii" 
forced concrete design. The design of continuous beams, two slabs and beams columns a 
addressed. 

CIEN-642. Design of Prestressed Concrete Structures Credit 3 (3-1 

This course uses the ACI and AASHTO codes to analyze and design prestressed concre; 
structures. 



100 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Futu 



fOEN-644. Finite Element Analysis I Credit 3 (3-0) 

{Analysis of continuous structural systems as assemblages of discrete elements. Applications of 
Ifiithe finite element method is made to the general field of continuum mechanics. Convergence 
! properties and numerical techniques are discussed. 

i;CIEN-646. Structural Design in Steel Credit 3 (3-0) 

liiThis course uses the AISC code to analyze and design steel structures. 

CIEN-648. Structural Design in Wood Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course uses the wood product code to analyze and design wood structures. 

H 

jCIEN-650. Geometric Design of Highways Credit 3 (3-0) 

t ,This course deals with the development and application of geometric design concepts for rural 

'systems. Topics include: functional classifications, design controls and criteria, elements of 

design, cross section elements, and intersection design. 

it 

j CIEN-652. Urban Transportation Planning Credit 3 (3-0) 

j^This course introduces urban transport planning using a decision-oriented approach. Discus- 

jsions focus on the decision-making process, data requirements, evaluation processes, systems 

performance analysis and program implementation. 

it 

■ CIEN-656. Traffic Engineering Credit 3 (2-2) 

L Theory and practice of the operation aspects of Transportation Engineering. Specific applica- 

I tions will deal with the operation, design, and control of highways and their networks. Topics 

include: data collection techniques, traffic flow theory, and various highway capacity methods 

and their theoretical basis and the various application software available for each topic. 

( 

^CIEN-658. Pavement Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

: Application of multilayer theories for design of highways and airport pavement structures. 
Flexible and rigid pavement design methods are covered with discussions focusing on their 
theoretical basis and their major differences. Topics include: cost analysis and pavement selec- 
tion, drainage, earthwork, pavement evaluation, and maintenance. 

jllEN-660. Water Resources System Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

Mathematical modeling techniques. Formulation of mathematical representations of complex 
.water resources systems and their evaluation via linear programming, dynamic programming, 
)( non-linear programming, and by the use of formal heuristics. Models for optimal sewer design, 
optimal sequencing (or capacity expansion) of projects, reservoir systems planning and man- 
agement are presented. 

; .( 

jCIEN-662. Water Resource Engineering Credit 3 (2-2) 

f This course involves the application of hydrologic and hydraulic principles in the analysis and 
design of water resources systems. The measurement of ground water parameters and general 
water quality parameters is covered. Topics covered include; water supply and distribution, 

(■'reservoirs, water resources system economics, water law, hydroelectric power, flood control, 

bwater resources planning and development and drainage. 

CIEN-664. Open Channel Flow Credit 3 (3-0) 

Advanced topics in open channel flow, design of open channels for uniform and nonuniform 

kflow, wave interference, roughness effects, flow over spillways, water surface profiles, and 

energy dissipation methods. Some computational methods in open channel flow are presented. 






i Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 101 



CIEN-668. Subsurface Hydrology Credit 3 (3-< 

Introductory course in subsurface hydrology including: principles of fluid (water) in saturate 
and unsaturated materials, well hydraulics, various methods of subsurface water flow system! 
infiltration theory, and schemes for ground-water basin management. 

CIEN-670. Construction Engineering and Management Credit 3 (3-i 

This course concentrates on the solution to problems in Construction Engineering and Mai 
agement. A variety of problems from the construction industry are presented to the student 
The students form teams to develop solutions to these problems. Topics vary with availab 
projects and student interest. Graduate students select a project in their area of interest ft 
intensive study and a report. 

CIEN-699. Special Projects Credit 3 (3-( 

Study arranged on a special civil engineering topic of interest to the student and faculty. Topi 
may be analytical and/or experimental with independent study encouraged. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 



CIEN-700. Emerging Technologies in Civil Engineering Credit 3 (3 

Provides an overview of the applications of emerging technologies (such as decision suppo 
systems and Geographic Information Systems) in civil engineering. The students are require! 
to complete a project which includes the design and implementation of one of the types & 
systems covered in the course. 

CIEN-702. Civil Engineering Systems Analysis Credit 3 (3-t; 

Introduces mathematical modeling techniques for the solution of civil engineering problem,; 
These include the formulation of mathematical representation of complete civil engineeriri 
systems and their evaluation via linear programming, dynamic programming, non-linear pre 
gramming and the use of formal heuristics. Multiobjective analysis, project management ar, 
civil engineering planning and design are also presented. 

1 
CIEN-710. Hazardous Waste Management Credit 3 (3-d 

Presents a study of the characteristics, treatment, and disposal of hazardous wastes. The topk 

include the: the generation and characteristics of hazardous waste, hazardous waste regul; 

tions, transport and fate of hazardous waste in the environment and treatment and disposi 

methods. (Fall) 

CIEN-712. Systems Approach in Waste Management Credit 3 (3-( 

Introduces the application of systems analysis methods to the design, analysis and managt 
ment of environmental systems. The topics include: characteristics of a system, problen 
amenable to systems analysis, optimization models, solution techniques, and case studies n 
solid waste management, hazardous waste management, and water quality management. (Spring 

CIEN-720. Theoretical Soil Mechanics Credit 3 (3-( 

Presents the different theories of consolidation, such as Terzaghi's Theory, layered system;; 
sand drains, approximate three-dimensional theories, and Biot's poroelestic formulation. TH 
course will also present theories of elastic and plastic equilibrium in soils including applied 
tions to earth pressure, bearing, bearing capacity, and slope stability problems. 

CIEN-721. Advanced Soil Testing for Engineering Purposes Credit 3 (1-d 

This course allows students to gain laboratory experience with the methods of testing soils fd 
engineering properties such as compressibility, strength (in triaxial, simple shear, and direi 
shear), permeability, and stability. 

i 

102 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Futui 

T 



e CIEN-722. Design of Reinforced Earth Structures Credit 3 (3-0) 

-[-Introduces the student to the interaction mechanisms of soil with reinforcement elements. The 
applications covered will include the following: reinforced earth, soil nailing, and geotextile/ 
geofabric strengthening of pavement structures. 
M 

bCIEN-724. Constitutive Modeling for Geological Media Credit 3 (3-0) 

ti Introduces the following topics: constitutive models for geological media including piecewise 
ir linear; Mohr-Coulomb: Hvorslev's and Roscoe's concepts; role in modeling of in-situ stress; 
^sequential construction and stress paths; lateral pressure coefficients; dilatation and softening; 
arching; pore water pressure; joints and interfaces; and Darcy and non Darcy Laws. 

^ CIEN-726. Foundation Design II Credit 3 (3-0) 

j Introduces the analysis and design of foundations and other substructures including the follow- 
ing: concrete footings with reinforcement; pile foundations; retaining walls; pavements, load 
transfer in rail track beds; cofferdams; caissons and underground structures and openings. 

CIEN-729. Geotechnical Aspects of Earthquake Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

Introduces the student to the following earthquake related topics: response of soils to seismic 
loading; liquefaction phenomena and analysis of pore pressure development; laboratory test- 
ing for seismic: including direct laboratory experience. The course will also provide instruction 
on the analysis and design of slopes, embankments, foundations, and earth retaining structures 
for seismic loading conditions. 

j CIEN-730. Reinforced Concrete II Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a continuation of CIEN 636 emphasizing the more complex concepts of rein- 

"forced concrete theory and their application to design. The analysis and design of special concrete 
structures will be addressed. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and CIEN 636 or consent of the 

instructor. 

ti 

CIEN-731. Structural Steel II Credit 3 (3-0) 

j The design of composite structures, built-up beams, portal frames, and gabled frames are pre- 
sented. Also addressed are the concepts of limit and plastic design. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing and CIEN 635 or consent of the instructor. 

i CIEN-732. Matrix Analysis of Structures Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course reviews Matrix algebra; statically and kinematically indeterminate structures. The 
student is introduced to the flexibility and stiffness methods as it applies to beams, plane trusses 
and plane frames. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and CIEN 630 or consent of the instructor. 

r CIEN-733. Advanced Reinforced Concrete Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a continuation of CIEN 726 emphasizing the design of reinforced concrete struc- 
tures. The analysis and design of reinforced concrete structures will be addressed. Prerequisite: 
, Graduate standing and CIEN 726 or consent of the instructor. 

iCIEN-734. Advanced Structural Steel Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a continuation of CIEN727 emphasizing the design of steel building structures. 
tThe analysis and design of steel structures will be addressed. Prerequisites: Graduate standing 
and CIEN 727 or consent of the instructor. 

^CIEN-735. Wind and Earthquake Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

• The course applies the principles of structural dynamics to determine the response of buildings 
-to earthquake and wind induced forces. The response spectra is used to evaluate earthquake 
forces on the building. The behavior of wind and the variation in wind velocity are studied with 
respect to topography and the building height above ground. The course also investigates the 

Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 103 



response of building components to hurricanes and tornadoes. Prerequisites: Graduate stand- 
ing and CIEN 603. 

CIEN-736. Facility Planning and Site Analysis. Credit 3 (3-0) 

The course includes strategic and long-range planning concepts, environmental impact studies, 
population and growth projections. Accessibility, storm water retention, and economics are 
also discussed. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor. 

CIEN-737. Computer-Aided Project Management. Credit 3 (0-6) 

This course uses computer-aided analysis and design in project scheduling, manpower fore- 
casting, cash flow analysis, progress reports, billings and profitability analysis. The emphasis 
is on the application of micro-computers in the management of a small consulting firm. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor. 

CIEN-738. Energy Management Planning Credit 3 (3-0) 

The course presents concepts of energy management planning for multi-building complexes 
such as universities, hospitals, and schools. Topics include data collection and analysis, facility 
audits, on-site metering, and the review of maintenance records and utility bills. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing and consent of the instructor. 

CIEN-739. Advanced Energy Conservation Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

The course includes advanced topics in energy conservation including thermal storage, district 
heating and cooling, waste heat recovery, and co-generation. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
and consent of the instructor. 

CIEN-740. Energy & Maintenance Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

The course deals with computerized energy accounting methodologies and computerized main- 
tenance management methodologies. The students will apply computer programs to an actual 
building in order to obtain real- world experience in program application. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing and consent of the instructor. 

CIEN-741. Professional Practice and Labor Relations Credit 3 (3-0) 

The course deals with the legal aspects of engineering consulting and commercial construc- 
tion. Topics include contracts, employment standards, collective bargaining, resolving labor 
disputes and the Occupational Safety & Health regulations. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
and consent of the instructor. 

CIEN-752. Public Transportation Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

Exposes the student to the technologies, design, operation, planning, evaluation, management 
and implementation of public transportation systems. The following systems are considered: 
rail, fixed-route, fixed-schedule bus, and demand responsive services. The topics include the ' 
following: financing and regulation, supply and demand relationships, performance evalua- 
tion, routing and scheduling, and microcomputer applications. 

CIEN-754. Modeling of Transportation Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is concerned with the development and use of system models associated with trans- ' 
portation decision making. The modeling techniques that will be used are the following: multiple 
linear regressions, choice theory and network simulation. The application areas considered are 
the following: traffic flow theory, planning models, urban transit planning and operations, and 
the evaluation alternatives. 

CIEN -756. Highway Operations and Safety Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will present a discussion of the policies, laws and programs relating to highway 
safety in the United States. The topics of discussion presented include a historical overview of 

104 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



highway safety, the government's role (at all levels), a description and status of current safety 
programs, the analytical techniques used by the traffic safety engineer (practical problems, 
data requirements, limitations), and some of the moral/ethical issues of concern to the Safety 
1 Engineer. 

j CIEN-766. Design of Hydraulic Structures and Machinery Credit 3 (3-0) 

Presents the analysis and design of water regulating structures including dams, spillways, out- 
let works, transition structures, conduit systems and gates. The course will also present the 
1 applications of basic principles of fluid mechanics and hydraulics to the design and selection of 
pumps, turbine, and other hydraulic machinery. 

' CIEN-785. Selected Topics Credit 1 (1-0), 2 (2-0), 3 (3-0) 

Allows a student to select a civil engineering topic of interest to the student to investigate in 
depth. The topic will be selected by the student and a faculty advisor before the beginning of 

1 the semester. The topic must be pertinent to the study program of the student and must be 

i approved by the faculty advisor. 

CIEN-786. Special Projects Credit 1 (1-0), 2 (2-0), 3 (3-0) 

Student must select a project on a special civil engineering topic of interest to the student and 
a faculty member, who will act as an advisor. The student and faculty advisor must agree upon 
the project and scope of work before the beginning of the semester. The project may be analyti- 
cal and/or experimental and encourage independent work. The topic must be pertinent to the 
program in which the student is enrolled and approved by the faculty advisor. (Fall, Spring) 

; CIEN-792. Civil Engineering Master's Seminar p Credit 1 (1-0) 

Discussion and presentations of reports of subjects in Civil Engineering and allied fields are 
included. 

CIEN-793. Master's Supervised Teaching Credit 3 (3-0) 

Students will gain teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student 
in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during 
the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment. 

CIEN-794. Master's Supervised Research Credit 3 (3-0) 

Students will receive instruction in how to plan, organize and perform research. Research will 
be performed under the mentorship of a member of the graduate faculty. 

CIEN-796. Master's Project Credit 3 (3-0) 

The student will conduct advanced research of interest to the student and the instructor. A 
written proposal, which outlines the nature of the project, must be submitted for approval. This 
course is only available to project option students. 

CIEN-797. Master's Thesis Credit 3 (3-0) 

Master of Science thesis research will be conducted under the supervision of the thesis com- 
mittee chairperson leading to the completion of the Master's Thesis. This course is only available 
to thesis option students. 

CIEN-999. Continuation of Master's Thesis Credit 1 (1-1) 

This is a continuation course for Master's Thesis. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 105 



Computational Science and Engineering M.S. Program 

, — 

Ajit D. Kelkar, Interim Director 

317 IRC Building 

(336) 334-7620 

kelkar@ncat.edu 

www.eng.ncat.edu/idp/cse 

OBJECTIVES 

The program is designed with the following objectives: 

1 . To educate graduate students with a mastery of high performance computer programming 
tools as well as processing, data acquisition, and analysis techniques. 

2. To educate and train students in computational modeling, simulation and visualization. I 

3. To assist students to relate acquired computational science and engineering knowledg 
and skills to specific application fields of engineering, science, technology and business 

4. To teach students to develop novel and robust computational methods and tools to solv ! 
scientific, engineering, and technological and business problems. 

5 . To produce highly versatile computational scientists , engineers , technologists , or busines 
executives with a good understanding of the connections among various disciplines, ca 
pable of interacting and collaborating effectively with scientists, engineers, and profes 
sionals in other fields. 

6. To increase the number of graduate professionals available to work in computational sci 
ence and engineering. 

7. To increase the diversity of graduate professionals, especially underrepresented minorit; 
and African Americans available to work in the computational science and engineering 
field. 

8. To assist the State of North Carolina and the nation to increase the pool of graduates witj 
training and experience in computational science and engineering, interdisciplinary applii 
cations and research. 

GENERAL PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Candidates seeking admission to the CSE Program for the Master of Science degree mus 
meet the following requirements: 

1 . Computational Science and Engineering track: Bachelor's degree in engineering, physics' 
computer science, or mathematics from an accredited program with a minimum cumula 
tiveGPA of 3.0/4.0. 

2. Computational Science track: Bachelor's degree in Chemistry, Biology, Business anc 1 
Agricultural Sciences with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0/4/0. 

3. Computational Technology track: Bachelor's degree in Technology or related field with ;' 
minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0/4.0. 

4. A completed Graduate Record Exam (GRE) General Test as applicable to the discipline 
area of the student. 

5. Official TOEFL scores of at least 550 or better (213 computer-based score) for student: 
whose native language is other than English. Scores should be submitted directly to the 1 
School of Graduate Studies. 

6. General prerequisites: (1) Calculus through differential equations for the computationa 
science and engineering track, (2) college chemistry and physics, (3) elementary numeri 
cal analysis, (4) one semester of linear algebra for the computational science and engi 



106 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



neering track. These are in addition to the courses in the student's principal bachelor de- 
gree discipline. Programming and working knowledge of at least one high level program- 
ming language such as FORTRAN, C++, or Java is also required for the computational 
science and engineering track, and recommended for other tracks depending on the student's 
area of interest. There may also be additional recommended or required prerequisites spe- 
cific to the needs of a focus area. 

Documentation Requirements 

The following documents are to be submitted by all applicants. 

1. Two official transcripts of all college-level academic work. 

2. Three letters of recommendation (for study at the graduate level) from professional asso- 
ciates or supervising faculty /professors from the degree granting institution. 

3. An official copy of the GRE scores mailed directly to the University from the testing 
agency. 

4. An official copy of the TOEFL score, if applicable, mailed directly to the University from 
the testing agency. 

5. The completed application form and application fee stipulated by the School of Graduate 
Studies at NC A&T State University. 

6. A "Statement of Purpose" in the context of pursuing the M.S. degree in Computational 
Science and Engineering. 






Computational Science and Engineering Tracks 



. Computational Science and Engineering 

This track is designed primarily for students with undergraduate degrees in engineering, 
physics, mathematics, and computer science who will be trained to develop problem-solving 
methodologies and computational tools as well as interdisciplinary technical expertise in CSE 
for solving challenging problems in physical science, engineering, applied mathematics or com- 
puter science. This includes domains that are both in the College of Engineering, and the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences. The curriculum will emphasize computational sciences and 
engineering along with training in the domain areas . The goal of this track is to produce scien- 
tists and engineers with focus, training and application in computational sciences, scalable 
computing, physics-based modeling and simulations, and with expertise in the application of 
computational techniques and principles in their primary domain areas. Qualified undergradu- 
ate students can be admitted to this stream if they also meet the admission criteria of their 
major domain field. Based on their undergraduate degrees, the students in this track would be 
required to have had an increased level of prior training, courses and exposure to mathematics, 
including areas such as numerical analysis, and high level programming languages. Students 
with undergraduate degrees in other science and technology areas may also be admitted, if they 
meet the admission and course requirements, including prerequisites of the domain depart- 
ment. The areas of specialization will include, but will not be limited to, computational quan- 
tum chemistry, computational nuclear and high energy physics, computational solid or fluid 
dynamics, computational material science, bioengineering, engineering design and automa- 
tion, applied and environmental geophysics, computational seismology, nonlinear computa- 
tional mechanics, super fast algorithms for numerical and algebraic computation, and distributed 
and high performance computing. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 107 



Computational Sciences 

This track is designed primarily for students with undergraduate degrees in chemistry 
biology, business, and agricultural sciences who will be trained to apply or extend computaj: 
tional tools and methods as well as data acquisition, processing and visualization techniques tcl 
study computationally intensive problems in life sciences, agricultural and environmental sci' 
ences, and business and economics. This track primarily includes domain areas with lesser 
training in mathematics including numerical analysis, and programming languages and fo: 
cuses on domains with non-deterministic models. The domains in this track are for the College; 
of Arts and Sciences, the School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences and the School o : 'i 
Business and Economics. The goal of this track is to produce biological and life scientists 
business professionals and economists, and agricultural scientists with focus and expertise ir 
computational sciences and the primary domain areas. Qualified undergraduate students can be 
admitted to this stream if they also meet the admission criteria of the major domain area. Basec 
on their undergraduate field, the students in this track would be required to take additional 
mathematics and programming focused courses. Students with undergraduate degrees in othe^f 
science, engineering and technology areas may also be admitted if they meet the admission anc 1 
course requirements, including prerequisites for the domain department. The areas of special 
ization will include, but will not be limited to, bioinformatics, computational genomics, com 
putational physical chemistry, computational biochemistry, and computational finance. 

Computational Technology 

I 

This track is designed primarily for students with undergraduate degrees in technology 

disciplines with a focus on computational science and engineering. These technology disci- 
plines currently include computation technology, computer numerical control machining, re-| 
mote sensing, GIS/GPS data analysis, and nanotechnology with additional potential disciplines 
in the future. The goal of this track is to produce technologists with a focus and training ir 
computational sciences, and in their primary technology domain area. Students with under- 
graduate degrees in engineering, mathematics, physics and computer science may also be ad 
mitted and must meet the course and curriculum requirements in technology. 

PROGRAM OPTIONS AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

The program requires 34 credit hours at the graduate level beyond the undergraduate degree 
distributed as follows: 

Thesis Option: 

27 credit hours for course work at the graduate level, 
1 credit hour for seminars, and 
6 credit hours for thesis research. 

Project Option: 

30 credit hours for course work at the graduate level, 

1 credit hour for seminars, and 

3 credit hours for graduate masters project. 



108 



Year One 

Fall Semester 

CSE 701- Applied Probability and Statistics 3cr 

CSE 702 - Comprehensive Numerical Analysis 3cr 

Domain course I 3cr 

Spring Semester 

■ CSE 703 - Data Structures, Software Principles and 

Programming in Scalable Parallel Computing. 3cr 

CSE 704 - Computational Modeling and Visualization 3cr 

Domain course II 3cr 

Year Two 



Fall Semester 



Interdisciplinary course I 3cr 

Interdisciplinary course II 3cr 

Interdisciplinary course III 3cr (for project option) 

Thesis 3cr (for thesis option) 

Seminar lcr 



Spring Semester 



Domain course III 3cr 

Thesis 3cr (for thesis option) 

Master's Project 3cr (for project option) 

All students irrespective of the track that they are registered in must complete the core 

courses CSE-70 1 , CSE-702 , CSE-703 and CSE-704 . 

All students must complete the Graduate Seminar course CSE 792, which accounts for 

1 credit hour 

Students pursuing the thesis option must complete 6 credits hours of CSE 797. 

Students pursuing the project option must complete 3 credits hours of CSE 796. 

A list of Domain courses and Interdisciplinary courses from which a student can choose 

based on the track the student is registered in is as follows: 

Computational Science and Engineering Track 

Domain Courses: 

Mechanical: MEEN 618, MEEN 655, MEEN 716, MEEN 719 

Civil: CIEN 614, CIEN 668, CIEN 644, CIEN 660, CIEN 662, CIEN 664, CIEN 700, CIEN 
702, CIEN 754 

Industrial: INEN 665, INEN 721, INEN 742, INEN 813, INEN 814, INEN 822, INEN 841 , 
INEN 843, INEN 844, INEN 853 

Computer Science: COMP 670, COMP 732, COMP 733, COMP 755, COMP 770, COMP 785 

Electrical: ELEN 674, ELEN 678, ELEN 749, ELEN 762, ELEN 764, ELEN 821 , ELEN 857, 
ELEN 862, ELEN 865, ELEN 867, ELEN 870, ELEN 871 

Chemical: CHEN 630, CHEN 620, CHEN 640, CHEN 710, CHEN 720, CHEN 730, CHEN 
740, CHEN 760 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 109 



Physics: PHYS 735, PHYS 605, PHYS, 737, PHYS 738, PHYS 739, PHYS 743, PHYS 751 
Math: MATH 608, MATH 624, MATH 652, MATH 706, MATH 712, MATH 723 

Interdisciplinary Elective Courses: 

PHYS 745, PHYS 746, BIOL 705, BIOL 706, MEEN 655, MEEN 716, PHYS 791, MATI-j 
79 1 , CSE 711, CSE 712, CSE 7 1 3 or any other qualifying domain courses that are not from th< 
major domain area of the student. Students registered for the thesis option must complete ( 
credit hours of course work from this list and students registered for the project option musi 
complete 9 credit hours of course work from this list. 

Computational Science Track 

Domain Courses: 

Chemistry: CHEM 65 1 , CHEM 652, CHEM 643, CHEM 772, CHEM 741 , CHEM 742, CHEN! 
745, CHEM 746, CHEM 755, CHEM 756 

Agribusiness and Science: AGEC 638, AGEC 675, AGEC 705, AGEC 708, AGEC 740, AGEC 
756 

Animal Sciences: ANSC 637, ANSC 665, ANSC 771, ANSC 782 

Human Environment and Family Sciences: HEFS 653 

Natural Resources and Environmental Design: SLSC 632, NARS 610, AGRI 604 

Biology: BIOL 632, BIOL 642, BIOL 665, BIOL 700, BIOL 703, BIOL 704 

Business and Economics : BU AD 715, BU AD 713, BUAD 712, ECON 706, ACCT 708 ACC 
714, BUAD 730, BUAD 731, BUAD 732, BUAD 733, BUAD 734, BUAD 735, BUAD 736 
TRAN 701 , TRAN 720, TRAN 725, TRAN 727, TRAN 730 

Interdisciplinary Elective Courses: 

PHYS 745, PHYS 746, BIOL 705, BIOL 706, MEEN 655, MEEN 716, PHYS 791, MAT! 
791,CSE711,CSE712,CSE713or any other qualifying domain courses that are not from th 
major domain area of the student. Students registered for the thesis option must complete | 
credit hours of course work from this list and students registered for the project option mus; 
complete 9 credit hours of course work from this list. 

Computational Technology 

Domain Courses: 

] 
Electronics and Computer Technology and Manufacturing Systems: ECT 600, ITT 634 

ECT 635 , ITT 650, ITT 665, ITT 670, ITT 680, ECT 765 , ECT 770, MFG 65 1 , MFG 674, MFC 

710, MFG 760, CSE 711, CSE 712 

Interdisciplinary Elective Courses: 

PHYS 745, PHYS 746, BIOL 705, BIOL 706, MEEN 655, MEEN 716, PHYS 791, MATh 
791 , CSE 71 1 , CSE 712, CSE 713 or any other qualifying domain courses that are not from th 
major domain area of the student. Students registered for the thesis option must complete j 
credit hours of course work from this list and students registered for the project option mus 
complete 9 credit hours of course work from this list. 



1 10 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Futw 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE AND PLAN OF GRADUATE WORK 

I 

Initially the Director of the program will serve as the academic advisor for all new stu- 
dents entering the program. Each student in the M.S. program is expected to select a major 
advisor by the beginning of the second semester with the approval of the Director. The major 

ir advisor must hold a tenure or tenure-track full-time faculty position at the university. However, 

y a co-advisor may have non-tenure-track/adjunct status. 

I The M.S. Advisory Committee will consist of a minimum of three (3) graduate faculty 

. members with the major advisor as its chairperson. Committee members must be from at least 
two different departments. Members could represent more than one campus School/College. 
The M.S. Advisory Committee will be recommended by the major advisor with input from the 

istudent to the Director of the CSE program for approval by the Dean of Graduate Studies. 

OTHER INFORMATION 

j See "Requirements for the Master of Science Degree" elsewhere in this catalog for infor- 
mation related to residence requirements, qualifying examination, preliminary examination, 
final oral examination, admission to candidacy, and time limit. Additional details of require- 
ments for the program are outlined in the Computational Science and Engineering M.S. Pro- 
gram Student Handbook available from the Graduate School. 

List of Courses Credits 

CSE 701 Applied Probability and Statistics 3 

CSE 702 Comprehensive Numerical Analysis 3 

CSE 703 Data Structures, Software Principles and Programming in 

Scalable Parallel Computing 3 

CSE 704 Computational Modeling and Visualization 3 

CSE 711 Nano-Scale Science and Engineering 3 

CSE 712 Nano-Scale Technology 3 

CSE 7 1 3 Multi-Scale and Multi-Physics Modeling 3 

i M.S. Level Pass/Fail Courses 

CSE 792 Graduate Seminar 1 

■ CSE 796 Masters Project 3 
CSE 797 Masters Thesis 3 
CSE 799 Continuation of Masters Thesis 1 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

CSE 701. Applied Probability and Statistics Credit 3 (3-0) 

■ This course addresses probability and statistics theory and techniques with common applica- 
tion in computational science and engineering. Topics include parameter and distribution 
estimation, random variables and computer generation, hypothesis testing and confidence in- 
tervals, regression analysis, and the design of experiments including analysis of variance. 

CSE 702. Comprehensive Numerical Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

i This course provides a comprehensive treatment to numerical methods for the solution of equa- 
tion systems both in deterministic and non-deterministic problems. Both numerical solution 
techniques for differential equations, linear systems, data analysis, optimization, regression, 
Monte Carlo methods, forecast models, etc. will be covered. 






Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 111 



CSE 703. Data Structures, Software Principles and Programming in 

Scalable Parallel Computing Credit 3 (3-0 

This course addresses the concepts, principles hardware and software, communication anc 
computational strategies for scalable, parallel computing systems, the associated computer dat; 
structures, programming languages and parallel programming paradigms and associated com 
munications for parallel and scalable computing applications in engineering, sciences, ano 
technology. 

CSE 704. Computational Modeling and Visualization Credit 3 (3-0 

This course covers computational techniques for solving deterministic physical models in en 
gineering and sciences, as well as computational techniques for non-deterministic models ii 
business, economics, informatics, statistics, etc. It also involves a detailed study of visualiza 
tion, analysis and interpretation techniques useful in the analysis of numerical data in botl 
deterministic and non-deterministic disciplines, as well as visualization and interpretation soft; 
ware tools. 

CSE 711. Nano-Scale Science and Engineering Credit 3 (3-0 

This course explores the fundamental understanding and resulting technological advances arisj 
ing from the exploitation of new physical, chemical, and biological properties of systems tha| 
are intermediate in size between isolated atoms and molecules and bulk materials. 

CSE 712. Nano-Scale Technology Credit 3 (3-0 

This course explores the creation and utilization of functional materials, devices, and system 
with novel properties and functions that are achieved through the control of matter, atom-by 
atom, molecule-by-molecule, or at the macro-molecular level. Nano-scale manufacturing an< 
fabrication requires an entirely new approach: invention of new instruments, measuring tools 1 
models, methods, and standards to characterize nano-scale materials and processes. 

CSE 713. Multi-Scale and Multi-Physics Modeling Credit 3 (3-0, 

This course focuses on multi-scale, multi-physics modeling approaches, associated computa 
tional techniques involving quantum, atomistic, meso, micro, macro models and the coupling 
of such models and related applications in engineering, materials and physical sciences. 

CSE 792. Graduate Seminar Credit 1 (1-OJ 

Discussions and reports of subjects in Computational Science and Engineering and allied field 
will be presented. Prerequisite: Masters level standing. 

CSE 796. Masters Project Credit 3 (3-0 

The student will conduct advanced research of interest to the student and the instructor. A 
written proposal, which outlines the nature of the project, must be submitted for approval. Thii; 
course is only available to project option students. Prerequisite: Masters level standing. 

CSE 797. Masters Thesis Credit 3 (3-0 

Master of Science thesis research will be conducted under the supervision of the thesis com t ; 
mittee chairperson leading to the completion of the Masters thesis. This course is availabl 
only to thesis option students and can be repeated. Prerequisite: Consent of advisor. 

CSE 799. Continuation of Masters Thesis Credit 1 (1-d 

This course is a continuation of CSE 797. The course is for master's students who have com 
pleted all required credit hour requirements. Prerequisite: Completion of all Thesis/Dissertatio 
Credits. 



112 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Futur 



Computer Science 



I Kenneth A. Williams, Chairperson 

i; Huiming (Anna) Yu, Director of Graduate Studies 

i: 508 McNair Hall 

c; (336) 334-7245 

OBJECTIVES 

P 

L The Master of Science Program in Computer Science is designed to meet the need for 

i technical and managerial specialists in research, academia and industry. 

I DEGREE OFFERED 

f Computer Science - Master of Science 

The MSCS program provides three methods for earning the degree: Thesis (30 credits), 
l Project (33 credits) or course only (33 credits). Unconditional admission to the program is 
granted to students with a BS in computer science from an accredited program with a minimum 
GPA of 3.0. Admission may be awarded to promising students from other majors after com- 
pleting specified undergraduate prerequisites. Specific degree and admission requirements are 
detailed in the Computer Science Department Graduate Student Handbook. 
\i It is assumed that all entering students have completed undergraduate courses in program- 
ij ming in an qbject-oriented language (such as C++, Java or Smalltalk), in data structures, algo- 
rithm analysis, operating systems and computer architecture. It is also assumed that they are 
]i mathematically mature (for example, calculus, discrete math or switching theory). Students 
{who have not had such courses or their equivalent may be required to take undergraduate 
courses to remedy deficiencies, with no credit towards the degree. 

Master's Program General Description 

: The research interests of the faculty cover many areas of Computer Science including 
software engineering, information assurance, artificial intelligence, computational science, dis- 
tributed systems, multiagent systems, computer security, visualization, multimedia input and 
high performance computing. 

I 
Software Engineering: 

The systematic approach to the development, operation, maintenance, and retirement of 
I software is the definition of software engineering. Software is not only the program code, but 
includes the various documents needed for the development, installation, utilization, and main- 
tenance of a system. Engineering refers to the application of a systems approach to the produc- 
tion of large software systems. Methodologies for analysis and design are evolving, competing, 
and themselves being automated through the use of CASE (computer aided software engineer- 
ing) tools. The methods of software engineering seek to produce systems of high quality, on 
time, at the lowest costs possible. Research projects include object oriented methodologies, 
software production cost modeling, software reliability engineering, and the social implica- 
tions of computer technology. 

Artificial Intelligence: 

Artificial intelligence uses symbolic computation and complex interrelations of variables 
to produce "intelligent" responses to problem situations. The responses are intelligent in the 
sense that unforeseen situations are accommodated and decisions are not hard-coded into pro- 
grams. Problems are frequently "ill-structured", that is, they cannot be stated in the forms 
required by commonly used deterministic and sequential algorithms. Artificial intelligence of- 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 113 



ten involves search and inference and frequently supports human decision making. It is thus 
natural to view artificial intelligence software as tackling problems as humans would tackle 
them. Research topics include mobile robots, computer vision, automated reasoning, the acqui 
sition and representation of knowledge, and the analysis of decision making in realistic busi 
ness settings. Artificial intelligence uses a multitude of paradigms, willingly collaborates with 
other areas of computer science, and pursues real-world applications. 

Computational Science and Engineering: 

Computational science is a relatively new branch of science and has emerged as a power 
ful and indispensable method of analyzing a variety of problems in research, production and 
process development, and manufacturing. Computational modeling and simulation is being 
accepted as a methodology in scientific research, complementing the traditional approaches of 
theory and experiment. Computational modeling, simulation, and visualization are immensely 
useful for studying things that are otherwise too big, too small, too expensive, too scarce, or too 
inaccessible to study. The rapid growth of information technology and its applications in the 
job market created a need for multi-skilled workers at all levels, including the master's. 

General: 

There are several other research areas in the Department of Computer Science. Students 
can select a research topic from these areas as the project/thesis. Students must consult their 
advisor to design their curriculum and project/thesis. 

LIST OF GRADUATE COURSES 

COMP 620 Information, Privacy, and Security 

COMP 627 Wireless Network Security 

COMP 645 Artificial Intelligence ** 

COMP 653 Computer Graphics 

COMP 662 Computer Aided Instruction 

COMP 663 Compiler Construction 

COMP 670 Advanced Computer Architecture 

COMP 68 1 Formal Methods # 

COMP 700 Independent Study 

COMP 710 Software Specification , Analysis and Design * * * , # 

COMP 711 Software System Design, Implementation, Verification and Validation * 

COMP 712 Software Project Management *** 

COMP 713 Social Impacts of Software Systems 

COMP 714 Case, Automated Development, and Information Engineering 

COMP 715 Decision Support Systems 

COMP 716 Object-Oriented Programming and Software Reuse 

COMP 7 1 7 Software Fault Tolerance 

COMP 7 1 8 Object Oriented Software Engineering 

COMP 723 Intrusion Detection 

COMP 732 Advanced Software Tools t 

COMP 733 Parallel Computing Applications 

COMP 740 Advanced Artificial Intelligence ** 

COMP 741 Knowledge Representation and Acquisition 

COMP 742 Automated Reasoning 

COMP 745 Computational Linguistics 



114 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



M 
COMP 747 Computer Vision Methodologies 

COMP 749 Intelligent Robots 

COMP 750 Distributed Systems 

COMP 753 Performance Modeling and Evaluation 

COMP 755 Advanced Operating Systems * 

COMP 767 Computer Network Architecture 

COMP 770 Computer Organization and Programming for Scientific Computing f 

lj COMP 780 Semantics of Programming Languages 

C COMP 785 Advanced Design and Analysis of Algorithms * 

1 COMP 786 Multiagent Systems 

/COMP 790 Special Topics in Computer Science 

COMP 792 Computer Science Masters Seminar 
5 COMP 793 Masters Supervised Teaching 

COMP 796 Masters Project 

COMP 797 Masters Thesis 

t COMP 999 Continuation Research 

1 * = Core course, required of all students 

** = Required for Artificial Intelligence specialization 
*** = Required for Software Engineering specialization 
t = Required for Computational Science and Engineering specialization 
'# = Required for General specialization 






COURSES WITH DESCRIPTION IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 
Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 



COMP-620. Information, Privacy and Security Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course examines the security and privacy issues associated with information systems. 

! There are cost/risk tradeoffs to be made. Discussed are topics such as technical, physical, and 
administrative methods of providing security, access control, identification, and authentica- 
tion. Encryption is examined, including Data Encryption Standards (DES) and public key 
cryptosy stems. Management considerations such as key protection and distribution, orange 
book requirements, and OSI data security standards are covered. Privacy legislation is covered, 

i as is current cryptographic research. 

COMP-627. Wireless Network Security Credit 3 (3-0) 

I This course covers the security issues associated with wireless networks. Emerging wireless 
technologies, standards and protocols are explored. The course will define and demonstrate 
various threats to wireless security. Topics include security service, security protocol, and se- 
curity architecture for wireless. Details of wireless encryption techniques are examined. 

( COMP-645. Artificial Intelligence Credit 3 (3-0) 

i This course presents the theory of artificial intelligence, and application of the principles of 
artificial intelligence to problems that cannot be solved, or cannot be solved efficiently, by 
standard algorithmic techniques. Knowledge representation, and Knowledge-based systems. 
Topics include search strategies, production systems, heuristic search, expert systems, infer- 
ence rules, computational logic, natural language processing. Predicate calculus is discussed. 
An artificial intelligence language is presented as a vehicle for implementing concepts of arti- 
ficial intelligence. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 115 



COMP-653. Computer Graphics Credit 3 (3-0) C 

This is a course in fundamental principles and methods in the design, use, and understanding ol 
computer graphic systems. Topics include coordinate representations, graphics functions, and 
software standards. Hardware and software components of computer graphics are discussed;; 
The course presents graphics algorithms. It also introduces basic two-dimensional transforma-1 
tions, reflection, shear, windowing concepts, clipping algorithms, window-to- viewport 
transformations, segment concept, files, attributes and multiple workstation, and interactive 
picture-construction techniques. 

COMP-662. Computer Aided Instruction Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides a conceptual foundation for the development of instructional tools based 
on a variety of learning theories. Students will learn how to design and implement Computer] 
Aided Instruction (CAI) projects using authoring software. As part of the implementation pro-t 
cess, a multimedia programming language will be studied and practiced. The concept otj 
Intelligent Computer Aided Instruction (ICAI) will be introduced. 

COMP-663. Compiler Construction Credit 3 (3-0)| 

This course emphasizes the theoretical and practical aspects of constructing compilers for com 
puter programming languages. The course covers principles, models, and techniques used in 
the design and implementation of compilers, interpreters, and assemblers. Topics include lexi4 
cal analysis, parsing arithmetic expressions and simple statements, syntax specification, 
algorithms for syntax analysis, object code generation, and code optimization. Each student 
will develop and implement a compiler. 

COMP-670. Advanced Computer Architecture Credit 3 (3-0)| 

This is a course that examines the control and storage structures that facilitate the execution! 
and management of logically segmented programs and data. Of special focus are input-output j 
mechanisms, performance tuning, and microprogramming. 

COMP-681. Formal Methods Credit 3 (3-0) 

In this course formal methods that model the software development process will be studied. 
Fundamental and practical methodologies and theories, including set theory and the founda- 
tions of software engineering will be emphasized. Applications to formal specifications, 
object-oriented programming and data modeling will be examined. Topics include: set theory ,\ 
relations and functions, induction and recursion, symbolic logic, complex models, and applica- 
tion case studies. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 

COMP-700. Independent Study Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course can be used for study of advanced topics in computer science pertinent to the 
student's interest under supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor! 

COMP-710. Software Specification, Analysis and Design Credit 3 (3-0) ; 

This course examines the formalization of software requirements and the analysis of the flow 
of data through a proposed large software system. Methodologies covered include Structured 
Analysis (data flow diagramming), hierarchy charts, entity-relationship data diagrams, proce- 
dure specifications, and Information Engineering. Additional methodologies addressed include 
Jackson Structured Diagrams, Harlan Black Boxes, and Object-Oriented Analysis techniques. 



116 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



COMP-711. Software System Design, Implementation, Verification and Validation 

Credit 3(3-0) 
Chis course proceeds from the evaluation of a completed system design for completeness, 
borrectness, information engineering, and functionality. Accepted industry and academic stan- 
dards for such reviews will be used, for example leveling of data flow diagrams, measures of 
^module cohesion, control structures, and function point estimation. As part of the implementa- 
j tion process, verification and validation methodologies will be studied and practiced. An actual 

system will be implemented by the end of the semester. Prerequisite: COMP-710. 

COMP-712. Software Project Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

j: This course examines the nature of data processing projects, definitions of purpose, scope, 
(Sobjectives, deliverable dates, and quality standards. Interpersonal interaction and people-ori- 
tented management techniques are studied, along with team member measurement and assessment 
methods. Project management tools such as PERT (Project Evaluation and Review Technique), 
and CPM (Critical Path Method) are covered. Managerial styles in motivating, innovating, and 
organizing will be examined, along with techniques for improving these skills. Equipment and 
software selection and installation guidelines, and the proper use of outside consulting services 

will be examined. 

i| 

COMP-713. Social Impacts of Software Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course examines the increasing importance of computer technology in the functionality of 
lour economy, our government, and our industry. Potential impacts upon personal privacy and 
autonomy are examined in relation to the public policy and social impacts of computer technol- 
ogy. The role and opportunity for historically under-represented technical professionals will be 
explored. Interdisciplinary readings, written and oral presentations, and in class debates are 
'required. Outside speakers from related disciplines are invited to participate. 

COMP-714. CASE, Automated Development and Information Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

Beginning with the concepts of automated development, various models are reviewed in detail, 
especially Information Engineering, Methodology assessment approaches are covered, espe- 
cially the Software Engineering Institute Process Maturity model, and a variety of organizational 
impacts of technology are examined. Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) is cov- 
ered through tutorial laboratory sessions and a problem assignment. Topics include fundamentals 
of data analysis, diagramming tools for data modeling process analysis, presentation architec- 
ture, communications architecture, data architecture, process architecture, and application 
construction. Techniques and tools for defining menu structures, screens and screen dialogues, 
and user interface management systems are studied, as are the general principles of physical 
design. 

iCOMP-715. Decision Support Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

iThis course examines methods of inference under uncertainty and problem-solving strategies 
fas key components of decision support systems. Knowledge based systems, knowledge acqui- 
sition and representation, and the planning, design and implementation of computer-assisted 
decision systems are covered. The interactive use of software for management decision mak- 
'ing is examined through examples drawn from decision modeling, simulations, and large-scale 
^commercial applications. 

sCOMP-716. Object-Oriented Programming and Software Reuse Credit 3 (3-0) 

(Introduce software reuse principles and reuse driven software development. Reuse techniques 
will be addressed that include reuse readiness assessment, corporate reuse plan creation and 
organizing for reuse. Discuss application package selection, selecting reusable components 
and identifying candidate reusable components. Teach and use the object-oriented program- 

i Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 117 



ming language Java, emphasize its object-oriented features and how to use Java to develojj 
reusable components, subsystems and frameworks. 

COMP-717. Software Fault Tolerance Credit 3 (3-0 

The principles, techniques and current practices in the area of fault tolerant computing with ai] 
emphasis on system structure and dependability are examined in this course. Major topic 
include system models, software/hardware interaction, failure and reliability, fault tolerance 
principles, redundancy, rollback and recovery strategies, and N-version programming. Redun 
dancy in data structures and the validation of fault tolerant software are studied. 

COMP-718. Object Oriented Software Engineering Credit 3 (3-0 

This course covers the concept of the "object-oriented life cycle", demonstrating a practica' 
methodology for the application of object oriented methods to large projects. The specifi< 
problems and solutions for large software systems are discussed. Object Oriented Require 
ments Analysis (OORA), Object-Oriented Requirements Specification (OORS), Object Orientec 
Analysis (00 A), Object Oriented Design (OOD), and Object Oriented Domain Analysi 
(OODA) are covered. Existing and upcoming object oriented Computer Aided Software Engi 
neering (CASE) tools are examined and object oriented database design issues are discussec 
with analysis of specific systems currently in practice or under development. 



I 



COMP-723. Intrusion Detection Credit 3 (3-0 

This course introduces the concepts, techniques, tools, and the state of the art in the area o 
network intrusion detection systems. Topics to be covered include: network and computer sys 
tern security fundamentals, network security models and approaches, attack classification ant 
analysis, intrusions detection techniques and tools (vulnerability scanners, network sniffer 
system monitoring and logging, etc), firewall, as well as the tools and techniques for intrusioi 
signature analysis, such as TCPdump and Snort, etc. The course will be a seminar-like, re 
search-oriented class. Students are required to actively participate in the class presentation 
and discussions. Besides the textbooks, we will read and discuss many recent technical paper 
from current research in intrusion detection. 

COMP-732. Advanced Software Tools Credit 3 (3-0 

The software tools utilized in the high performance and massively parallel computing environ 
ments are indispensable to the practicing computer scientist. Message passing, profiling! 
languages, compilers, porting, system library usage, cache optimization, and in-lining are th 
topics of this course. 

COMP-733. Parallel Computing Applications Credit 3 (3-0 

Many problems in computing can be solved more efficiently on a parallel computer. The paral 
lei computing paradigm is the main focus of this course. The applicability of Amdahl's lavv 
PRAM models, matrix by vector transforms, matrix by matrix graphics and visualization corn 
putations will be discussed. 

COMP-740. Advanced Artificial Intelligence Credit 3 (3-0 

This course is a further study of artificial intelligence principles, with a focus on knowledg 
based systems. The course examines planning, belief revision, control, and system evaluatioi 
and implementation. Advanced topics include automated theorem proving, learning and robot 1 
ics, neural nets, and the adequacy of existing theoretical treatments. 

COMP-741. Knowledge Representation and Acquisition Credit 3 (3-0 

The representation formalisms used in artificial intelligence are explained, along with repre 
sentation selection and implementation in common Artificial Intelligence languages and shells 
Formalisms include first order logic and its extensions, semantic nets, frames and scripts, am. 



118 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Futur 



KL-ONE-like languages. Knowledge acquisition is introduced as eliciting knowledge, inter- 
breting elicited data within a conceptual framework, and the formalizing of conceptualizations 

Drior to software implementation. Knowledge acquisition techniques such as protocol analysis, 
/repertory grids, and laddering are examined. 

COMP-742. Automated Reasoning Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course studies the computational aspects of logic via propositional and predicate calculi, 
as well as the theory underlying their automation through logic programming languages. Vari- 
ous forms of resolution and their soundness and completeness are examined along with 
unification and its properties. Proof procedures and their search characteristics, term rewriting, 
,and techniques such as narrowing are researched as a means of theory resolution. The relation- 
ship of formal specification techniques such as cut elimination, efficiency, and implementation 
issues are addressed. Prerequisite: COMP-645. 

COMP-745. Computational Linguistics Credit 3 (3-0) 

•A. presentation of computational linguistics theory and practice. Advanced readings that em- 
phasize theories of dialogue and research methodologies are examined. Technical writing for 
(journals and conferences is stressed as a goal of research output. Prerequisite: COMP-645. 

COMP-747. Computer Vision Methodologies Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course researches techniques for image understanding, both low-level and high-level im- 
l age processing, mathematical morphology, neighborhood operators, labeling and segmentation. 
Vision methods covered include perspective transformation, motion, the consistent-labeling 
problem, matching, object models, and knowledge-based vision. Prerequisite: COMP-653. 
i 

COMP-749. Intelligent Robots Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course examines intelligent robot systems as inclusive of knowledge representations, path 
finders, inference systems of rules and logic, and image understanding and spatial reasoning 
isystems. Problems of navigation, algorithm development, robot programming languages and 
multiple robot co-operation are explored. 

COMP-750. Distributed Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course examines the operating system concepts necessary for the design and effective use 
of networked computer systems. Such concepts include communication models and standards, 
remote procedure calls, name resolution, distributed file systems, security, mutual exclusion, 
and distributed databases. Students are required to construct an advanced implementation of 
distributed operating system facilities or a simulation of same. 

COMP-753. Performance Modeling and Evaluation Credit 3 (3-0) 

Common techniques and current results in the performance evaluation of computer systems are 
studied in this course. Background material in probability theory, queuing theory, simulation, 
and discrete mathematics is reviewed so that a performance evaluation of resource manage- 
ment algorithms for operating systems and database management systems in parallel and 
distributed environments may be developed. Prerequisite: COMP-755. 

COMP-755. Advanced Operating Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course centers on operating systems for multi-processing environments: concurrent pro- 
cesses, mutual exclusion, job scheduling, memory, storage hierarchy, file systems, security, 
and distributed processing. Also discussed are virtual resource management strategies. A de- 
sign project involving the construction of operating facilities is produced. 






Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 119 



COMP-767. Computer Network Architecture Credit 3 (3-0 

This is a course in the architecture of computer communication networks and the hardware anc 
software required to implement the protocols that define the architecture. Basic communica 
tion theory, transmission technology, private and common carrier facilities, internationa 
standards, satellite communications, and local area networks are examined. Methods of perfor 
mance analysis and communication network modeling are discussed. 

COMP-770. Computer Organization and Programming for 

Scientific Computing Credit 3 (3-0 

Computer programming in the High Performance Computing environment is unlike that of the 
common workstation or desktop computing platform. Programming parallel computers witl 
regard to data transfer (MPI), data storage and process execution are the main focus of thi: 
course. The architecture and organization of various parallel computing platforms are examined 

COMP-780. Semantics of Programming Languages Credit 3 (3-0 

This course examines the formal treatment of the specification, meaning, and correctness o 
programs. Required mathematical results are examined, in areas such as universal algebra anc 
category theory. Major course topics include the lambda calculus, type systems for program 
ming languages, polymorphism, algebraic specification, rewrite systems, and semantic domains 
The denotational semantics of programming languages, program logics, and program verifica 
tion are discussed. 

COMP-785. Advanced Design and Analysis of Algorithms Credit 3 (3-0 

This course discusses the design and analysis of efficient algorithms and algorithmic para 
digms. Applications include sorting, searching dynamic structures, graph algorithms 
computationally hard problems, and NP completeness. 

COMP-786. Multiagent Systems Credit 3 (3-0 

This course primarily addresses multiagent systems, emphasizing collaboration and group at 
tributes. Topics include planning for multiagent tasks and distributed planning, distributee 
problem solving, agent communication languages (involving speech acts), negotiation, ontolo- 
gies and knowledge sharing, distributed rational decision making (involving techniques fron 
economics), societal theories (from philosophy), and computational organization theory. For 
malisms (including modal logics, process algebras, Petri nets, and Statecharts) are presentee 
and applied to the specification and modeling of multiagent systems. 

COMP-790. Special Topics in Computer Science Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course permits research in advanced topics pertinent to the student's program of study 
Prerequisite: Permission of advisor. 

COMP-792. Computer Science Masters Seminar Credit 1 (1-0; 

Discussions and reports of subjects in computer science and allied fields are presented. 

COMP-793. Masters Supervised Teaching Credit 3 (3-0) 

Students will gain teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the studeni 
in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during 
the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment. 

COMP-796. Masters Project Credit 3 (3-0 

The student will conduct advanced research of interest to the student and the instructor. A 
written proposal, which outlines the nature of the project and the deliverables, must be submit- 
ted for approval. This course is only available to project option students. Prerequisite: Permission 
of advisor. 



1 20 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



OMP-797. Masters Thesis Credit 3 (3-0) 

faster of science thesis research will be conducted under the supervision of the thesis commit- 
tee chairperson leading to the completion of the master's thesis. This course is only available to 

ihesis option students. Prerequisite: Permission of advisor. 

i 

COMP-799. Continuation Research Credit 1 (1-0) 

Continue incomplete thesis or project work. 



] 'Jncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 121 



Construction Management and Occupational Safety & Health 



http://www.ncat.edu/sot 
David A. Dillon, Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Construction Management and Occupational Safety and Healtr 
(CM&OSH) prepares graduates to work in the fields of construction and safety and health' 
Most courses are structured with lecture and laboratory components which encourages botr 
theoretical and practical applications. Graduates receive, depending upon the degree option 
instruction in: estimating, project management, scheduling and planning, industrial hygiene 
accident recognition, fundamentals of fire protection and many other related topics. Further| 
courses in business application, accounting and statistics are a part of the curriculum. 



DEGREES OFFERED 

Construction Management - Master of Science in Industrial Technology 
Occupational Safety and Health - Master of Science in Industrial Technology 
Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health - Master of Science in Industrial Technolog) 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 



■■: 



The School of Technology at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University 
offers a Master of Science in Industrial Technology (MSIT) degree. The program is designee 
with several options, three of which are in the Department of Construction Management anc 
Occupational Safety and Health. These three aforementioned options are: Construction Man 
agement; Occupational Safety and Health and Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health 

These programs are designed to increase a student's understanding of industrial manage-i 
ment challenges in an array of technical areas and to explore effective methods for dealing witfi 
technological evolutions and change. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

The Master of Science in Industrial Technology, within the School of Technology, re-, 
quires the GRE General Test as part of the admission process. No minimum score is required ai 
this time. Please contact the Graduate School Office for more information. 



DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS 



: 



The Master of Science in Industrial Technology degree program in Construction Manage- 
ment has a thesis option which requires 12 credit hours of CORE courses, 6 credit hours o\ 
Management course; 9 credit hours of thesis option. The non-thesis option requires the same 
number of credit hours in CORE courses, Management courses, and Technical courses; how 
ever, 9 credit hours of Non-Thesis option are substituted. 

PROGRAM CURRICULA 
CORE COURSES 



MSIT 610 Problem Solving in Industrial Technology 

MSIT 779 Statistical & Research Methods in Industrial Technology I 

MSIT 700 Concepts of Technological Innovations 

MSIT 740 Leadership Development Seminar 



122 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



! 



..CM 692 

:M7io 

:M720 



.(CM 603 
Ml 617 
M618 
MA 650 

; CM 675 
? CM 678 
CM 685 
CM 686 
CM 715 
CM 750 
CM 780 



MSIT 780 
MSIT 791 

■MSIT 792 

)■ 

■i 

[MSIT 750 
MSIT 751 
tMSIT 789 



MANAGEMENT COURSES 

Project Management 

Advanced Construction Management and Organization 

Construction Contract Administration 

TECHNICAL COURSES 

Environmental Issues in Construction Technology 

Independent Study I 

Independent Study II 

Construction Contracts and Law 

Advanced Construction Planning and Scheduling 

Real Estate and Land Development 

Experiential Graduate Internship 

Special Problems in Construction Management 

Productivity and Methods Improvement in Construction 

Research Methods in Construction 

Emerging Trends in CM of International Projects 

THESIS OPTION 

Statistical and Research Methods in Industrial Technology II 
Thesis I 
Thesis II 



NON-THESIS OPTION 



Internship I 
Internship II 

Master's Project 



The Master of Science in Industrial Technology Degree Program in Occupational Safety 
and Health requires the same course courses and thesis and non-thesis options as for the Con- 
struction Management degree program; however, the following management and technical dec- 
eives are used in this degree program: 



OSH614 
OSH 708 
•OSH 709 
( OSH710 



OSH 600 
OSH 613 
OSH 630 
OSH 632 
OSH 637 
OSH 642 
OSH 672 
OSH 678 



MANAGEMENT COURSES 

Industrial Relations 

Occupational Safety and Health Management 
Current Issues in Occupational Health and Safety 
Legal Issues in Occupational Health & Safety Practice 

TECHNICAL COURSES 

Occupational Toxicology I 

Industrial Hygiene Ventilation 

Industrial Safety 

Design of Engineering Hazard Controls 

Machine and welding Safety 

Electrical Safety 

Systems Safety and Other Analytical Methods 

Experiential Education I 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



123 



OSH 679 Experiential Education II 

OSH 700 Special Problems in Occupational Health and Safety 

OSH 704 Occupational Epidemiology 

OSH 706 Noise Control 

OSH 712 Education and Training Methods for Safety 

OSH 73 1 Toxicology for the Industrial Hygienist 

OSH 75 1 Industrial Ventilation 

The Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health Degree Program is an interdiscil 
plinary concentration which is designed to prepare individuals with a background in environi 
mental safety and health. Graduates will become associated with the scientific, managerial,! 
and supervisory activities in industry, as well as other business sectors. Individuals will de 
velop both technical skills as well as environmental safety and health management skills fo 
industry applications and entrepreneurship. 

The EOSH concentration (42 credit hours— all coursework) is comprised of a broad rang< 
of topics including: environmental health, environmental science, environmental education 
solid waste management, highway operations safety, epidemiology, air pollution, electronic 
and computer technology, and environmental toxicology. 

This program requires the same CORE courses as those of the Construction Managemen 
and Occupational Safety and Health programs; however, the remaining portion of the progran 
is as follows: 

I 
MANAGEMENT ELECTIVES I 

! 



ft 



AGED 60 1 Environmental Education 

BIO 700 (or) Environmental Science 

ECT 634 Electronic Instrumentation for Remove Sensing Applications 

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

ANSC 624 Environmental Toxicology 

CIEN 6 1 6 Solid Waste Management 

CIEN 618 Air Pollution Control 

CIEN 710 Hazardous Waste Management 

CIEN 756 Highway Operations Safety 

OSH 706 Noise Control 

OSH 704 Occupational Epidemiology 

OSH 710 Legal Issues in Occupational Safety & Health 

The CM and OSH programs require a minimum of 36 semester hours and the EOSH pro 
gram requires a minimum of 42 semester hours. All programs require a student to pass a writ 
ten comprehensive examination. In addition, at least fifty percent (50%) of the courses counted 
toward the Master of Science degree must be numbered 700 and above, and students mus 
maintain and complete the program with an overall GPA of 3.0 or better on a scale of 4.0. Up tc 
six semester hours of graduate work may be transferred from another university, provided it l! 
not a part of any prior undergraduate degree program. Transfer credit must be at a level compa 
rable to 600 or 700 level courses at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University! 
The GRE exam must be taken prior to unconditional acceptance into the program. Further 
students without sufficient undergraduate preparation may be required to take additional uni 
dergraduate course work. 



1 24 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Futuri 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT AND 

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH 

(Undergraduate/Graduate) 

Construction Management 

2M 603. Environmental Technology for Construction Credit 3 (3-0) 

i The environmental issues facing the construction industry are studied. Issues include site man- 
agement, water supply, storm water management, sewage disposal, solid and hazardous waste 
Imanagement, air and noise pollution. Emphasis will be placed on local, state and federal stan- 
dards that impact upon construction projects during each phase from design to completion. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

JlM 617. Independent Studies I Credit 3 (3-0) 

„>tudy is arranged on a special construction topic of interest to the student and faculty member, 
, vho will act as advisor. Consent of Instructor Required. 

:M 618. Independent Studies II Credit 3 (3-0) 

c study is arranged on a special construction topic of interest to the student and faculty member, 
3 vho will act as advisor. Consent of Instructor Required. 

2M 650. Construction Contracts and Law Credit 3 (3-0) 

fhis course deals with contracts and the law in regard to construction company formation, 
methods of advertising, bidding process, contract formation and awards. Special emphasis is 
blaced on law pertaining to the construction industry. Extensive case studies are reviewed. 
Prerequisite: CM 594 or equivalent. 

CM 675. Advanced Construction Planning and Scheduling Credit 3 (2-3) 

fhe planning, scheduling, and organizing of construction projects to control time, costs and 
)ther resources are studied. Emphasis is on advanced preparation, analysis, and control of 
letwork schedules, using computers and a variety of software. Prerequisite: CM 594 or equiva- 
ent. 

CM 678. Real Estate and Land Development Credit 3 (3-0) 

fnis course will provide an overview of land planning and development. A step-by-step de- 
scription of the land development process and the relationship of each of the steps to the overall 
orocess will be the main focus. Topics to be covered include regulatory and financial elements 
is they relate to the development process such as zoning, floor area rations, development bo- 
ms for amenities, zoning variances, building permits and inspections, real estate taxes, 
development districts, historic preservation, market feasibility studies, financial analysis, man- 
agement, and leasing processes. Prerequisite: CM 216 or equivalent. 

CM 685. Graduate Internship I Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is an internship experience in construction-related industries. A special project is 

Required. Consent of Graduate Advisor. 

■a 

ftM 686. Graduate Internship II Credit 3 (3-0) 

i This course is an internship experience in construction-related industries. A special project is 
required. Consent of Graduate Advisor. 



Jncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 125 



CM 690. Special Problems in Construction Management Credit 3 (3-0 

Study is arranged on a special construction management topic of interest to students and fac 
ulty member who will act as advisor. Topics may be analytical and/or experimental and require 
independent study with a construction industry partner. Consent of Instructor and Constructior 
Industry Partner. 

CM 692. Project Management Credit 3 (3-OJ 

A comprehensive study of project management functions at the managerial level. Special sis or 
project organization, planning, scheduling, resource allocation, budgeting and control. Pre 
requisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. 



: 



I 



i 



CM 710. Advanced Construction Practices and Organization Credit 3 (3-0^ 

Advanced construction practices are developed at the project level. Construction company 
organization, project preplanning, value engineering concepts, cost control and application o\ 
construction control techniques to construction project development are studied as they relat 
to construction. Pre-requisite: CM 598; Graduate standing. 

CM 715. Productivity and Methods Improvement in Construction Credit 3 (3-0 

Methods and techniques of analyzing construction work to improve productivity are studied 
Total quality management, worker motivation, productivity ratings, crew balancing and wort 
measurement are discussed and developed as models for change in the construction manage 
ment process. Prerequisites: CM 710; Graduate Standing. 

CM 720. Construction Contract Administration Credit 3 (3-OJ 

This course will focus on contracts for design and construction of structures. Legal aspects 
labor-management relationships, estimating and bidding strategies are incorporated into a stud) 
of administrative procedures. Computer applications in contract administration are reviewed 
Pre-requisite: Graduate standing. 



i 



,: 



!: 



CM 750. Research Methods in Construction Credit 3 (3-0 

Fundamentals of construction research methods, techniques, research design, data collection 
and analysis with relevant computer applications are incorporated into the course. Pre-requi 
site: ECON 305. 



IS 



CM 780. Emerging Trends in Construction Management of 

International Projects Credit 3 (3-0 

Project delivery systems, remote sensing, three-dimensional documentation, site logistics, con 
struction materials and methods development, international law, cultural and demography I 
differences are applied to the construction process. Study will emphasize the international as 
pect of the industry. 



Occupational Safety and Health 



OSH 600. Occupational Toxicology I Credit 3 (3-0 

This course is a basic survey of the principles of toxicology. Emphasis will be placed on the 
effects of common industrial toxicants; absorption, distribution, secretion and bio-transforma 
tion of toxicants; and toxicological assay methods. Mechanisms of action, testing, risU 
assessment, carcinogenesis, oncogenes, receptors, toxicological evaluation, and host/environ 
mental interactions will be discussed. 



OSH 613. Industrial Hygiene Ventilation Credit 3 (3-0] 

This course will acquaint health and safety professionals with the principles of local and 
general ventilation systems. Topics covered include: basic terms and formula, hoods, desigri 



1 26 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



I 



: 



ISi 



considerations, air cleaners, fans, exhaust system performance, dilution ventilation, comfort 
jentilation, make-up air requirements, indoor air quality standards and HVAC systems. 

f»SH 614. Industrial Relations Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is an overview of legislations and methods pertinent to the practice of occupa- 
onal safety and health in the human resource environment. Emphasis is placed on total quality 
tanagement, anti-discrimination legislation, wage and hour law, workers' compensation, training 
,or safety, behavioral aspects of safety, and the process of health and safety inspections of the 
Occupational Safety and Health Administration. 

( 9SH 617. Independent Study I Credit 3 (3-0) 

itudents will study a special OSH topic of interest to the student and an OSH faculty member 
>ho will supervise the study. 

il! >SH 700. Special Problems in Occupational Safety & Health Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides an opportunity to study special areas in the discipline. Course con- 
jnt will be determined by the Department and the instructor with a complete syllabus each 
me the course is offered. 

ksn 704. Occupational Epidemiology Credit 3 (3-0) 

: 'he main focus of this course is on the fundamentals of occupational epidemiology, epidemio- 
ogical methods used in both chronic and infectious occupational disease epidemiology, 
pplication of methods to safety and health research and practice will be stressed. Epidemio- 
pgic topics will also be related to subjects in occupational safety and health management. 

4>SH 706. Noise Control Credit 3 (3-0) 

nhis course will cover the following topics: properties of sound, occupation damage-risk crite- 
lia, noise surveys and measuring equipment, noise control programs, and engineering controls. 

fl )SH 708. Occupational Safety & Health Management I Credit 3 (3-0) 

■l'his course is an overview of management tools, such as goal setting, planning, organizing, 
itc. to the OSH program so as to enhance the safety and health of employees in the workplace 
nd compliance with the applicable local, state and national standards. An emphasis is placed 
in the development, implementation and evaluation of written OSH programs. 

ll )SH 709. Occupational Safety & Health Management II Credit 3 (3-0) 

V study of the principles of the development and management of materials, techniques, and 
"rocedures used in the implementation of occupational safety and health programs and their 
ipplication in a variety of occupational settings. Examined will be the management techniques, 
lovernmental relations, and safety and health programs developed for industry. The course 
i/ill focus on the history of the safety and health movement; government regulations; safety 
nd health program organization; hazard information and analysis process; and implementa- 
ion of an occupational safety and health program. 

,DSH 710. Legal Issues in OSH Practice Credit 3 (3-0) 

/his course is designed to review and analyze occupational safety and health and environmen- 
|lil regulations. Significant court cases and litigation procedures will be presented to show the 
(itudent how regulatory compliance and interpretations evolve. 

)SH 711. Current Issues in Occupational Safety and Health Credit 3 (3-0) 

jihis course explores contemporary issues related to the field of Occupational Safety and Health, 
therefore the content for this course will vary depending upon occurrences within our society 
i nd the world as they relate to this field of study. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 127 



OSH 712. Education and Training Methods of Safety Credit 3 (3-0 

Lectures with emphasis on education/training for the control or prevention of occupationa 
injuries or illnesses. Education/training methods, materials and available courses are stressed 
The student is expected to determine the need for education training, design a program for i 
specific control effort and establish criteria for evaluation of the program. 

OSH 731. Toxicology for the Industrial Hygienist Credit 3 (3-0 

This course is a basic survey of the principles of toxicology. Emphasis will be placed on th« 
effects of common industrial toxicants; absorption, distribution, secretion, and biotransformas $ 
tion of toxicants; and toxicological essay methods. Prerequisite: OSH 416 or approval o| ist 
instructor. j el 

OSH 751. Industrial Ventilation Credit 3 (2-2 1 " 

This course is an introduction to the design of local exhaust ventilation systems for the contro 
of airborne contaminants. An emphasis will be placed on the velocity pressure method of pre 
dieting system performance, and minimization of total installation and operational costs 
Prerequisite: OSH 416 or approval of instructor. 



isi 



IT 



1 28 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Futun 



k 



Curriculum and Instruction 



4 

Dorothy D. Leflore, Chairperson 

201 Hodgin Hall 

(336) 334-7848 

OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction provides the professional studies compo- 
nent for the preparation of effective teachers and school personnel at the bachelor's degree and 
toaster's degree levels. The department cooperates with the various academic departments of 
le University for teacher education preparation. The department offers graduate degrees in 
e areas of elementary education and instructional technology. In addition, Licensure only is 
mailable in elementary education and special education. 

PROFESSIONAL STUDIES COMPONENT 



r , 



The professional studies component of the Teacher Education Program is designed to pro- 
ide for the development of those competencies essential to the professional role of a teacher 
r special service personnel. At the graduate level, approximately 20 to 40 percent of the graduate 
rogram is comprised of professional studies. Candidates for the degree in teacher education 
rust complete a minimum of 15 semester hours in professional studies. 

ACCREDITATION 

All Teacher Education Programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation 
f Teacher Education (NCATE) and approved by the North Carolina Department of Public 
tistruction. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

In addition to preparing teachers for elementary education (K-6) and special education, a 
egree or licensure in these fields also provides for career opportunities in other areas related to 
le education of children and youth. 

The instructional technology program has four program concentration areas that prepare 
tudents for different career paths. Students who do not hold a teaching license can prepare for 
iareers in Instructional Technology, in Business and Industry settings. Individuals who cur- 
ently hold a North Carolina "A" teaching license may pursue coursework that prepares them 
or licensure as school media coordinators (076 licensure), instructional technologists-comput- 
rs (077 licensure), or instructional technologists-telecommunications (074 licensure). 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Master of Arts in Teaching 

Master of Science in Instructional Technology 

MA .Ed. in Elementary Education 

VI A .Ed. in Reading 



Jncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 1 29 



GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

Degree seeking students must follow the general admission requirements for graduati 
studies and meet other requirements as stated in "Admission and Other Information". 

THE ELEMENTARY EDUCATION GRADUATE PROGRAM 

The Elementary Education Graduate Program provides advanced studies in the field o 
elementary education commensurate with INTASC, NCATE, SDPI, and National Board Certii ^ 
fication Standards. The program provides experiences in research, technology, methodology & 
diversity, and learning theory. The program also requires a product of learning which includes & 
a final comprehensive examination, a basic portfolio, and either a research project or a comprei ^ 
hensive portfolio that meets the requirements for submission for National Board Certification 1 ^ 



!■ 



Licensure Only Students 

Candidates who are admitted to graduate studies as licensure only students cannot be ad 
mitted to the Graduate Program until Class A licensure in elementary education is obtained 

After a student obtains a Class A Certification, application for admission to the graduatdl 
program may be pursued. 

Admission Criteria 

Other criteria for admission are GRE or MAT scores, and an undergraduate GPA of 2.5 oi 
better. It is the responsibility of the candidate to meet these requirements as well as any othei 
requirements of the School of Graduate Studies. 

Course Requirements 

The Curriculum Guide outlines the sequence of required courses and the benchmarks. A \ 
copy of this guide will be kept in the student's folder in the advisor's office to be updated a 
each advising conference. The candidate prior to registration must arrange advising confer-' \ 
ences for the next semester. Before a candidate can register for classes in Phase 2 of the El- 
ementary Education Graduate Program, all the requirements of Benchmark 1 must have beer 
met. Before a candidate can register for classes in Phase 3 of the Elementary Education Gradu- ICl 
ate Program, all the requirements of Benchmark 2 must have been met. The Elementary Edu 
cation Graduate Program requires a 3.0 GPA for graduation. 

Products of Learning 

All students will produce products of learning that include a passing grade on a compre 
hensive examination at Benchmark 1 upon completion of Phase 1 of the Elementary Education 1 
Graduate Program, a basic portfolio that meets the requirements of the North Carolina State 
Department of Public Instruction's performance-based licensure, and completion of the Capstone 1 
Experience. The Capstone Experience requires a passing grade on the final comprehensive 
examination and either a research project or a comprehensive portfolio that meets the require- 
ments for submission for National Board Certification in Elementary Education. 



PHASE 1: DEVELOPING PERSPECTIVES. (Complete before beginning Phase 2.) 

Requirements (15 hours) 

CUIN 711: Research and Inquiry 

CUIN 619: Learning Theories 

CUIN 728: Integrating Technology into the K-12 Curriculum 

CUIN 729: Advanced Methods and Internship 



Documentation of Approvals: ( 1 ) Planning contract; (2) Initial plan for Master's Research Project , 
or Comprehensive Portfolio approved; (3) Core Comprehensive Examination passed. 

1 30 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



I 



BASE 2: CONTENT AND PEDAGOGY. (Complete before beginning Phase 3.) 
equirements (24 hours) 



UIN 720 
LED 750 
LED 751 
LED 752 

iJiLED 754 
LED 753 

i;LED 755 
LED 756 



Curriculum Development 

Teaching and Learning in a Multicultural Classroom 
Advanced Communications 
Advanced Science 
Advanced Mathematics 
Advanced Social Studies 
Teachers as Educational Leaders 
Assessment and Evaluation 
Documentation of Approvals: (1) Master's Research Project Proposal or Four Entries in Com- 
ehensive Portfolio 



HASE 3: CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE 

equirements (1 hour) 

iiUIN 999: Capstone Experience 

'ocumentation of Approvals: (1) Comprehensive Examination passed, and (2) Completion of 
esearch Project or Completion of Comprehensive Portfolio 

INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY 

The Master of Science degree program in Instructional Technology at North Carolina A& 
State University is housed in the School of Education's Department of Curriculum and In- 
ruction. This program helps students in both business and education to acquire skills and 
tnowledge to work with instructional design and delivery at any level. A variety of course 
7 ork is offered to address different professional goals and needs within the field of Instruc- 
onal Technology. All instructional technology program concentrations require a minimum of 
3.0 GPA for graduation. 

Specifically, the course work includes not only the use of a variety of media but the sci- 
ence and art of instructional planning, and the delivery of instruction in a variety of settings. 
, tudents will gain both theoretical and practical knowledge in the field of Instructional Tech- 
ology. There are four Program Concentrations: business and industry and three add-on licen- 
jre areas. 

Accreditation: All programs involving licensure are accredited by the National Council 
m Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the North Carolina Department of Public 
pstruction. See student resources. 

ii 
)n-line Program 

' North Carolina A&T State University offers the Business and Industry track of the In- 
structional Technology Master's program via the World Wide Web. Please consult the Center 
jr Distance Learning Website (http://fac.ncat.edu/dist/default.htm) for further information. 

instructional Technology Specialist Telecommunications (074) Program Concentration 

"ore Requirements to be completed before Content and Pedagogy Courses (18 hours) 

'UIN 711: Research and Inquiry 

!UIN619: Learning Theories 

'UIN 742: Integrating Technology Across the Curriculum 

"UIN 729: Diversity 

'UIN 721: Advanced Methods and Internship 

benchmark #1 - Core Comprehensive Exam 

i 
Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 131 



Required Content and Pedagogy (21 hours) 



CUIN 743 
CUIN616 
CUIN 762 
CUIN 767 
CUIN 766 
CUIN 763 
CUIN 719 



Foundations of Instructional Technology 

Visual Media 

Advanced Internet Uses in Education 

Computer Lab Supervision and Management 

Distance Education 

Multimedia Development and Evaluation 

Internship in Instructional Technology 



Elective Courses - None 

Benchmark #2 - Portfolio 

Benchmark #3 - Capstone: Thesis or Special Project 

Media Coordinator Program Concentration (076) 

Core Requirements to be completed before Content and Pedagogy Courses (18 hours) 

CUIN 711 : Research and Inquiry 

CUIN 619: Learning Theories 

CUIN 742: Instructional Design 

CUIN 728: Integrating Technology Across the Curriculum 

CUIN 729: Diversity 

CUIN 721: Advanced Methods and Internship 

Benchmark #1: Core Comprehensive Exam 

Required Content and Pedagogy (18 hours) 

CUIN 750 

CUIN 613 

CUIN 614 

CUIN 616 

CUIN 716 

CUIN 719 



Cataloging and Media Material 

Developmental Media for Children OR 

Book Selection and Related Materials for Young People 

Visual Media 

Media Center Management 

Internship in Instructional Technology 



Elective Courses (9 hours) 

Benchmark #2: Portfolio and Praxis Examination (Library Media Specialist) 
Benchmark #3: Capstone: Thesis or Special Project 

Instructional Technology Specialist Computer Program Concentration (077) 

Core Requirements to be completed before Content and Pedagogy Courses (18 hours) 

CUIN 711: Research and Inquiry 

CUIN 619: Learning Theories 

CUIN 742: Instructional Design 

CUIN 728: Integrating Technology Across the Curriculum 

CUIN 729: Diversity 

CUIN 721: Advanced Methods and Internship 

Benchmark #1: Core Comprehensive Exam 

Required Content and Pedagogy (18 hours) 

CUIN 743: Foundations of Instructional Technology 

CUIN 760: Programming in BASIC or 

CUIN 76 1 : Programming in LOGO 

CUIN 762: Advanced Internet Uses in Education 



132 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Futun k 



UIN 763 
UIN 767 
UIN 719 



Multimedia Development and Evaluation 
Computer Lab Supervision and Management 
Internship in Instructional Technology 



lective Courses (3 hours) 

enchmark #2: Portfolio 

enchmark #3: Capstone - Thesis or Special Project 

usiness and Industry Program Concentration 

tore Requirements to be completed before Content and Pedagogy Courses (18 hours) 

UIN 711: Research and Inquiry 

UIN 619: Learning Theories 

.UIN 742: Instructional Design 

UIN 743: Foundations of Instructional Technology 

UIN 741 : Instructional Technology Services for Business and Industry 

DED 708: Methods in Adult Education 

enchmark #1: Core Comprehensive Exam 

Required Content and Pedagogy (12 hours) 

UIN 762: Advanced Internet Uses in Education 

UIN 763: Multimedia Development and Evaluation 

ECH 670: Introduction to Workplace Training and Development 

'UIN 719: Internship in Instructional Technology 

ilective Courses (9 hours) 

You may take approved courses from ADED, TECH or GCT). 

benchmark #2: Portfolio 

ienchmark #3: Capstone: Thesis or Special Project 

Masters of Arts in Teaching 

The Master of Arts in Teaching Degree Program is designed for college graduates who 
ave decided to enter the teaching profession, many of whom will already be lateral entry 
jachers, teachers changing fields, and prospective candidates who are taking coursework be- 
are entering the classroom. The Master of Arts in Teaching will enable prospective teachers, 
!/ho bring content knowledge to the graduate degree, the opportunity to develop the knowl- 
edge skills, and dispositions to become excellent teachers. 

For further information regarding the MAT Degree Programs, contact your prospective 
censure content areas. 



M.A.Ed. in Reading Education 

The M.A.Ed, in Reading Education will enable teachers to develop advanced competen- 
jes in the area of literacy/reading, as well as the ability to conduct and use current research to 
inswer current classroom questions about the teaching and learning process. 

Further, the program is aimed at preparing professionals who demonstrate competence in 
eveloping and implementing pedagogically sound instruction in reading for learners who have 
iverse needs, backgrounds, interests and who differ culturally and linguistically. 

For further information regarding the M.A.Ed. Reading Education Degree Program, con- 
act the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. 



uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 133 



CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

Six-Hundred (600) level courses are considered upper level undergraduate and lowe 
level graduate courses. These courses in the department are designed for post-baccalaureat 
students pursuing licensure. 

Students admitted to a graduate program will not be allowed to take more than six hours o 
600 level courses without the approval of his/her advisor. 



:;■' 



ri 



CUIN-600. Cataloging of Media Materials Credit 3 (3-0 

This course offers a survey of various media classifications, storage and retrieval models a 
applied to information centers and their operation. Students will be taught to catalog media b 
using both traditional and technological methods. (F, S, S) 



U 



CUIN-611 . Utilization of Education Media Credit 3 (2-2| I 

Applies basic concepts to problems in teaching and learning with school and adult audiences; iw 
Relates philosophical and psychological bases of communications to teaching. Discusses th< 
role of communications in problem solving, attitude formation, and teaching, methods of se 
lecting and using educational media materials effectively in teaching. It provides experience it 
operating equipment, basic techniques in media preparation and practice in planning and pre "i 
senting a session. (F, S,S) K 

CUIN-613. Developmental Media for Children Credit 3 (3-0 ^ 

This course will entail a study of children's literature with emphasis on aids and criteria fo 
selection of books and other materials for preschool through late childhood ages, story telling "" 
and an investigation of reading interests. (F, S, S) r- 

CUIN-614. Book Selection and Related Materials for Young People Credit 3 (3-0 tt 

A consideration of literature, reading interests, and non-book materials for young people. (F, S, Sj I 

in 

CUIN-616. Visual Media Credit 3 (3-0 

This course provides students with general visual design criteria and the application of thosi 
criteria to a variety of visual media forms. Students will create and evaluate a variety of visua * 
media, such as non-projected forms, projected forms, video, and computer visuals. New form 
of visuals may be included as they are developed. Prerequisite: CUIN 611. (F, S, S) 

CUIN-617. Computers in Education Credit 3 (2-2 I 

The student will be introduced to the various uses and functions of the computer in educationa' ' e ' 
settings. The integration of the computer as a tool for instructor and student use; and its use as s B 
tutor for student use in a variety of formats will be addressed. A basic introduction to the Interne : lle 
and the World Wide Web will also be provided. Students will also explore different hardware M 
and software configurations. This is not a course for introducing computer usage. (F, S, S) 

CUIN-619. Learning Theories Credit 3 (3-0 [ 

This course examines behavioral, cognitive, and constructivist learning theory families anc 
how they impact instructional methods and technology. The course will include writing in 
structional units based upon a variety of theoretical approaches. (F, S, S) 



CUIN-620. Foundations in Reading Credit 3 (3-0 

Basic reading course which considers the broad field of reading - its goal and nature; factor? -t 
affecting its growth; sequential development of skills, attitudes and interests; types of reading 1 1 
approaches; organization and materials in teaching the fundamentals of reading. (F, S, S) 

f 



1 34 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 1 



UIN-621. Word Recognition/Identification Skills Credit 3 (3-0) 

lis course explores phonic (letter-sound correspondence), syntactic (grammar), semantic 
leaning), morphemic (structure) and visual word identification techniques for word recogni- 
on in developmental, corrective and remedial reading programs. Methods of teaching and 
Materials for introducing and reinforcing the skills are included. (F, S, S) 

UIN-622. Teaching Reading Through the Primary Years Credit 3 (3-0) 

Itethods, materials, and techniques used in reading instructions of pre-school through grade 

ree. An examination of learning, the teaching of reading, and curriculum experiences and 

•ocedures for developing reading skills. (F, S, S) 

I 
UIN-623. Methods and Materials in Teaching Reading in 

the Elementary School Credit 3 (3-0) 

he application of principles of learning and child development to the teaching of reading and 
\e related language arts. Methods and approaches to the teaching of reading in the elementary 

fehool; including phonics, developmental measures, informal testing procedures, and the con- 

f ruction and utilization of instructional materials. (F, S, S) 

UIN-624. Teaching Reading in the Secondary School Credit 3 (3-0) 

Lature of a developmental reading program, initiating and organizing a high school reading 
rogram, the reading curriculum, including reading in the content subjects, critical reading, 
rocedures and techniques, and corrective and remedial aspects. (F, S, S) 

UIN-625. Theory of American Public Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

g ji examination of the philosophical resources, objectives, historical influences, social organi- 
sation, administration, support, and control of public education in the United States. (F, S, S) 

CUIN-627. The Afro-American Experience in American Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

(lectures, discussions, and research on the Afro- American in American education, including 
le struggle for literacy, contributions of Afro- Americans to theory, philosophy, and practice of 
ducation in the public schools, private and higher education traces the development of school 

lesegregation, its problems and plans. (F, S, S) 

)i 

£ CUIN-628. Seminar and Practicum in Urban Education Credit 3 (1-4) 

ji synthesis of practical experiences, ideas and issues pertinent to more effective teaching in 
rban areas. (F, S, S) 

fCUIN-629. Classroom Diagnosis in Reading Instruction Credit 3 (3-0) 

£ 4ethods, techniques and materials used in the diagnosis of reading problems in the kindergar- 
; sn-primary area through to intermediate level. Attention is placed upon the pupil and the 
3 iterpretation of physiological, psychological, sociological, and educational factors affecting 
yarning to read. Opportunity is provided for identification, analysis, interpretation of, and 
trategies for fulfilling the reading needs of all pupils. (F, S, S) 

(CUIN-630. Reading Practicum Credit 3 (3-0) 

application of methods, materials and professional practices relevant to teaching pupils. Pro- 
,isions for participation in and teaching of reading. Designed to coordinate the student's 
ackground in reading, diagnosis, learning and materials. Supervised student teaching. Prereq- 
isite: 12 credit hours in reading. (F, S, S) 
I 

KJIN-631. Reading for the Atypical Learner Credit 3 (3-0) 

Attention to the gifted child, the able retarded, the slow learner, the disadvantaged, and the 
inguistically different child. Special interest groups will be formed for investigation reports. 
F,S,S) 



Incompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 1 35 



CUIN-632. Basic Technology Literacy for K-12 Educators Credit 3 (3-0 

This course provides instruction in basic computer literacy skills and classroom integration fo 
K-12 educators. The instruction is designed to meet the North Carolina Department of Publilfc 
Instruction's requirements for basic level computer competencies for public school teachers; 
Topics include: word processing, spreadsheet usage, database design and management, teache: tf 
utilities, and fundamentals of modern computing. (F, S, S) 



CUIN-681. Issues in Education Credit 3 (3-0 

A critical review of the background and functions of the school as a social institution. (F, S, S 

Graduate Students Only 



&■• 



CUIN-700. Introduction to Graduate Study Credit 2 (2-0 1 

Methods of research, interpretation of printed research data, and use of bibliographical tools Is 

(F,S,S) is, 

CUIN-701 . Philosophy of Education Credit 3 (3-Of 1 

A critical study of and a philosophic approach to educational problems. The nature and aims o 
education in a democratic society, relation of the individual to society, interests and disciplines!^ 
play and work, freedom and control, subject matter and method. (F, S, S) 

CUIN-709. Administration and Supervision Credit 3 (3-0f 

This comprehensive course in organization and administration of schools, grades K-12, wil 
focus primary emphasis on the following areas: (1) formal and informal organizational struc 
ture, concepts and practices; (2) the management processes; (3) the administrative functions 
with particular reference to personnel, program, and fiscal management; and (4) leadership 
styles and the leadership role, with special attention to planning, decision-making, and con 
flict-resolution. Prerequisite: CUIN-704. (F, S, S) 

CUIN-710. Educational Statistics Credit 3 (3-0 

The essential vocabulary, concepts, and techniques of descriptive statistics as applied to prob 
lems in education and psychology. (F, S, S) 

CUIN-711. Research and Inquiry Credit 3 (3-0)1 

This course is designed to teach students to be able to locate, read, understand, critique, and use 
the results of research to become more effective professionals and make sound educational 
decisions. Students will develop an understanding of the researcher's methodologies, the pro 
cedures, and results. Students will analyze and evaluate research, judge the usefulness of the 1 
findings for educational practice, and plan research to improve educational practice. (F, S, S) 

CUIN-716. Media Center Management Credit 3 (3-0) I 

In this course students will be expected to explore different methods for organizing and operat- 1 
ing media centers. Students will be expected to create plans for media center organization and 
operation, including budget planning. In addition, students will create plans for both student 
activities and faculty in-service as related to media center use. (F, S, S) 

CUIN-719. Internship in Instructional Technology Credit 3 (1-4)- 

This is a professional laboratory designed to provide the student with on-the-job training and 
direct experiences relating to his/her needs. Each student will be placed according to the pro- 
fessional track he/she has chosen within the program. Students will have an opportunity to 
develop research or special projects in an area related to practical experience. (F, S, S) 

CUIN-720. Curriculum Development Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will focus on basic concepts in curriculum development in K-12 schools. Prerequi- 
sites: Completion of Phase I of the M.S. Degree in Elementary Education or permission of the 
instructor. (F, S, S) 

1 36 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



1UIN-721. Advanced Methods and Internship Credit 3 (3-0) 

[ i 'his course will focus on using an understanding of child development, diversity issues and 
$ Motivational strategies to plan interdisciplinary units of instruction and assessment. Candi- 
dates will create learning experiences and design a variety of modes of assessment and implement 

lese plans. Internship is required. Prerequisites: Admission to the School of Graduate Studies. 

F,S,S) 



^UIN-722. Curriculum in the Secondary School Credit 3 (3-0) 

Curriculum development, functions of the secondary school, types of curricula; emphasis on 
ends, issues, and innovations. (F, S, S) 

:UIN-723. Principles of Teaching Credit 3 (3-0) 

i study of the status of teaching as a profession in the United States; teacher obligations, 
ssponsibilities and opportunities for leadership in the classroom and community with special 
^mphasis on principles of and procedures in teaching. (F, S, S) 

CUIN-724. Problems and Trends in Teaching Science Credit 3 (3-0) 

Attention to major problems of the high school teacher of science. Lesson plans, assignments, 
ssts, etc., are constructed and administered by each student in class. Audiovisual materials, 
(emonstration and laboratory techniques are carried out. (F, S, S) 

KIN-725. Problems and Trends in Teaching Social Sciences Credit 3 (3-0) 

V survey of major problems in the broad field of social studies and consideration of improved 
Vays in presentation and class economy, including lesson plans, assignments, audiovisual ma- 
'erials, and other means of facilitating learning. (F, S, S) 

:UIN-726. Reading in the Content Areas Credit 3 (3-0) 

Attention is given to reading problems and procedures and materials for improving reading in 
ocial studies, science, English, mathematics, a foreign language, home economics, and other 
; ields. (F,S,S) 

(DUIN-727. Workshop in Methods of Teaching Modern Mathematics for 

ji Junior and Senior High School Teachers Credit 3 (3-0) 

fVlodel lesson plans, use of educational media, geometric and trigonometric devices, Truth Tables, 
(ind intuitive and formal logic in the teaching of modern mathematics in the junior and senior 
iiiigh school. (F, S, S) 

:UIN-728. Integrating Technology into the K-12 Curriculum Credit 3 (3-0) 

Ifhis course is designed to introduce teachers to the current and emerging technologies, which 
lean be incorporated into the K-12 curriculum. Prerequisite: Pass a Computer Competency Exam 
©rCUIN617.(F,S,S) 

"UIN-729. Diversity Issues in K-12 Schools Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is designed to examine issues of diversity including economic, gender, ethnic, 
cultural, political, physical and cognitive diversities, and how they impact classroom practices. 

-F,S,S) 

ZTJIN-730. Problems in the Improvement of Reading Credit 3 (3-0) 

A study of current problems, issues, trends, and approaches in the teaching of reading includ- 
ng investigations of underlying principles of reading improvement; coverage of appraisal 
echniques, materials and procedures, innovative and corrective measures; and application of 
"esearch data and literature will be carried out. Prerequisite: A previous graduate course in 
fading. (F,S,S) 



'Jncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 1 37 



Is 



CUIN-731. Advanced Diagnosis in Reading Instruction Credit 3 (3-0 

The diagnosis and treatment of reading difficulties. Study and interpretation of selected test 
useful in understanding and analyzing physiological, psychological, sociological and educa 
tional factors related to reading difficulties. Case studies and group diagnosis. (F, S, S) 



CUIN-732. Organization and Administration of Reading Program Credit 3 (3 

Administrative acts requisite to the creation and guidance of a well-balanced, school-wid 
reading program. The course is for all school personnel who are in a position to make adminis 
trative decisions regarding the school reading program. (F, S, S) 



t 



CUIN-733. Advanced Practicum in Reading Credit 3 (3-0 

Actual experiences with youth and teachers in professional activities. (F, S, S) 



CUIN-734. Seminar and Research in Reading Credit 3 (3-0 

Evaluation of recent research concerning findings, approaches, innovations and organizatioi [, 
of reading instruction. Selected topics for reports and research projects. Independent study o 
selected topics of experimentation. Prerequisite: 24 semester credit hours in graduate courses 1 

(F,S,S) 



jn 



CUIN-742. Instructional Design Credit 3 (3-0 

The course will address the design, systematic development, implementation, modification 
and ultimate evaluation of instructional programs. This will be inclusive of a survey of curren B 
research, objectives, outcomes, analysis of concepts, design of instructional sequences, ant 
assessment of student performance. Each student will develop and assess at least one instruc ^ 
tional program. (F, S, S) 

CUIN-743. Foundations of Instructional Technology Credit 3 (3-0 

This course provides an overview of the Instructional Technology field. Students will be intro 

duced to some of the significant issues, areas, and practices in instructional technology. Thel^ 

history, current trends, and issues in instructional technology and their implications for educaj p, 

tion and training will be discussed during the course. This course also examines the instructiona 

applications of microcomputers and telecommunications in classroom settings . Students wil 

be informed of job opportunities, professional associations, and literature of the profession; 

(F,S,S) 

II 
CUIN-744. Program Evaluation Credit 3 (3-0 

This course will provide students with the basic information needed to evaluate educationa, 

programs and make recommendations for program improvement. Prerequisite: CUIN 742. (F, S, S] I 

CUIN-745. Instructional Technology Services for Business and Industry Credit 3 (3-0 

This course introduces students to the impact of technology within business and industry anc I 
how learning in that environment warrants instruction that differs from that of traditional edu 
cation. Students will have the opportunity to (a) investigate various learning and presentation 
needs of business and industry clients; and (b) apply different delivery methods and techniques 
and technological applications to specific audiences in that environment. (F, S, S) 

CUIN-746. Social Foundations of Instructional Technology Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will provide students with an opportunity to explore the philosophical, personal 
and social issues underlying the universal acceptance of the technological revolution, withj 
special emphasis on technology in education and in K-12 schools. (F, S, S) 

CUIN-747. Independent Study in Instructional Technology Variable Credit (1-3) 1 

Students will pursue individual project(s) and topic(s) of choice with the approval of the in-' J 
structor. (F,S,S) 



1 38 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



I 



JJUIN-748. Special Topics in Instructional Technology Variable Credit (1-3) 

'his course will permit the investigation and study of developing areas/topics of concern in the 
eld of instructional technology. (F, S, S) 

XED-751. Advanced Communication Skills Credit 3 (3-0) 

/his course will focus on approaches for teaching communications skills/language arts and 
Lhildren's literature in elementary school. Prerequisites: Completion of Phase I of the M.S. 
. )egree Program in Elementary Education or permission of the instructor. (F, S, S) 

CLED-752. Advanced Science Credit 3 (3-0) 

/his course will focus on approaches for teaching science in elementary school. Prerequisites: 

Completion of Phase I of the M.S. Degree Program in Elementary Education or permission of 

ae instructor. (F, S, S) 

D 

CLED-754. Advanced Mathematics Credit 3 (3-0) 

"his course will focus on approaches for teaching mathematics in elementary school. Comple- 
tion of Phase I of the M.S. Degree Program in Elementary Education or permission of the 
nstructor. (F, S, S) 

(jCUIN-760. Programming in BASIC Credit 3 (2-2) 

'his course will provide students with an opportunity to learn program logic and structured 
programming for BASIC. Emphasis will be on the use of programming in the K-12 environ- 
ment. Prerequisite: CUIN 617 or equivalent experience. (F, S, S) 

:UIN-761. Programming in LOGO Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course provides students with the opportunity to programming and logic and structured 
nirogramming for LOGO. Emphasis will be on the use of programming in the K-12 environ- 
ment. (F, S, S) 

:UIN-762. Advanced Internet Uses in Education Credit 3 (2-2) 

s Chis course explores use of the Internet for the purpose of enhancing instructional activities. 
'Jtudents will investigate a variety of resources on the Internet, which can be used for instruc- 
tional purposes. Students will explore the World Wide Web and develop Web pages. Prerequisite: 
taN 617 or equivalent. (F, S, S) 

I!UIN-763. Multimedia Development and Evaluation Credit 3 (2-2) 

fhis course offers experiences in the evaluation and development of multimedia instructional 
bresentations using computer-based multimedia capabilities. Theories and research in multi- 
inedia development will be discussed. Prerequisite: CUIN 617 or equivalent. (F, S, S) 

CUIN-764. Educational Software Evaluation and Design Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course will provide students with the opportunity to apply instructional design techniques 
und learning theories to the evaluation and development of educational software. During the 
bourse students will learn storyboarding and use it as a means to create computer-based soft- 
vare. Some limited experiences with authoring software will be provided. Prerequisite: CUIN 
H2. (F, S, S) 

3UIN-765. Authoring Software Credit 3 (2-2) 

students will utilize authoring software to create educational software or develop presenta- 
ions. Students will import graphics, sound, and video into the authoring program and write 
appropriate script routines to implement a variety of actions within the program. Knowledge 
ind usage of authoring software will enable students to create complex multimedia presenta- 
ions or complex tutorial educational software . Prerequisite : CUIN 6 1 7 or equivalent experience . 
F,S,S) 



Jncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 1 39 



CUIN-766. Distance Education Credit 3 (3-0 p 

Students will learn about a variety of distance education delivery systems and methods. Differ 
ent technological configurations will be addressed. Students will review the research on thi 
effectiveness of varied distance delivery systems. (F, S, S) 

CUIN-767. Computer Lab Supervision and Management Credit 3 (2-2 

This course will provide students with an opportunity to explore different methods for super ve 
vising, managing, maintaining, organizing, and operating computer labs in schools. Prerequisite! ,, 
CUIN 617 or equivalent experience. (F, S, S) 



ELED-750. Teaching and Learning in a Multicultural Classroom Credit 3 (3-0 

This course will focus on the incorporation of multicultural issues in the elementary schoo 
curriculum. Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I of the MS Degree Program in Elementar} 

Education or permission of the instructor. (F, S , S) 

jPI 

CUIN-776. Independent Reading in Education II Credit 3 (3-01 to 

Individual study and selected reading in consultation with an instructor. Prerequisite: 24 hours 
of graduate credit. (F, S, S) 



:ii 



CUIN-777. Independent Reading in Education III Credit 3 (3-0 

Individual study and selected reading in consultation with an instructor. Prerequisite: 24 hour 
of graduate credit. (F, S, S) 



id 



ID 



Ml 



CUIN-780. Comparative Education Credit 3 (3-0] 

Historical and international factors influencing the development of national systems of educa 

tion and recent changes in educational programs of various countries. (F, S, S) |P 

! I 
ELED-753. Advanced Social Studies Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will focus on approaches to the teaching of social studies in elementary school and 

the creation of a learning environment that will ensure that all students will learn fundamental 

of social studies. Candidates will be required to conduct field research. (F, S, S) IP 

I 

CUIN-782. Issues in Secondary Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

An analysis of the role of the high school as an educational agency in a democracy. Attention is 

given to: (1) philosophical, psychological, and sociological bases for the selection of learning 

experiences; (2) contrasting approaches to curriculum construction; (3) teaching methods and 

materials; (4) evaluation procedures; and (5) school-community relationships. (F, S, S) 

■ 
CUIN-783. Current Research in Elementary Education Credit 3 (3-0> I 

A critical analysis of the current research in elementary education and the implications of such 

for elementary school educative experiences. (F, S, S) 

1 
CUIN-784. Current Research in Secondary Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

A critical analysis of the current research in secondary education and the implications of such 

for high school educative experiences. (F, S, S) 

ELED 755. Teachers as Educational Leaders Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will focus on the attributes and dispositions of leadership for teachers. Action 
research is required. Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I of the M.S. Degree Program in El- 
ementary Education or permission of the instructor. (F, S, S) 

ELED 756. Assessment and Evaluation Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will focus on multiple modes of assessment and evaluation in elementary school. 
Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I of the M.S. Degree Program in Elementary Education or 
permission of the instructor. (F, S, S) 

140 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Futurel 



UIN-787. Independent Readings in Education III Credit 3 (0-6) 

^dividual study and selected reading in consultation with an instructor. Prerequisite: 24 hours 
§ graduate credit. (F, S, S) 



fUIN-790. Seminar in Educational Problems Credit 3 (1-4) 

intensive study, investigation, or research in selected areas of education; reports and construc- 
i,ve criticism. Prerequisites: A minimum of 24 hours in prescribed graduate courses. (F, S, S) 

UIN-791. Thesis Research (F, S, S) Credit 3 (3-0) 

/UIN-999. Thesis (F, S, S) Credit 1 (1-0) 

i 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

i 

PED-660. Introduction to Exceptional Children Credit 3 (3-0) 

(his course provides an overview of the educational needs of exceptional, emphasis is placed 
in classroom techniques known to be most helpful to children having hearing losses, speech 
isorders, visual problems, emotional, social disabilities and intelligence deviation, including 
low-learners and gifted children. An introduction to the area of special education. This course 
; designed for classroom teachers. (F, S, S) 

PED-661. Psychology of Exceptional Individuals Credit 3 (3-0) 

iji analysis of psychological factors affecting identification and development of individuals 
idth high and low incidence disabilities. (F, S, S) 

fPED-662. Mental Disability Credit 3 (3-0) 

kn overview of mental disabilities across the life span including etiologies, characteristics of 
larious functioning levels, diagnosis, classification and placement, legal issues and current 
best practices" for school and community inclusion. (F, S, S) 

PED-663. Measurement and Evaluation in Special Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

i'he selection, administration, and interpretation of individual tests; intensive study of prob- 
lems in testing exceptional and extremely deviant children; consideration is given to measurement 
tad evaluation of children who are mentally, physically, and emotionally or socially handi- 
lapped. Emphasis is upon the selection and use of group tests of intelligence and the interpretation 
f their results. (F,S,S) 

(PED-667. Specific Learning Disabilities Credit 3 (3-0) 

His course will address specific learning problems associated with reading, writing, language, 
>ognition, perception attention, and arithmetic, social, and emotional disabilities. (F, S, S) 

CPED-668. Children & Youth with Behavioral Disabilities Credit 3 (3-0) 

k. study of issues, definitions, classification, characteristics, causes and prevalence of children 
ind youth with behavioral disorders. It will examine models, assessment and intervention strat- 
egies. (F,S,S) 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 141 



Electrical and Computer Engineering 



fti 



John C. Kelly, Jr., Chairperson 

55 1 McNair Building 

(336) 334-7761 

OBJECTIVE 

The Master of Science Program in Electrical Engineering is designed to provide graduat 
level education for advanced professional practice or for further graduate studies. The prograr 
is open to students with a bachelor's degree in a scientific discipline from an institution o 
recognized standing. The Doctoral Program is the terminal degree within the Department o 
Electrical and Computer Engineering at North Carolina A&T State University. The education 
objectives of these programs are as follows: 

1 . To provide master and doctoral levels of studies for students who completed their bachelor ' 
or master's degrees from the North Carolina A&T State University, or an ABET accred 
ited and equivalent university. 

2. To provide local practicing electrical engineers from the Piedmont Triad, with a part-tim< 
graduate program in electrical engineering. 

3. To provide the region with a full-time graduate electrical engineering program. 

4. To foster research in electrical engineering for the benefit of North Carolina A&T Statiflmc 
University and graduate students. 

5 . To enrich the undergraduate program as a result of student interaction with high qualitj 
engineering faculty concerned with graduate study and research. 

6. To provide a graduate level electrical engineering resource base to support electrical engi 
neering activities in local and regional industry and government. 

7. To foster industrial development in the state and region through the offering of this program. 

The programs emphasize areas of specialization, which are the current strengths of th< 
department. Thus, the department concentrates the following four areas for the master ancl 
doctoral programs: 

• Computer Engineering 

• Communications and Signal Processing 

• Electronic and Optical Materials and Devices 

• Power Systems and Control 

There are other academic programs within the university that are related to the graduate 
programs in Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. They are important because 
they include academic subject matter of potential interest to students as supporting courses anc 
areas of minor concentration. Specific degree programs include master's level programs in the 
following supporting areas: 

• Applied Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry 

• Computer Science 

• Industrial Engineering 

• Mechanical Engineering 

• Architectural Engineering 

• General (interdisciplinary) Engineering 

DEGREES OFFERED 



Master of Science - Electrical Engineering 
Doctor of Philosophy - Electrical Engineering 



i; 



to 



142 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTERS DEGREE PROGRAM 

In order to pursue the degree of Master of Science in Electrical Engineering, one must first 
>e admitted to the Graduate School. The first step toward Graduate School admission is to 
:omplete the required application forms and submit them to the Graduate School Office. In 
iddition to the application forms, two official copies of the student's undergraduate and/or 
p-aduate transcript are required. An official GRE score is required for all overseas students. 
Satisfying the requirements described does not guarantee admission. Students are admitted 
.olely by the department in three categories: 

i 

Unconditional Admission 

An applicant may be given unconditional admission to the MSEE program if he/she pos- 
sesses an undergraduate degree in Electrical Engineering from an ABET accredited institution 
vith an overall GPA of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 scale. In addition, the applicant must have a 3.0 
[average in all engineering courses. International students who did not complete their B.S. de- 
cree program in this country may apply for unconditional status if they have at least a 85 
jercentile score on the GRE and do not require background work. Students will not be given 
Unconditional status unless they take the GRE and submit the scores to the Graduate School. 

-'Provisional Admission 

Applicants may be granted provisional admission if they do not qualify for unconditional 
admission due to one or more of the following reasons: 
i) Applicant has a non-Electrical Engineering baccalaureate engineering degree with a GPA 

of 3.0 or better, but he/she is deficient in required background courses: (Note: Applicant 
ii must require more than 12 credit hours of background courses). 

5) Applicant does not have a degree from an ABET accredited curriculum, such as interna- 
tional students. A minimum GRE score of Verbal + Quantitative = 1100 is required. 
;) Applicant does not have a 3.0 overall GPA in Electrical Engineering. (Note: Applicant 

must have at least a 2.8 overall GPA). 
i) Electrical Engineering students having a GPA less than 2.8, but have minimum GRE Verbal + 

Quantitative scores of 1100. 

A provisionally admitted student must achieve unconditional admission after completing 
'all background courses and 9 graduate credit hours with an average of 3 .0 or better. Upon the 
Satisfaction of the above condition, the student may request through the Graduate Coordinator 
Vor conversion to the unconditional admission by the Graduate School. 
1 All graduate students admitted in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Should meet with the Graduate Coordinator for assignment of a temporary advisor. The tempo- 
rary advisor will assist the student in registration until the student selects a permanent advisor 
ay mutual agreement between the student and the faculty member. Students must select a per- 
manent advisor no later than 9 credit hours into the program. Approval by the Graduate Coor- 
dinator should then be obtained. 

Provisional and PBS students must not take more than 12 graduate credit hours in Electri- 
cal Engineering prior to receiving unconditional admission to the MSEE program. It is the 
student's responsibility to request his/her status change from provisional or PBS status to graduate 
student status to the Graduate School through the Graduate Coordinator in the department. 
Students who fail to have their status upgraded run the risk of not receiving graduate credit for 
completed graduate courses. 



1 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 1 43 



Post-Baccalaureate Studies (PBS) 

This category applies to students lacking a baccalaureate degree in engineering and re-j in- 
quiring 9-15 hours of prerequisites in general engineering background, but possessing a GPA 
of 3.0 or better from an accredited program. 

Upon completion of the required background courses with a "B" average or better, these olj 
students may reapply to the graduate program. (Refer to Graduate Admissions and Section 9 fei 
for a list of the background courses.) 

EL 
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAM 

All applications for admission to the Ph.D. program are subject to review by the Graduate P 
Curriculum Development Committee in the Department. The GCD Committee's recommenda-i ik 
tion is not subject to further review. Satisfying the requirements described below does not ons 
guarantee admission. Denial of admission does not necessarily imply a negative evaluation of 
an applicant's qualification. Limited space, facilities, funding and mismatch in interest areas; H 
may place limits on the number of students admitted. 

Unconditional Admission 

! KI 

The minimum admission requirements for Ph.D. program are as follows: ; w 

1 . The student seeking a Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Electrical Engineering at North m 
Carolina A&T State University must possess a Master of Science Degree in Electrical | 
Engineering, Computer Engineering, or related disciplines; 

2. The applicant should have an overall graduate GPA of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 scale; 

3. The applicant must submit his/her GRE scores to the Department of Electrical and Com 
puter Engineering; 

4. The application must include three letters of recommendations, one of which must come 
from an individual knowledgeable of student's graduate performance and potential. The 
recommendations must be sent directly to the Department of Electrical and Computer 
Engineering in sealed envelopes; 

5. International students from non-English speaking countries must submit TOEFL score of j 
550 or better. 



Provisional Admission 

Applicants may be granted provisional admission if they do not qualify for unconditional 
admission due to one or more of the following reasons: 

a) Applicant does not have a 3.0 overall GPA on his/her master degree. (Note: Applicant 
must have at least a 3.0 overall graduate GPA). 

b) Applicant's application package is incomplete. 

However, the applicant must submit his/her GRE score to the Department of Electrical 
and Computer Engineering. The student in the provisional admission criteria must gain 3.5 
GPA after 12 credit hours earned in less than a year. The status will then be changed to uncon- 
ditional by requesting such change through the Graduate Coordinator. 

MASTER DEGREE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

PROGRAM OPTIONS AND CREDIT-HOUR REQUIREMENTS 

The Master of Science in Electrical Engineering program consists of three options: (a) 
Thesis Option, (b) Project Option, and (c) Course Only Option. The Thesis Option requires a 
minimum of 24 hours of coursework, at least 1 hour of 792, and 6 credit hours of master's 
thesis 797. 



144 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



.id' 



The Project Option requires a minimum of 30 hours of coursework, at least 1 hour of 792, 
.id 3 hours of 796. 
M The Course Only Option requires 33 hours of coursework and at least 1 hour of 792. 

At least 12 credit hours for the thesis option and 15 credit hours for the project and course 
fiinly options must be at or above the 700 level. A maximum of 6 hours of coursework can be 
Silken outside the department, subject to approval by the student Advisory Committee. 

ELECTION OF ADVISOR 

At the beginning of the program, the student should meet with the department Graduate 
Coordinator for assignment of a temporary advisor. The temporary advisor will assist the student 
ii registration and course selection until the student selects a permanent advisor by mutual 
consent. Students should select a permanent advisor no later than 9 credit hours into the program. 
:i 

CHE GRADUATE PLAN OF STUDY FOR THE 
FASTER DEGREE PROGRAM 

The student must submit the Graduate Plan of Study with the advisor's signature for his/ 
er master degree program to the Department Office no later than the completion of 1 8 credit 
ours in the master degree program. Upon approval by the Graduate Coordinator in the Depart- 

iaent of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the Graduate Plan of Study becomes the student's 

official guide to completing his/her master degree program. 

:hange of advisor and study plan 

The student can change his/her advisor at any time through mutual understanding between 
he student and a faculty member. However, after the submission of the Graduate Plan of Study, 
he student must submit the Graduate Study Plan Change Form with the signature of his/her 
idvisor in case of changing the student's study plan and with both signatures of the previous 
idvisor and the new advisor in case of changing advisor to the Department Office for approval 
m the Graduate Coordinator in the department. In particular, in the case of changing the student's 
idvisor, the student must submit the revised Graduate Plan of Study with the signature of the 
lew advisor. 

IHE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

The advisor together with the student will form the Advisory Committee for his/her thesis/ 
project at least two weeks before the thesis/project defense. In general, the student's committee 
vill have a minimum of three members for the thesis option and of two members for the project 
pption. The chair of the Advisory Committee must be a faculty member in the Department of 
.Electrical and Computer Engineering. It is expected that members will be selected such that 
; hey have both the time and the interest to assist the particular student. Only less than half of 
he committee members can be selected from outside of the department. A co-advisor can be 
selected from outside of the department for the student Advisory Committee. A co-advisor is 
responsible for the student's research work and financial support in a spirit of cooperation with 
he main advisor in the department. The main advisor is responsible for advising the overall 
olan of the student's degree program. However, a co-advisor from outside of department must 
ipply in writing and be approved by the Graduate Curriculum Development (GCD) Committee 
in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 145 



THESIS/PROJECT ORAL DEFENSE 

The student must present his/her thesis/project work to the Advisory Committee for th 
thesis or project oral defense. In order to schedule the thesis/project oral defense, the studen 
must submit the Thesis/Project Defense Notification with the signatures of all members of th< 
Advisory Committee to the Department Office at least two weeks prior to the date of the orai 
defense. This notification must include the date, time and place of the oral defense. The studen! CR 
requesting his/her oral defense must distribute a copy of the thesis/project to all members o 
committee two weeks prior to the date of the oral defense. The copy of the defense notification 
approved by the Graduate Coordinator should to be sent to the student and the members of the I 
committee from the Department Office for confirming the approval, date and place. The thesis 
project oral defense must be conducted by the student's Advisory Committee with the approva 
of the Department Graduate Coordinator. Thus, if a committee member cannot attend a sched 
uled oral defense, it must be rescheduled. The location of a thesis/project oral defense must be 
on-campus so that the presentation will be accessible to faculty, staff and students. 



[f. 



SUBMISSION OF THESIS/PROJECT 

Upon passing the thesis/project oral defense, the student must have the thesis approved b> 
the student's advisor and the chairman of Electrical and Computer Engineering Department 
The thesis must be submitted to the School of Graduate Studies by the deadline given in th^ 
academic calendar, and must conform to the Guide for Preparation of Thesis, a copy of which 
may be obtained from the School of Graduate Studies Office or the Department Office. The 
student's project report for the project option must be submitted to the Electrical Engineering 
Office to change the grade report for the project course taken under his/her advisor. 



SUMMARY OF PROCEDURES FOR THE MASTERS DEGREE PROGRAM 

1 . Apply for admission 

(a) Complete application form. 

(b) Pay application fee. 

(c) Request and present all necessary official transcripts. 

2. Receive Admission Status from the School of Graduate Studies. 

3 . See Graduate Coordinator for appointment of a temporary advisor. 

4. Prepare course schedule for first term. 

5. Complete all course deficiencies, if necessary. 

6 . Select permanent advisor, obtain advisor 's approval and approval of Graduate Coordinator. 

7. Consult with advisor to complete the Graduate Plan of Study for the master program. 

8 . Have the Graduate Plan of Study approved by advisor and Graduate Coordinator for his/ 
her master program, and place on file with EE department office. 

9. Complete course work. 

10. Forming the Advisory Committee. 

1 1 . Schedule and complete: 

(a) Final exam - if required *(See Note) 

(b) Thesis/Project presentation and defense. 

12. Gain approvals for the completion of all work. 

1 3 . Transmit the above information as necessary to 

(a) School of Graduate Studies 

(b) EE department office 

14. Graduate 

There may be circumstances where the Advisory Committee will deem it necessary and in 
the best interest of the student to require a written and oral final exam. Such circumstances 



146 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



may occur when a student has a handicap, when the research or project presented has 
unusual scope, or when other, not readily available talent, is needed to assess the student's 
results. 

DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 
i 
CREDIT-HOUR REQUIREMENTS 

The Ph.D. program in Electrical Engineering is based on the Dissertation Option. This 
Srogram requires 24 credit hours of coursework. At least 12 credit hours must be at the 800 
'evel. A minimum of 12 credit hours of doctoral dissertation 997, 3 hours of 992 and 6 hours of 
'95 are required. No more than 6 credit hours at the graduate level in an area outside of electri- 
cal engineering will be accepted to satisfy a graduate area concentration as defined in section-9. 
Thus, total 45 credit hours are required for the doctoral degree. The student should be encour- 
aged to take all courses related to the subjects selected for his/her qualifying exam. 

DISSERTATION RESEARCH 

There is no limit to the maximum number of dissertation credits for Ph.D. students. How- 
ever, no more than 12 dissertation credits will be counted toward the 45 credit hours require- 
ment described above. These credits alone do not constitute sufficient work at the dissertation/ 
esearch level. Dissertation research cannot be initiated unless a student has maintained a 3.0 

iverage or better. 

i 

SELECTION OF ADVISOR 

At the beginning of the first semester, student must meet with Graduate Coordinator for 
ihe assignment of an advisor in the area of interest to the student. The advisor will then assist 
.tudent with registration and course selection. By the end of the first semester or the first 9 
credit hours, a permanent advisor must be identified. 

DOCTORAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

The advisor and the advisee must form the Advisory Committee in the second semester or 
oefore the student completes 12 hours of course work. The Advisory Committee for a Ph.D. 
student consists of a chairperson, three other members from the Department of Electrical and 
Computer Engineering for major subjects, and one member from outside of the department for 
j| university minor subject. This Advisory Committee must include a Graduate School Repre- 
sentative selected from outside of the department in an area not related to the student's thesis 
;area. The Graduate School Representative will be appointed by the School of Graduate Studies 
for monitoring the fair evaluation of the exams for the student's degree program. The Graduate 
School Representative attends the final oral examination and must sign the reports of the ex- 
amination, but does not otherwise participate in directing the student's technical work. The 
thair must be selected from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering based on 
the area of emphasis chosen by the student. Only less than half of the committee members may 
be selected from outside of the department. A co-advisor can be selected from outside of the 
department for the student Advisory Committee. A co-advisor is responsible for the student's 
research work and financial support in a spirit of cooperation with the main advisor in the 
department. The main advisor is responsible for advising the overall plan of the student's de- 
gree program. However, a co-advisor from outside of department must apply in writing and be 
approved by the Graduate Curriculum Development (GCD) Committee in the Department of 
Electrical and Computer Engineering. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 147 



THE GRADUATE PLAN OF STUDY FOR DOCTORAL PROGRAM 

Before the student completes 12 credit hours of course work, the student and his/her advi 
sor together must work out the Graduate Plan of Study for the student's doctoral program ancj 9 
submit it with signatures of all members of the Advisory Committee to the Department Office 
If the 1 2 credits are completed at the end of a regular semester, the Graduate Plan of Study mus 
be submitted no later than one week before the beginning of pre-registration for the following 
semester. If the 15 credits are completed at the end of a summer session, the Graduate Plan ol 
Study must be submitted before registration day for the following semester. The Graduate Plar! ' 
of Study shows the committee chairperson, other committee members, and a sequential list oi ^ 
courses approved by the student's advisor. Each member's signature on the Graduate Plan ol 
Study denotes their approval for the plan of the student's doctoral program. Upon approval by! tl 
the Graduate Coordinator in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the Gradu 
ate Plan of Study becomes the student's official guide to complete his/her doctoral program, 
and the listed individuals form the Ph.D. Advisory Committee. However, the dissertation re 
search work cannot be initiated unless student has maintained a 3.0 GPA average or better. 



RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

Each Ph.D. student must secure at least two residence credits through registration in con- 
tinuous semesters at North Carolina A&T State University. Residence credit is determined from 
the number of semester hours completed during a regular semester according to the following 
table. Summer registration is not required. However, residence credit for a six- week summer 
session equals one-half that of a regular semester. For example, completing a three-credit course, 1 
during a six-week summer session will earn 1/6 of a regular semester residence credit. 

Semester Credit Hours Residence Credits 

9 or more 1 

6-8 2/3 

less than 6 1/3 

(including registration for "Thesis" 

\ 
CHANGE OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND STUDY PLAN 

The student can change advisor at any time through mutual understanding between the 
student and a faculty member. If current Graduate Plan of Study has been previously approved 
and submitted, the student must submit the Graduate Study Plan Change Form to the Depart- 
ment Office of Electrical and Computer Engineering for approval by Graduate Coordinator 
with signatures of all Advisory Committee members in case of changing the course list, and 
with signatures of both the previous Advisory Committee members and the new advisory group 
in case of changing any committee members. In the case of changing the student's advisor, the 
student must submit the revised Graduate Plan of Study with signatures of the new advisor and 
committee members. 

Ph.D. QUALIFYING EXAMINATION 

The purpose of the qualifying examination is to identify those who are qualified to work 
toward the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering by requiring them to demonstrate basic com- 
petence in a broad range of relevant subjects. Students are not expected to engage in their 
research until they have passed the exam. 

All students in the doctoral program must take the examination within two years plus one 
semester of his or her admission to the Ph.D. program. However, the students only with the 
unconditional status can apply the qualifying exam. Any students in the provisional status can 



A 



148 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



ot sit for the qualifying examination. They must first gain the unconditional status. A student 
rust be enrolled with a 3.0 GPA or better at the time of the examination. A student must also 
ave the approved Graduate Plan of Study for his/her doctoral program on file with the School 
f Graduate Studies prior to scheduling the exam. The qualifying examination is given each 
t ;gular (Fall and Spring) semester on two successive days during the week before the final 
Lxam period. A registration notice will be posted outside the Department Office in the middle 
|f each academic semester. Thus, the student must apply the qualifying exam two weeks prior 
) the date of exam. At the time of registration, the student will declare the track in which he or 
( he will be taking the exam. 

j The examination consists of a three-hour written examination per subject, two subjects 
, ( er day, and two consecutive days. 

} A student must obtain a score of at least 80 percent to pass the examination. The Graduate 
Coordinator will notify each examiner of his or her pass/fail by letter no later than three weeks 
,:om the date of exam. 

Upon recommendation of the student's academic advisor and the approval of the Graduate 
Curriculum Development (GCD) Committee in the department, a student who has failed the 
ualifying examination one time must take the examination in its entirety a second time within 
; year. A recommendation for a second examination must be submitted to the GCD Committee 
ii the Department of Electrical Engineering by the deadline given in the notification from the 
Graduate Coordinator. If a student passes the examination on the second attempt, all references 
h the first attempt will be removed from the student's record. 

No student will be permitted to take the qualifying examination more than twice. Students 
3 ot recommended for re-examination, or who fail the exam a second time are afforded the 
ipportunity to withdraw from the university. A student who chooses not to withdraw will have 
is or her graduate program terminated upon completing the semester in which the denial or 
econd failure occurs. 

A student who fails to take the examination or re-examination at the prescribed time shall 
e considered to have taken and failed the examination or re-examination. 

|»h.D. PRELIMINARY ORAL EXAMINATION 

Each Ph.D. student must take a preliminary oral examination conducted by the student's 
advisory Committee and attended by the Representative from the School of Graduate Studies. 
B'his is an oral presentation and defense of the student's dissertation proposal. Passing this 
-xam allows the School of Graduate Studies to enter the student into "PhD. Candidacy '." If a 
Tommittee member cannot attend a scheduled preliminary oral, it must be rescheduled. 
\ Unanimous approval by the Advisory Committee is required for passing the examination. 
(i!uch approval may be conditioned on satisfactory completion of additional work. A student is 
actually admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree only upon passing the preliminary exami- 
nation or upon fulfilling any additional requirements imposed in connection with a conditional 
»ass. 

Failure of the examination terminates the student's graduate study unless the student's 
advisory Committee unanimously recommends re-examination. Only one re-examination is 
lermitted and at least one full semester must elapse before the re-examination is held. 

The examination may be held no earlier than the end (final exam week) of the second year 
>f graduate study and no later than one semester (or four months) prior to the Ph.D. final oral 
xamination. 

The Preliminary Oral Examination is scheduled only at the request of the student and only 
ipon the approval of the student's Advisory Committee. A student cannot submit a request to 
chedule an oral examination unless the student's Graduate Plan of Study has been approved by 
he Graduate Coordinator and the student has passed the Qualifying Examination. The student 



' Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 1 49 



must be in good academic standing when the request is submitted and when the examination i 
held. The request must be submitted to the Department Office as soon as possible (after passing 
the Qualifying Examination), but at least two weeks prior to the date of the examination. 

Ph.D. FINAL ORAL EXAMINATION 

Each Ph.D. student must take a final oral examination conducted by the student's Advi 
sory Committee and attended by a Representative from the School of Graduate Studies. This is 
the final dissertation defense presentation scheduled after the dissertation is completed. It con 
sists of the defense of the methodology used and the conclusions reached in the research. If £ 
committee member cannot attend a scheduled final oral, it must be rescheduled. 

Unanimous approval by the Advisory Committee is required for passing an oral examina 
tion. Such approval may be conditioned on satisfactory completion of additional work. Failure 
of the examination terminates the student's graduate study unless the student's Advisory Com 
mittee unanimously recommends re-examination. Only one re-examination is permitted. 

The examination may be held no earlier than one semester (or four months) after admis 
sion to candidacy. The examination must be held on or before the deadline for final oral exami 
nations (see the academic calendar in the Graduate Catalog) if the degree is to be awarded ai 
the end of that semester, otherwise, the degree will be awarded at the end of the following 
semester. 

The examination is scheduled only upon the request of the student and the approval of his 01 
her Advisory Committee. The dissertation must be completed and copies of it must be distrib 
uted to the members of the Advisory Committee before the request to schedule the examination 
is submitted to the Electrical Engineering Department Graduate Office. The request must be \ 
submitted to the EE Graduate Office at least two weeks prior to the date of the examination 



• 



H 



SUBMISSION OF DISSERTATION 

Upon passing the Ph.D. Final Oral Examination, each Ph.D. student must have the disser 
tation approved by each member of the student's Advisory Committee. The dissertation mustL 
be submitted to the School of Graduate Studies by the deadline given in the academic calendar 
and must conform to the Guide For Preparation of Thesis and Dissertations, a copy of which 
may be obtained from the EE Office. Submission of the Dissertation to the School of Graduate 
Studies is by appointment only. 

SUMMARY OF PROCEDURES FOR THE DOCTORAL PROGRAM 

1 . Letter of inquiry from prospective student to the School of Graduate Studies or Depart- 
ment Chairperson. 

2. Mailing proper forms to the student. 

3. Receipt of application materials and required fee. 

4. Review of application materials by the Graduate Curriculum Development (GCD) Com 
mittee in the department. 

5. Department recommendation regarding applicant's admissibility to Graduate Dean. 

6. The department's recommendation is reviewed and the student is notified of the action 
taken by the Dean of Graduate School. 

7. Student reports to the department, is assigned an advisor and makes out a schedule offll. 
courses in consultation with Graduate Coordinator or the departmental advisor. 

8. The student's Advisory Committee will have at least five faculty members; three members! 
from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, one of whom should be the 
chair, another represents the university minor field from outside of the department. Thel 
Advisory Committee will be joined by a Graduate School Representative from outside of I 



1 50 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future, 



h 



1 the department not related with the student's thesis area in the Final Oral Examination. 

This Representative will sign the report of the examination, but is not a voting member. 
. The student in consultation with his/her Advisory Committee plans the course work in 

preparation of the Qualifying Examination. The student must submit the Plan of Doctoral 

Study to the department office before the Qualifying Examination with the approval of 

his/her Advisory Committee. 
jO. A dissertation subject and an outline of the proposed research are submitted to the student's 
: Advisory Committee. 

I . Four copies of the approved Graduate Plan of Study must be returned to the department 
office for approval at the end of the semester in which the student has completed 12 hours of 

I course work. One copy is kept on file in the Department Office, one is returned to the 

i committee chair, one is given to the student, and one is submitted the School of Graduate 
Studies. 

[2. After passing the Qualifying Examination, and when the direction of the student's disser- 
tation topic has been determined, the chairperson requests the scheduling of the Prelimi- 
nary Oral Exam at least two weeks prior to the suggested date. Upon approval of the 
request, a graduate faculty member is selected to represent the School of Graduate Studies 

i at the examination, and the student and examining committee are notified of the time and 
place. The report of the examination is sent to the School of Graduate Studies and if the 
examination has been passed without conditions, the student is admitted to candidacy. 

3 . A copy of the preliminary draft of the dissertation is submitted to the chair of the student's 
Advisory Committee for review. 

»4. The diploma order request form must be filed with the School of Graduate Studies by the 
end of the third week of the semester or summer session of anticipated graduation. Failure 
to submit the form by this date may result in the student's not receiving the diploma at 
graduation. 

i5 . At least two weeks prior to the Final Oral Examination, the chair of the student's Advisory 
Committee submits the dissertation to Advisory Committee members for review. 

6. The examination may be held no earlier than one semester (or four months) after admis- 
sion to candidacy. The examination is scheduled only upon the request of the student and 
the approval of his or her Advisory Committee. The dissertation must be completed and 
copies of it must be distributed to the members of the Advisory Committee before the 
request to schedule the examination is submitted to the Electrical Engineering Graduate 
Office. The request must be submitted to the EE Graduate Office at least two weeks prior 
to the date of the examination. Upon approval of the request, the student and the examin- 
ing committee, including a School of Graduate Studies representative, are notified of the 
time and place of the examination. The School of Graduate Studies Representative re- 
ceives a copy of the dissertation at least one week prior to the examination. 

7. Three copies of the dissertation signed by each member of the student's Advisory Com- 
mittee and five copies of the abstract must be submitted to the School of Graduate Studies 
by a specific deadline in the semester or summer session in which the degree is be con- 
ferred. Specific deadline dates appear in the Calendar. One copy of each of the University 
Microfilms Agreement and the Survey of Earned Doctorate forms must be submitted with 
the dissertation. 

8. The dissertation is reviewed by the School of Graduate Studies to insure that the format 
conforms to the specifications prescribed in the Guide for the Preparation of Theses. 

9. All course work scheduled in a graduate degree classification must be completed prior to 
graduation. 

.0. A grade point average of at least 3.5 is required for graduation. 

II. The statute of limitations for completion of degree requirements must not be exceeded 
(Refer to Section 12.2). 

Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 151 



SUMMARY OF COURSE OFFERINGS 

The 600 level courses numbered 600-699 are open to qualified seniors 
dents for master program. Courses numbered 700 and above are only open to 



COURSE # 

ELEN 602 
ELEN 606 
ELEN 608 
ELEN 610 
ELEN 614 
ELEN 615 
ELEN 621 
ELEN 622 
ELEN 623 
ELEN 624 
ELEN 629 
ELEN 630 
ELEN 647 
ELEN 650 
ELEN 651 
ELEN 656 
ELEN 657 
ELEN 661 
ELEN 662 
ELEN 668 
ELEN 669 
ELEN 674 
ELEN 678 
ELEN 679 
ELEN 685 
ELEN 686 
ELEN 701 
ELEN 710 

ELEN 720 
ELEN 721 
ELEN 723 
ELEN 724 
ELEN 727 
ELEN 749 
ELEN 752 
ELEN 762 
ELEN 764 
ELEN 785 
ELEN 792 
ELEN 793 
ELEN 794 
ELEN 796 
ELEN 797 
ELEN 799 



152 



DESCRIPTION 

Semiconductor Theory and Devices 

Digital Electronics 

Analog Electronics 

Power Electronics 

Integrated Circuit Fabrication Methods 

Silicon Device Fabrication Laboratory 

Embedded Systems Design 

Embedded Systems Design Laboratory 

Digital Systems 

Computer Organization and Architecture Design 

VLSI Circuit Design 

VLSI Design Laboratory 

Introduction to Telecommunication Networks 

Digital Signal Processing I 

Digital Signal Processing Laboratory 

Probability and Random Processes 

Image Processing 

Power Systems Analysis 

Advanced Power Systems Laboratory 

Automatic Control Theory 

Control Laboratory 

Genetic Algorithms 

Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks 

Machine Intelligence Laboratory 

Selected Topics in Engineering 

Special Projects Var. 

Electronic Ceramics 

Wave and Fields in Radio Frequency (RF) 

and Optoelectronics 

Theoretical Issue in Computer Engineering 

Fault-Tolerant Digital System Design 

System Design Using Programmable Logic Devices 

Mixed-Signal VLSI Design 

Switching and Finite Automata Theory 

Digital Communications 

Wireless Information Networks 

Network Matrices and Graphs 

Power System Planning 

Master Special Topics 

Master Seminar 

Master Supervised Teaching 

Master Supervised Research 

Master Project 

Master Thesis 

Masters Thesis Continuation 



and graduate stu^ I 
graduate students 1 

CREDIT 1 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
2 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
2 
3 
3 
2 
3 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
Var. 
1 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Solid State Devices 

Advanced Solid State Theory 

Compound Semiconductor Materials and Devices 

Semiconductor Material and Device Characterization 

Thin Film Technology for Device Fabrication 

Theory and Techniques in Photonics 

Advanced Computer Organization and Architecture 

Error-Correcting Codes 

Advanced VLSI Design 

Telecommunication Networks 

Information Theory 

Data Communications 

Digital Signal Processing II 

Pattern Recognition 

Power System Control and Protection 

Computer Methods in Power Systems 

Theory of Linear Systems 

Discrete Time Systems 

Neural Networks Design 

Intelligent Methods for Control Systems 

Machine Vision for Intelligent-Robotics 

Fuzzy Logic with Applications 

Nonlinear Control Systems 

Doctoral Special Topics 

Doctoral Seminar 

Doctoral Supervised Teaching 

Doctoral Supervised Research 

Doctoral Preliminary Examination 

Doctoral Dissertation 

Doctoral Dissertation Continuation 



3( 


3-0) 


31 


3-0) 


3| 


3-0) 


31 


3-3) 


31 


'3-0) 


3( 


3-0) 


31 


3-0) 


3( 


3-0) 


3 


3-0) 


3 


3-0) 


3| 


3-0) 


31 


3-0) 


3< 


3-0) 


3< 


3-0) 


3 


3-0) 


3 


3-0) 


3 


3-0) 


3 


3-0) 


3 


3-0) 


3 


3-0) 


3 


3-0) 


3 


3-0) 


3 


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1 (0-1) 



DESCRIPTION OF GRADUATE COURSES 

Under the Master and Doctoral Degree Programs in 
Electrical and Computer Engineering 

LEN-602. Semiconductor Theory and Devices Credit 3 (3-0) 

his course is a study of the phenomena of solid-state conduction and devices using band 
lodels, excess carriers in semiconductors, p-n junctions, and devices. Prerequisite: ELEN-460 
r consent of instructor. 

LEN-606. Digital Electronics Credit 3 (3-0) 

ibis course covers analysis, design and applications of digital integrated circuits. These cir- 
uits may include resistor-transistor logic (RTL), diode transistor logic (DTL), 
ansistor-transistor (TTL), emitter-coupled logic (ECL), metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) 
ates and n-channel MOS (NMOS) logic, complementary MOS (CMOS) logic, Bipolar CMOS 
iiCMOS) structures, memory circuits, and interfacing circuits. Prerequisite: ELEN-460 or 
Dnsent of instructor. 



ncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



153 



ELEN-608. Analog Electronics Credit 3 (3-0)j 1 

This course covers the analysis, design and application of analog integrated circuits. Thesq ^ 
circuits may include operational amplifiers, voltage comparators, voltage regulators, Integrated, gj 
Circuit (IC) power amplifiers, Digital to Analog (D/A) and Analog to Digital (A/D) converters,! | 
voltage-controlled oscillators, phase-locked loops, other special-function integrated circuits 
Prerequisite: ELEN-460 or consent of instructor. 

II 
ELEN-610 Power Electronics Credit 3 (3-0> | 

This course is an introduction to principles and methods of power electronics. Subjects cov-| ^ 
ered are semiconductor devices and their complementary components and systems, different 
static switching converters like AC to DC, AC to AC, DC to DC and DC to AC converters and U 
their applications. Prerequisite: ELEN-320 or consent of instructor. 

ELEN-614. Integrated Circuit Fabrication Methods Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course presents the various processes utilized in the fabrication of semiconductor int€H | 
grated circuits. Oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, metallization, and epitaxial processes 
will be discussed. Limits on device design and performance will be considered. Prerequisite: 
ELEN-470 or consent of instructor. U 

h 

ELEN-615. Silicon Device Fabrication Laboratory Credit 2 (1-3) 

Laboratory experiments in the fabrication of silicon p-n junction diodes, MOS capacitors and I 
MOS field effect transistors will be performed. Oxidation, diffusion, photolithography, and 
metallization techniques will be presented. Co-requisite: ELEN-614 



ELEN-621. Embedded Systems Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a survey of modern methods for specifying algorithms, simulating systems, and 
mapping specifications onto embedded systems. It presents an introduction to the technologies used 
in the design and implementation of programmable embedded systems, such as programmable 
processors, cores, memories, dedicated and configurable hardware, software tools, schedulers, code 
generators, and system- level design tools. Prerequisite: ELEN-427 or consent of instructor. 

ELEN-622. Embedded Systems Design Laboratory Credit 2 (1-3) 

This laboratory course is an introduction to developing processor-based embedded systems. 
The development tools include a C++ cross compiler, an Electronically Programmable Read 
Only Memory (EPROM) and an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) programmer. 
A student project is part of the laboratory requirements. Co-requisite: ELEN-621. 

ELEN-623. Digital Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

Digital system top-down design and analysis will be presented. Topics include timing, power 
and performance issues in digital circuits, Very High Speed Integrated Circuit Hardware De- 
scription Language (VHDL)-based system analysis and synthesis, hardware-software co design, 
data-flow models and digital system primitives. Prerequisite: ELEN-427 or consent of instructor. 

ELEN-624. Computer Organization and Architecture Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers the design of modern uniprocessors and their memory, and Input/Output 
(I/O) subsystems. Performance, microarchitecture, and design philosophies used to realize pipe- 
line, superscalar, Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) and Complete Instruction Set 
Computer (CISC) processors will be studied. Prerequisite: ELEN-427 or consent of instructor. 



ELEN-629. VLSI Circuit Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will study CMOS technology and device characteristics in order to develop layout 
design rules for VLSI circuit building blocks, such as inverters and logic gates. Layout tech- 
niques for complex gates and designing combinational and sequential logic circuits will be 
introduced. Prerequisite: ELEN-427 or consent of instructor. 

154 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



hi 



ta 



fii 



k 



'LEN-630. VLSI Design Laboratory Credit 2 (1-3) 

'his is an introduction of Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools for integrated circuit design 
! id verification. These CAD tools include; geometric pattern generators, design rule checkers, 
? ircuit simulators and Programmable Logic Array (PLA) generators. A student design project 
i part of the laboratory requirements. Co-requisite: ELEN-629. 
| 

LEN-647. Introduction to Telecommunication Networks Credit 3 (3-0) 

'his course introduces telecommunication networks utilization and design. Emphasis is on 

sing and designing voice, video and image digital networks. Prerequisite: ELEN-400. 
i 
)LEN-650. Digital Signal Processing I Credit 3 (3-0) 

his course develops a working knowledge of the basic signal processing functions, such as 
igital filtering spectral analysis, and detection/post-detection processing. Methods of generat- 
ig the coefficients for digital filters will be derived. Alternate structures for filters, such as 
"finite impulse response and finite impulse response will be compared. The effect of finite 
Agister length will be covered. Prerequisite: ELEN-400 or consent of instructor. 

LEN-651. Digital Signal Processing Laboratory Credit 2 (1-3) 

xperiments and student projects will be performed which are related to the practical applica- 
ons of digital signal processing techniques to data acquisition, digital filtering, control, spectral 
halysis and communications. Co-requisite: ELEN-650. 

LEN-656. Probability and Random Processes Credit 3 (3-0) 

his course covers probability, random variables, random processes, Gaussian processes, proba- 
'listic description of signals and noise, including joint, marginal and conditional densities, 
] titocorrelation, cross-correlation and power spectral density; linear and nonlinear transforma- 
Dns; linear least-squares estimation, and signal detection. Prerequisite: ELEN-310 or consent 
&? instructor. 

LEN-657. Image Processing Credit 3 (3-0) 

his course deals with concepts and techniques for digital image analysis and processing. Top- 

s include image representation, image enhancement, edge extraction, image segmentation, 

Geometric structure, feature extraction, knowledge representation, and image understanding. 

3 irerequisite: ELEN-400 or consent of instructor. 
i 

LEN-658. Digital Image Processing Laboratory Credit 2 (1-3) 

his laboratory course will demonstrate many important and practical applications of digital 
Inage processing techniques. The experiments include image enhancement, feature extraction, 
'oough transform, various transforms in spatial and frequency domains, image understanding 
id quantization. Co-requisite: ELEN-657. 

tLEN-661. Power Systems Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

he course studies power system representation, transmission lines, symmetrical and asym- 
metrical faults, electric power flow, power systems control and stability. Prerequisite: ELEN-430. 

LEN-662. Advanced Power Systems Laboratory Credit 2 (1-3) 

j i this laboratory course, basic concepts, transmission lines, power flows, faults, and transient 
iid steady-state stability will be investigated. Prerequisite: ELEN-436 or consent of instructor, 
o-requisite: ELEN-661. 

I LEN-668. Automatic Control Theory Credit 3 (3-0) 

-his course introduces the theory of linear systems represented by state equations. Topics include 
5 urdan canonical form, solutions to state equations, relationship to transfer functions, stability, con- 
ollability, and pole placement design. Prerequisite: ELEN-410 or consent of instructor. 



^.compromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 1 55 



ELEN-669. Control Laboratory Credit 2 (1-3) 

This laboratory course demonstrates methods of system identification and control. Verifica 
tions of control system designs in both the time domain and frequency domain will be studied 
Co-requisite: ELEN-661. 

ELEN-674. Genetic Algorithms Credit 3 (3-0 J* 

This course covers the theory and application of genetic algorithms. Genetic algorithms com 
bine a Darwinian survival-of-the-fittest with a randomized, yet structured, information exchange f 
to form an improved search mechanism with surprising robustness. Engineering application^ 
of genetic algorithms for design and control will be presented. Prerequisite: ELEN-410 or 

consent of instructor. 

llE 
ELEN-678. Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks Credit 3 (3-0) f 

This course introduces neural network design and development. Emphasis is on designing and 
implementing information processing systems that autonomously develop operational capa- f 
bilities in adaptive response to an information environment. Prerequisite: ELEN-400 or consent 
of instructor. 



is 



ELEN-679. Machine Intelligence Laboratory Credit 2 (1-3) 

This laboratory will explore the design and development of intelligent, autonomous, and physical 
agents. An emphasis will be placed upon machine intelligence experiments with visual sen 
sors, tactile sensors, robotic manipulators and autonomous inexpensive mobile robots 
Prerequisite: ELEN-433 or consent of instructor. Co-requisite: ELEN-678. 

ELEN-685. Selected Topics in Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

This lecture course is used to introduce engineering topics of current interest to students and 
faculty. The subject matter will be identified before the beginning of the course. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. 

ELEN-686. Special Projects Variable Credit (1- 

This is an investigation of an engineering topic which is arranged between a student and ai 
faculty advisor. Project topics may be analytical and/or experimental and should encourage 
independent study. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 



ELEN-701. Electronic Ceramics Credit 3 (3-0) fe 

This course introduces the properties of ceramic materials in electronic applications. The ef- 
fects of processing parameters on the ultimate device characteristics will be investigated 
Prerequisite: ELEN-602 or consent of instructor. L 

f 

ELEN-710. Wave and Fields in Radio Frequency (RF) and 

Optoelectronics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course emphasizes principles, phenomena and methods relevant to RF and lightwave tech- 
nology. The topics will include basic electromagnetic propagation in free space and material | 
media, guided electromagnetic waves, modes and mode coupling, and Bragg and other types of 
scattering. This course will establish the field principles of RF, integrated optic and fiber based 
devices and circuits. Prerequisite: ELEN-450 or ELEN-470 or consent of instructor. 

ELEN-720. Theoretical Issues in Computer Engineering Credit 3 (3-ffl || 

This course is designed to introduce some basic theoretical aspects of computer engineering. It 
includes selected topics in the set theory, elements of algebra such as semigroups, monoids, 
groups, rings, and fields, quotient groups and homomorphism theorems. It also includes finite 
state machines, the Myhill-Nerode theory, pseudo/random generators, linear feed back regis- 



156 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Srs, introduction to error correcting codes and Turing Machines. Various applications will be 
fijmonstrated. Prerequisite: ELEN-427 or consent of instructor. 

LEN-721. Fault-Tolerant Digital System Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

his course covers reliability, test generation, self-checking techniques, principles and appli- 
flitions of fault-tolerant design techniques. Prerequisite: ELEN-625 or consent of instructor. 

,LEN-723. System Design Using Programmable Logic Devices Credit 3 (3-0) 

.his course will cover and compare many commercially available Programmable Logic De- 
ces and consider their applications in both combinational and sequential logic system design, 
tudents will also be familiarized with hardware description language such as VHDL and 
BELTM and shown how design ideas can be efficiently translated into programmable hard- 
tare implementations. Prerequisite: ELEN-623 or consent of instructor. 

fflEN-724. Mixed-Signal VLSI Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

,his course will introduce CMOS circuit techniques for low-power, low-voltage mixed-signal 
tegrated circuits. Continuous-time signal processing, sampled-data analog filters, deltasigma 
ita converters and mixed analog-digital layout techniques will be introduced. Prerequisite: 
5LEN-629 or consent of instructor. 

$,EN-727. Switching and Finite Automata Theory Credit 3 (3-0) 

,his course presents the abstract mathematical modeling of combinational and sequential switch- 
g networks. Finite automata theory and fault tolerant concepts with applications to both 
Dmbinational networks and finite state machines will be presented. Prerequisite: ELEN-427 
ft consent of instructor. 
i 
XEN-749. Digital Communications Credit 3 (3-0) 

he fundamental theory and applications of the digital communications system are discussed 
ised on the knowledge of the probability theory. Topics in digital communications include 
'impling, quantizing, coding, detection, modulation/ demodulation, signal-to-noise ratio, and 

!,xor probability. Prerequisite: ELEN-449 or consent of instructor. 

J 

LEN-752. Wireless Information Networks Credit 3 (3-0) 

iindamental theory and applications of wireless mobile communication systems are covered 
ta voice, data, and multimedia. Topics in wireless networks include characterization of radio 
1'opagation, source and channel coding, theory and analysis of wireless data networks, and 
tireless Local Area Networks (LANs). The wireless LANs discussion includes multiple ac- 
:ss techniques and computer simulation of radio channels. Prerequisite: ELEN-452 or consent 
'■. instructor. 

lLEN-762. Network Matrices and Graphs Credit 3 (3-0) 

'se of vector space techniques in the description, analysis and realization of networks mod- 
fed as matrices and graphs. The course investigates vector space concepts in the modeling and 
^udy of networks. The system concept of networks is introduced and explored as a dimen- 
tonal space consideration in terms of matrices and graphs. Prerequisite: ELEN-400 or equivalent. 

LEN-764. Power System Planning Credit 3 (3-0) 

lis course presents an overview of the issues and methods relevant to power systems plan- 
•ng. The course reviews the basics of financial analysis, regression analysis, forecasting, and 
liability. Special topics relevant to power systems, such as deregulation, peak-load forecasts, 
ad management and representation, and the loss-of-load probability (LOLP) method are also 
->nsidered. Prerequisite: ELEN-661 or consent of instructor. 



1 icompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 1 57 



ELEN-785. Master Special Topics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This lecture course is used to introduce engineering topics of current interest to master students 
and faculty. The subject matter will be identified before the beginning of the course. Prerequi- 
site: Consent of instructor. 

ELEN-792. Master Seminar Credit 1 (1-0) 

Discussions and reports of subjects in electrical engineering and allied fields will be presented. 
Prerequisite: Master level standing. 



:cii 



ELEN-793. Master Supervised Teaching Credit 3 (0-3) f 

Students will gain teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student to 
in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during ^ 
the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment. Prereq 
uisite: Master level standing. 

[2 

ELEN-794. Master Supervised Research Credit 3 (0-3) I 

This course is supervised research under the mentorship of a faculty member. It is not intended! 
to serve as the project or thesis topic of the master student. Prerequisite: Master level standing^ 
and consent of instructor. 

ELEN-796. Master Project Credit 3 (3-0) 

The student will conduct advanced research of interest to the student and the instructor. A I 

written proposal, which outlines the nature of the project, must be submitted for approval. This 1 is 

course is only available to project option students. Prerequisite: Master standing and consent ofis, 

instructor. lw 

Id 
ELEN-797. Master Thesis Credit Variable (3-6) 

Master of Science thesis research will be conducted under the supervision of the thesis com-|I 

mittee chairperson leading to the completion of the Master thesis. This course is only available 

to thesis option students. Prerequisite: Consent of advisor. 

ELEN-799. Masters Thesis Continuation Credit 1 (0-1) 

The course is for Master's students who have completed all required course works and all 
Master Project or Thesis credits. This optional course assists the student in maintaining full- 
time enrollment following completion of the Masters Project, ELEN-796 or Masters Thesis 
ELEN-797. The course may be taken to allow time for the student to complete the final projects i 
or thesis write-up and to prepare for the masters project or thesis defense. Prerequisite: Comple-i 
tion of all required course works and master project or thesis credits. 

ELEN-801. Solid State Devices Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course deals with p-n junction and Schottky barrier diodes, bipolar junction and field & 
effect transistors, heterostructure devices (e.g., heterojunction bipolar transistors and solar cells) 
and device modeling and simulation. Prerequisite: ELEN-602 or consent of instructor. '!( 



ELEN-802. Advanced Solid State Theory Credit 3 (3-0| 

This course presents the physical properties of solids, including crystal lattice structure, atomic 
bonding, the band theory of electronic conduction, carrier mobilities, and scattering mecha 
nisms. Prerequisite: ELEN-602 or consent of instructor. 

ELEN-803. Compound Semiconductor Materials and Devices Credit 3 (3-0 

This course presents the physics of compound semiconductors, epitaxial crystal growth, quan- 
tum well and superlattice devices, compound semiconductor FETs, and photonic devices 
Prerequisite: ELEN-602 or consent of instructor. 



158 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



1EN-804. Semiconductor Material and Device Characterization Credit 3 (3-0) 

is course covers electrical, optical, and physical/chemical characterization of semiconduc- 
. materials and devices. Laboratory demonstrations will be presented on selected 
aracterization techniques. Prerequisite: ELEN-602 or consent of instructor. 

1EN-805. Thin Film Technology for Device Fabrication Credit 3 (3-0) 

.is course will focus on the preparation and properties of thin film electronic materials (di- 
ctrics, metals, epitaxial layers). Topics will include: basic vacuum technology; theories of 
idensation, nucleation and growth of thin films; deposition techniques (chemical vapor depo- 
(on, vaporization, sputtering); epitaxial growth of semiconductor materials (molecular beam 
r;taxy, vapor phase epitaxy, liquid phase epitaxy); and applications of the deposition pre- 
sses to the fabrication of heterostructure devices. Prerequisite: ELEN-602 or consent of 
[tractor. 

LEN-810. Theory and Techniques in Photonics Credit 3 (3-0) 

{is course will concentrate on photonic materials such as semiconductors and oxide materials 
)i opto-electronic integrated optic and nonlinear optic guided wave devices such as lasers, 
ijtdulators and fibers. The course will also cover photonic systems for computing, communi- 
ions, sensing, and data acquisition, processing and storage. Prerequisites: ELEN-450 or 
IEN-470 and ELEN-602. 

lEN-821. Advanced Computer Organization and Architecture Credit 3 (3-0) 

IP course introduces the design and performance issues of array processors and multiproces- 
ffi. Very Long Instruction Word (VLrW), data-flow machines, array processors, interconnection 
tworks and memory structures will be discussed. Prerequisite: ELEN-624 or consent of in- 
iactor. 
I 

tLEN-822. Error-Correcting Codes Credit 3 (3-0) 

ijthis course, the basic principles of coding, such as error control schemes, coding in commu- 
tation systems, and block coding, are studied. Linear block codes, polynomial algebra and 
blic codes, block codes based on finite field arithmetic, convolution codes, coding for bursty 
Wiels, coding for bandwidth limited channels, codes for computer memories and error de- 
"tion and correction methods will be discussed. Prerequisite: ELEN-625. 

3 LEN-823. Advanced VLSI Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

sis course introduces the design of very high performance digital circuits, interconnect mod- 
jig, and packaging. Timing issues in digital circuits, designing memory and array structures, 
iiability and yield predictions, design synthesis, and validation and testing of VLSI circuits 

1.1 be discussed. Prerequisite: ELEN-629 or consent of instructor. 

« 

AEN-847. Telecommunication Networks Credit 3 (3-0) 

l| course familiarizes the student with the concepts of the International Standards Organiza- 
ii Open Systems Interconnection (ISO OSI) standards for the seven layer network model. 
is course introduces techniques for the analysis and optimization of computer networks, and 

Wrates some of the technical issues of current networks. Prerequisite: ELEN-647. 

J 

|EN-848. Information Theory Credit 3 (3-0) 

is course covers topics in classical information theory such as entropy, source coding, chan- 
coding and rate distortion theory. Several related topics are discusses, including entropy for 
Kjfkov sources and entropy for the extension of sources. Prerequisite: ELEN-749. 



J compromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 159 



ELEN-849. Data Communications Credit 3 (3-0 

This course is an extended study of digital communications. Various topics in the upper level o\ 
digital communications, such as channel coding, synchronization, multiplexing, multiple ac 
cess, and frequency spreading are discussed. Prerequisite: ELEN-749 or consent of instructor 



ELEN-850. Digital Signal Processing II Credit 3 (3-0] 

This course deals with advanced topics in digital signal processing. Topics include the 2-D 
sampling theorem, the 2-D z-transform, the 2-D discrete Fourier transform, 2-D filters, and 
computational structures for the implementation of multi-dimensional digital signal process 
ing algorithms. Prerequisite: ELEN-650 or consent of instructor. 



ELEN-857. Pattern Recognition Credit 3 (3-0] r 

This course covers classical topics in statistical decision function, Bayesian learning, erroL, 
probability estimation, cluster-seeking, and deterministic approach. Several related topics arej v 
discussed, including stochastic approximation, feature selection and ranking, syntactic and struc- 
tural pattern recognition. Prerequisite: ELEN-657. 



'Ii 



to 



i pi 



ELEN-861 . Power System Control and Protection Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course deals with power and voltage control systems, and power systems protection by 

relays. Related topics are also covered. Prerequisite: ELEN-661 or ELEN-668. 

i act 

ELEN-862. Computer Methods in Power Systems Credit 3 (3-0jcal 

This course deals with commercially available software for modeling and analysis of electridam 

power systems. Prerequisite: ELEN-661 or equivalent. 

,li 

ELEN-865. Theory of Linear Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course introduces modern control system design and analysis. Topics include linear' 
quadratic regulators, state estimators, and discrete-time control systems. Issues discussed included 
stability, robustness, and optimality. Prerequisite: ELEN-668 or equivalent. 

ELEN-866. Discrete Time Systems Credit 3 (3-0) II 

In this course, analyses and syntheses of discrete time systems are carried out using Z-nis 
transform and state variable representations. The controllability and observability, stability iter 
criteria, sampled spectral densities and correlation sequence, optimum filtering and control 
random processes are discussed. Prerequisite: ELEN-668 or equivalent. 

ELEN-867. Neural Networks Design Credit 3 (3-0) tii 

This course covers the design of neural network systems using CMAC (Cerebellum Model sac 
Articulation Controller), back propagation, and multifunction hybrid networks. Prerequisite: 
ELEN-678 or equivalent. 



ELEN-868. Intelligent Methods for Control Systems Credit 3 (3-0 

The course covers advanced control methods for dynamic systems. The focus will be on intelli- 
gent control algorithms, and adaptive and self-learning methods. Stability analysis anq^ 
performance simulation will also be addressed. Prerequisite: ELEN-668 or consent of instructor 



ELEN-869. Machine Vision for Intelligent-Robotics Credit 3 (3 

This course is a study of visual/non-visual sensor technologies for the intelligent control of alio* 
robot. The course will cover image understanding, non-contact sensor analysis, and data fusioi on 
for intelligent robotics system design. Prerequisite: ELEN-657. 

ELEN-870. Fuzzy Logic With Applications Credit 3 (3-0 

The course objective is to understand the basic theory and the foundations of fuzzy sets. Fuzz] 
logic is shown to contain evidence, possibility, and probability logic. This course emphasize 



1 60 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Futur 



ISSt 



u 



-ne 



ugineering applications in control, decision-making, and pattern recognition. The hardware/ 
I tftware implementation of those applications is also demonstrated. Prerequisite: ELEN-668 
| consent of instructor. 

jjLEN-871. Nonlinear Control Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

diis course explores the basic issues of nonlinear system analysis and control. The course will 
rlitroduce the general characteristics of nonlinear behavior and some of the tools needed to 

lalyze and understand them. It will also introduce basic concepts of stability theory, espe- 
cially Lyaunov's. Some basic design techniques for the control of these systems, such as the 

tiding mode method and feedback linearization will be introduced. Prerequisite: ELEN-668 
| consent of instructor. 

'LEN-885. Doctoral Special Topics Credit 3 (3-0) 

pis lecture course is used to introduce engineering topics of current interest to doctoral stu- 
isnts and faculty. The subject matter will be identified before the beginning of the course, 
^requisites: Doctoral student and consent of instructor. 

JLEN-992. Doctoral Seminar Credit 1 (0-1) 

J this course, doctoral students attend colloquia or seminars. These consist of presentations by 
octoral students on dissertation topics and works-in-progress and by guests on important Clas- 
cal, contemporary or research problems in electrical engineering. Prerequisite: Doctoral level 
banding. 

LEN-993. Doctoral Supervised Teaching Credit 3(0-3) 

Undents will gain teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student 
j planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during 
je teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment. Prereq- 
ssite: Doctoral level standing. 

(LEN-994. Doctoral Supervised Research Credit 3 (0-3) 

jtiis is supervised research under the mentorship of a member of the graduate faculty. It is not 
[[.tended to serve as the dissertation topic of the doctoral student. Prerequisites: Doctoral level 
Handing and consent of instructor. 

EEN-995. Doctoral Preliminary Examination Credit 3 (0-3) 

lihis course is for students who are preparing for and taking the written and/oral preliminary 
(lamination. Prerequisites: Doctoral student and consent of advisor. 

JLEN-997. Doctoral Dissertation Variable Credit (3-12) 

ihis supervised research serves as the dissertation of the doctoral student. Twelve credits of 
Isssertation are required for graduation. Prerequisites: Doctoral student and consent of advisor. 

|LEN-999. Doctoral Dissertation Continuation Credit 1 (0-1) 

jhe course is for doctoral students who have completed all required course works and all 
issertation credits. This optional course assists the student in maintaining full-time enrollment 
Billowing completion of the Doctoral Dissertation, ELEN-997. The course may be taken to 
I low time for the student to complete the dissertation write-up and to prepare for the disserta- 
:on defense. Prerequisite: Completion of all required course works and dissertation credits. 



ncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 161 



Electronics, Computer, and Information Technology 



http://www.ncat.edu/~ecit 
Derrek B. Dunn, Chairperson 

OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Electronics, Computer, and Information Technology (ECIT) prepare 
students to pursue technical, as well as technical management careers in all employment sec- 
tors. The program emphasizes acquisition of sound theoretical studies, as well as intensive 
"hands-on" experiences in the area of electronics technology. The ECIT Department empha- 
sizes development of "real world" competencies demanded by employers. Students receiv 
thorough grounding in electronics; digital and microprocessor systems; computer technolo 
gies, including hardware, software and computer networking; communication systems; am 
automation and control systems. Additional emphasis is placed on courses in business manage-j 
ment, statistics, and project management. Such courses instill an appreciation for the economic 
and managerial aspects of the business enterprise. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Information Technology - Master of Science in Industrial Technology 

Electronics and Computer Technology - Master of Science in Industrial Technology 

CERTIFICATE IN RADIO FREQUENCY & MICROWAVE WIRELESS 
COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS 

The Department of Electronics, Computer, and Information Technology administers the 
Certificate in Radio Frequency and Microwave Wireless Communication Systems. The certifi- 
cate program in Radio Frequency and Microwave Wireless Communication Systems requires : 
total of 15 semester hours to complete. Under the supervision of a certificate faculty advisor.; 
students will take 6 credits of required core courses, select 6 credits hours of elective course^ 
and complete a required 3 credit hour independent study focusing on one or more selected 
wireless topics. The 3 credit hours of independent study would assure that the certificate pro-i 
gram maintains a certain level of "hands-on" training by requiring students to complete a project. 
(Note: Upon departmental certificate advisor approval, substitutions may be allowed for courses 
not on the list below, if consistent with the certificate's intent.) 

Required Core Courses (6 hours): ECT 650 and 665 

Elective Courses (6 hours): ECT 634, 655, 660, 670, 675, 680, and 690 

Required Project Course (3 hours): ECT 699 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The School of Technology at North Carolina A&T State University offers a Master of Sci- 
ence in Industrial Technology (MSIT) degree. This program is designed to increase students' 
understanding of industrial management challenges in an array of technical areas and to ex- 
plore effective methods for dealing with accelerated technological change. 



162 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS 

The Master of Science in Industrial Technology degree program with concentrations in 
Information Technology or Electronics and Computer Technology offers three options: the 

! thesis option, the project option and the course work option. The thesis option requires a mini- 
mum of 36 semester hours. The project option requires a minimum of 39 semester hours. The 
course work option requires a minimum of 42 semester hours. All options required students to 

i pass a written comprehensive examination. In addition, at least fifty percent (50%) of the courses 
counted towards the Master of Science in Industrial Technology degree must be numbered 700 

i and above and students must maintain and complete the Master of Science in Industrial Tech- 

[i nology program with an overall GPA of 3 .0 or better on a scale of 4.0. Up to six semester hours 

i of graduate work may be transferred from another university, provided it was not a part of any 
prior undergraduate degree requirement. The course content must adequately replace current 

{ graduate offerings in the student's curriculum. Transfer credits should be at a level comparable 

: to 600 or 700 level courses at North Carolina A&T. 

PROGRAM CURRICULA 



Program 


Option 


Core 
Courses 


Management 
Electives 


Additional 

Statistics 

Requirement 


Technical 
Electives 


Comprehensive 

Examination 

Course 


Required 

Courses 


Electronics and 
Computer 
Technology 


Thesis 


12 credits 


6 credits 


3 credits 


9 credits 


Required 


6 credits 


Project 


9 credits 


9 credits 


Coursework 


21 credits 




Information 
Technology 


Thesis 


12 credits 


6 credits 


3 credits 


9 credits 


Required 


6 credits 


Project 


9 credits 


9 credits 


Coursework 


21 credits 





Core Courses 

MSIT 610 Problem Solving in Industrial Technology 

MSIT 700 Concepts of Technological Innovations 

MSIT 740 Leadership Development Seminar 

MSIT 779 Statistical and Research Methods in Industrial Technology I 



Management Electives 

ECT 730 Systems Integration for Telecommunications Managers 

ECT 735 Telecommunications Management Issues 

ECT 785 Electric Energy and Environmental Management 

ITT 620 Telecommunications Management 

ITT 625 Computer Database Management 

ITT 685 Ethical Aspects of Information Technology 

ITT 740 Regulatory and Policy Issues for Communication Systems 

Additional Statistics Requirement 

(Student is to select an additional statistics course from any SOT department or with prior 

approval, any NCA&TSU department) 

MSIT 780 Statistical and Research Methods in Industrial Technology II 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



163 



Technical Electives-Electronics and Computer Technology 

(Student is to select technical elective courses from any SOT department or with prior ap- 
proval, any NCA&TSU department) 

General Technology Specialization 

ECT 685 Energy, Power and The Environment 

ECT 690 Special Problems in Electronics and Computer Technology 

ECT 695 Alternate Energy Systems 

ECT 699 Independent Study in Electronics & Computer Technology 

ECT 759 Special Topics in Electronics & Computer Technology 

Computer Information Technology Specialization 

ITT 629 Computer Networking I 

ITT 630 Computer Networking II 

ITT 725 Wide Area Networks 

ITT 745 Network Services for the Enterprise 

BUED 624 E-commerce Design and Implementation 

Telecommunications Technology Specialization 

ITT 601 Wireless Application Protocols I 

ITT 610 Digital Communications I 

ITT 611 Digital Communications II 

ITT 650 Wireless Communication Systems I 

ITT 655 Optical Communication Systems I 

ITT 660 Satellite and Personal Communication Systems 

ITT 665 Wireless Geo-location Systems I 

ITT 670 Communication Circuit Development Laboratory I 

ITT 675 Video Communication Systems 

ITT 680 Radio Wave and Optical Signal Propagation 

ITT 755 Optical Communication Systems II 

ITT 760 Wireless Communication Systems II 

ITT 765 Wireless Geo-location Systems II 

ITT 770 Communication Circuit Development Laboratory II 

Microelectronics and Materials Technology Specialization 

ECT 614 Microelectronic Fabrication Technology 

ECT 615 Introduction to Semiconductor Manufacturing Equipment Technology 

ECT 616 Applied Materials, Semiconductor, Superconductivity 

ECT 617 Advanced Solid State Devices 

ECT 714 Advanced VLSI, Film, and IC Process Technology 

Control and Systems Technology Specialization 

ECT 600 Electromechanical Systems Analysis 

ECT 634 Electronic Instrumentation for Remote Sensing Applications 

ECT 635 Analysis and Design of Mechatronic Systems 

ECT 640 Electronic Automated Testing Systems 



164 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Technical Electives-Information Technology 

(Student is to select technical elective courses from any SOT department or with prior ap- 
proval, any NCA&TSU department) 

Computer Technology Specialization 

Software Systems 

BUED 624 E-Commerce Design and Implementation 

CUIN 760 Programming in BASIC 

CUIN 76 1 Programming in LOGO 

GCS 632 Graphic Animation 

1NEN 625 Information Systems 

Networking 

ITT 605 Principles of Computer Networking 

ITT 629 Computer Networking I 

ITT 630 Computer Networking II 

ITT 635 Administration and Security of Wireless Local Area Networks I 

ITT 640 Administration and Security of Wireless Local Area Networks II 

ITT 645 Analysis and Troubleshooting of Wireless LAN Systems 

Security 

ITT 615 Networking Security Applications 

COMP 620 Information, Privacy and Security 

COMP 627 Wireless Network Security 

Animation/Graphics 

GCS 632 Graphic Animation 

ITT 601 Wireless Application Protocols 

Telecommunications Technology Specialization 

Digital 

ITT 610 Digital Communications I 

ITT 611 Digital Communications II 

Wireless 

ITT 601 Wireless Application Protocols 

ITT 635 Administration and Security of Wireless Local Area Network I 

ITT 640 Administration and Security of Wireless Local Area Network II 

ITT 645 Analysis and Troubleshooting of Wireless LAN Systems 

iiTT 650 Wireless Communication Systems 

ITT 655 Optical Communication Systems 

ITT 660 Satellite and Personal Communication Systems 

ITT 665 Wireless Geo-location Systems 

ITT 755 Optical Communication Systems II 

ITT 760 Wireless Communication Systems II 

ITT 765 Wireless Geo-location Systems II 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 1 65 



Systems 

ITT 670 Communication Circuit Development Laboratory I 

ITT 675 Video Communication Systems 

ITT 680 Radio Wave and Optical Signal Propagation 

ITT 770 Communication Circuit Development Laboratory II 

Required Comprehensive Examination Course 

ECT 788 Master's Comprehensive Examination 

Required Courses 

Project Option: 

MSIT 750 or ECT 750 Internship I or Telecommunications Co-op 

MSIT751 Internship II 

MSIT 789 Master's Degree Project 

Thesis Option: 

MSIT 791 Thesis I 

MSIT 792 Thesis II 

Course Descriptions in Electronics and Computer Technology (ECT) 
Undergraduate/Graduate 

ECT 600. Electromechanical Systems Analysis Credit 4 (4-0) 

This course deals with the fundamentals of electrical and mechanical dynamical systems. Fre 
quency and time domain analysis techniques are utilized. Electrical and mechanical applications 
of first and second order linear differential and difference equations are examined through 
transform techniques. Specialized applications software packages are examined. Prerequisites 
DEPARTMENTAL APPROVAL (F;S;SS) 

ECT 614. Microelectronic Fabrication Technology Credit 3 (1-4) 

This course provides basic lab works on processes as wafer preparation, oxidation, photoli 
thography, doping and deposition used in semiconductor device fabrication. Wafer test 
equipments, measurement/evaluation techniques, as well as clean room microcontamination 
control and operation/safety practices are taught through industry field trips and hands-on ex- 
periments. Economics and industrial production control issues are examined. Students project 
on simple mask-making, and fabricating a working transistor-based IC. Prerequisites: ECT 314 
or ECT 414. (F;S;SS) 

ECT 615. Introduction to Semiconductor Manufacturing 

Equipment Technology Credit 3 (1-4) 

This course teaches basic industrial instrumentation (electrical and non-electrical) and automa- 
tion, as well as associated fundamental concepts used to develop various applications for the 
semiconductor industry. This course covers various industrial applications including: Vacuum 
theory and technology, Design and Installation of industrial clean room facilities and equip 
ments for photolithography, CVD/PVD,RF plasma, etc. Prerequisites: ECT 360, ECT 414 
(F;S;SS) 



:i 



1 66 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



ECT 616. Applied Materials, Semiconductors, and Superconductivity Credit 3 (2-2) 
This course covers band theory of solids, crystal imperfections; mechanical and thermal prop- 
erties; microscopic theory of conductivity, polarizability, permeability, including high frequency 
effect; Elemental and compound semiconductors; Introduction to BCS theory of superconduc- 
tivity, Josephson tunneling, type II superconductors. Laboratory experiments conducted in the 
course includes: basic measurements of mechanical, chemical, thermal, electrical and mag- 
netic properties of various electronic materials; fabrication and testing of solar cells, Josephson 
junction, cryogenics, and vacuum deposition of films. Prerequisites: PHYS 225, 226, 235, 236 
(F;S;SS) 

ECT 617. Advanced Solid State Devices Credit 3 (2-2) 

I This course covers band model and carrier transport in semiconductors; excess carriers; Inter- 
faces; Physics of the p-n junction and MOS sandwich; IC design at low frequencies for TTL, 
CMOS, and analog circuitry. The course also includes a broad review of the theory /design/ 
fabrication of monolithic, film, heterojunction, and high frequency semiconductor devices in- 
volving quantum dots/wires, mesoscopic devices, Rf Gunn effect, laser sources etc. for integrated 
optics, nanotechnology, and quantum computing. Students shall use advanced simulation tools 
for extensive numerical modeling of semiconductor devices and fabrication processes. Prereq- 
uisites: ECT 414 (F;S;SS) 

ECT 635. Analysis and Design of Mechatronic Systems Credit 3 (1-4) 

This course deals with the principles of analyzing and designing mechatronics systems. This 

course includes a review of logic gates, microprocessor architecture, sensors and actuators, 
L A/D and D/A conversion techniques, real-time multi-tasking programming concepts, and direct 
"digital control implementation. The course includes "hands-on" experiences through several 

laboratory assignments and a final team project. Prerequisites: ECT 201 , ECT 312, ECT 313. 

(F;S;SS) 



, ECT 640. Electronic Automated Testing Systems Credit 3 (2-2) 

I This course addresses the fundamentals of electronic automated testing systems. Topics in- 
clude: Production, reliability, and maintenance testing. Various types of Automated Test 
i Equipment (ATE) are addressed, including Built in Test Equipment (BITE) and stand alone 

1 systems. Prerequisites: ECT 360. (F;S;SS) 

i 

il ECT 685. Energy Power and the Environment Credit 3 (3-0) 

, This course will cover the basic concepts of electric power generation, utilization, and power 

i networks. How total energy consumption and the global economy, affects the environment will 

j be studied. Prerequisite: ECT 355 (F;S;SS) 

I ECT 690. Special Problems in Electronics and Computer Technology Credit 3 (3-0) 
This lecture course is used to introduce new topics in the field of electronics and computer 
It technology. The subject matter will be identified prior to the beginning of the course. Prerequi- 
. site: Departmental Approval. (F;S;SS) 

1 ECT 695. Alternate Energy Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will cover the production of electric energy from alternate energy sources includ- 
ing solar, wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal and ocean. Also, this course will provide the 
background knowledge of the characteristics of direct conversion, electromechanical conver- 
sion, and storage devices used in alternate energy systems. This course will also cover power 
system issues associated with integration of small scale energy sources into the electricity grid 
will be fully investigated. Prerequisite: ECT 355 or Departmental Approval (F;S;SS) 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 167 



ECT 699. Independent Study in Electronics and Computer Technology Credit 3 (3-0^ 

The student selects a problem (technical or managerial) in consultation with a faculty membei 
in an area related to Electronics Technology or Computer Technology or Telecommunications 
or Networking. The student along with the faculty member defines the problem's objectives 
and a solution is pursued. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. (F;S;SS) 

Graduate 

ECT 714. Advanced VLSI, Film, and IC process Technology Credit 3 (3-0| 

This course introduces computer aided design tools for VLSI; Mask design styles, layout edi- 
tors, placement/routing, design rule checking, etc.; thick films, advanced PVD/CVD systems: 
advanced lithographic and IC process techniques. The course also presents application to low 
frequency, Rf, and optical frequency micro- and nano- electronic devices. Prerequisite: ECT 
614or615(F;S;SS) 

ECT 730. Systems Integration for Telecommunications Managers Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course delineates methods by which telecommunications systems can be put together to 
serve the needs of an organization. Students trace how the project manager should operate 
under constraints of time, cost, performance, competition, and regulation. The course involves 
extended case studies and group project. Prerequisites: ECT 620 (F;S;SS) 

ECT 735. Telecommunication Management Issues Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course assesses the impact of current and future trends on telecommunication landscape. 
Topics include technological changes, strategic planning, financial analysis, and the roles of 
organizational entities such as research and development, production, human resources, and 
operations. Prerequisite: ECT 620 (F;S;SS) 

ECT 740. Regulatory and Policy Issues for Communication Systems Credit 3 (2-2) 
This course examines current codes and procedures in sampling, engineering standards, testing 
procedures and guidelines. Data analysis using computer modeling and statistical analysis will 
be presented. Prerequisite: Departmental Approval (F;S;SS) 

ECT 750. Telecommunications Co-op Credit 3 (3-0) 

The co-op experience is designed to provide students with an intern experience of working 
full-time in a technical environment related to electronics and computer technology or tele- 
communications. For 3 hours of credit, the student must be employed full-time for one semester. 
Evaluation of student will be based on reports from student's work supervisor and co-op coor- 
dinator. Prerequisite: 15 hours of graduate credit. (F;S;SS) 

ECT 759. Special Topics in Electronics and Computer Technology Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course involves the study of a topic not addressed by an existing course in the department. 
Typically, a topic is selected from within a new or evolving area in the field. Prerequisite: 
Departmental Approval. (F;S;SS) 

ECT 785. Electric Energy and Environmental Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will discuss the role of electricity from fossil and nuclear fuels, and renewable 
resources. It will investigate the impact of high voltage transmission lines as well as the health 
effects of electricity generation. The course will do an assessment of cogeneration cycles and 
demand side management. In addition, emission control in the US electric utility industry and 
an evaluation of uncertainties in quantifying emissions impacts will be studied. Prerequisites: 
ECT 685 or Departmental Approval (F;S;SS) 



168 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



ECT 788. Master's Comprehensive Exam Credit (0-1) 

This course will aid in the preparation of the graduate student to take the Master of Science in 
Industrial Technology (MSIT) comprehensive examination. The examination will be adminis- 
tered towards the end of the semester or summer session. This course will be graded on a Pass/ 
Fail basis. The passing of this course is a requirement for graduation from the MSIT program. 
Prerequisites: 24 credit hours of graduate level courses. (F;S;SS) 

Course Descriptions in Information and Telecommunication Technology (ITT) 
Undergraduate/Graduate 



ITT 600. Project Management for Information Technology Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course delves into the unique challenges of managing information technology projects, 
and offers a road map to success. The course is specifically designed to address the skills 
inventory and performance outcomes that a student needs to be successful in today's volatile 
j information technology market. Prerequisite: Senior standing (F;S;SS) 

[ITT 601. Wireless Application Protocols Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course takes you through the basics of Wireless Application Protocols (WAPs), and pro- 
P vides all the information needed to create WAP pages using the Wireless Markup Language 
; (WML). The course will include an introduction to WAP and WML, cards and decks, text 
i! formatting elements, navigational commands in WML, and WML variables. Prerequisites: ECT 
\i 201 and Junior Standing (F;S;SS) 

t ITT 605. Principles of Computer Networking Credit 3 (2-2) 

I This course explores all the hardware and software that drives local and Internet computing. 
■ Special emphasis is placed on connectivity and throughput. Prerequisites: ECT 313 (F;S;SS) 

j ITT 610. Digital Communications I Credit 3 (2-2) 

c ; The class will investigate digital communications systems for various signals including audio, 

video and data. Topics include: sampling, quantization, multiplexing, coding, modems, various 

compression schemes, signal impairments, and various digital modulation schemes. Prerequi- 

} sites: ECT 350 (F;S;SS) 

) ITT 611. Digital Communications II Credit 3 (2-2) 

I This course is a continuation of ECT 610. Emphasis is placed on multimedia networks and 

their supporting platforms. Topics include audio and video standards and compression schemes, 

cable modems and xDSL schemes. Prerequisites: ECT 610 or departmental approval (F;S;SS) 

I ITT 615. Networking Security Applications Credit 3 (2-2) 

J This course explores security terms, definitions, concepts, and issues that face industries today. 

) This course also will examine how the concept of security, and being secure, integrates into the 

overall enterprise mission. The importance of user involvement, security training, ethics, trust, 

and informed management will be explored. Prerequisites: ITT 605 (F;S;SS) 

) ITT 620. Telecommunications Management Credit 3 (2-2) 

. This course addresses fundamental principles of telecommunications management, which in- 
cludes network management and administration, the telecommunications marketplace, and the 
planning and evaluation of systems. The technology of modern telecommunications systems is 
' also reviewed. Prerequisites: ECT 350. (F;S;SS) 






Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 169 



ITT 625. Computer Database Management Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course focuses exclusively on the design and system issues related to distributed database 
systems. Students will learn the usage of different design strategies for distributed databases, 
and they will study query processing techniques and algorithms as well as transaction manage- 
ment and concurrency control concepts used in such systems. Design and implementation issues 
related to multidatabase systems also will be discussed. In addition, the course focuses on 
applying the techniques learned in course to commercial database management systems. Pre- 
requisites: ITT 600 (F;S;SS) 

ITT 629. Computer Networking I Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course introduces the student to Local Area Networks (LAN) and introduction to Wide 
Area Networks (WAN). The course also will provide the basic understanding of network con- 
cepts and router programming. Prerequisite: ECT 212 and ECT 213 or ECT 299 (F;S;SS) 

ITT 630. Computer Networking II Credit 3 (1-4) 

The course covers the advanced study of Local Area Networks (LAN) and Wide Area Net- 
works (WAN). The students will develop competences in designing and implementing 
enterprise-wide networks using routers and switches. Prerequisites: ITT 629. (F;S;SS) 

ITT 634. Electronic Instrumentation for Remote Sensing 

Applications Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course will provide practical knowledge of the operation of electronics instruments used 
in the applications of telemetry, remote sensing and detection. Possible electronic systems that 
will be discussed include RADAR, SONAR, LIDAR, and SODAR. Prerequisites: ECT 350 or 
departmental approval (F;S;SS) 

ITT 635. Administration and Security of Wireless 

Local Area Network I Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course will introduce students to wireless network protocols, access modes, portable com- 
munications and computing devices, management tools, security solutions, and current industry 
best practices for managing wireless networks in a secure environment. Case studies will be 
used throughout the course. Prerequisites: ECT 350 (F;S;SS) 

ITT 640. Administration and Security of Wireless 

Local Area Network II Credit 3 (2-2) 

A continuation of ITT 635, this course provides students with an in-depth understanding of the 
security vulnerabilities to wireless networks and their corresponding countermeasures. This 
course includes training on practical methods for designing, configuring, testing, and main- 
taining wireless networks appropriate to their organizations' operating requirements. 
Prerequisites: ITT 635 (F;S;SS) 

ITT 645. Analysis and Troubleshooting of Wireless LAN Systems Credit 3 (1-4) 

This course presents an in-depth understanding of the frame structure of 802.1 1 frames, frame 
exchange processes between wireless nodes, analyzing security solutions for both effective- 
ness and weaknesses, analyzing performance in both pure and mixed-mode environments, and 
using analyzers for site surveying and intrusion detection. ITT 635 (F;S;SS) 

ITT 650. Wireless Communication Systems I Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course covers fundamental theory and design of high capacity wireless communication 
systems. Topics include trunking, propagation effects, frequency reuse, modulation methods, 
coding and equalization. Emerging cellular and next generation personal communication sys- 
tems will also be analyzed. Prerequisites: ECT 350 (F;S;SS) 



1 70 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



< ITT 655. Optical Communication Systems I Credit 3 (2-2) 

P This course covers free space and fiber optic technologies (including lasers, optical amplifiers 
■ and optical filters) with applications to high-speed long distance systems, local area networks 
r and communication systems. Prerequisites: ECT 350 (F;S;SS) 



i, ITT 660. Satellite and Personal Communication Systems Credit 3 (2-2) 

. This course covers the theory and practice of satellite communications including: orbits, launch- 
: ers, spacecraft link budgets, modulation techniques, coding, multiple access techniques, 
propagation effects and earth terminals. Prerequisites: ECT 350 (F;S;SS) 
I 
L ITT 665. Wireless Geo-location Systems I Credit 3 (2-2) 

... This course will describe the basic concepts and mechanics of Global Positioning Systems 
i (GPS) and Inertial Navigation Systems (INS). Practical applications of GPS, INS and GPS/ 
INS will be covered. Simple algebraic mathematical calculations will be completed. Prerequi- 
f sites: ECT 350 or departmental approval (F;S;SS) 

It ITT 670. Communication Circuit Development Laboratory I Credit 3 (1-4) 

This course studies advanced methods of analysis of communication circuits including oscilla- 
tors, radio frequency amplifiers, matching networks, modulators, mixers, and detectors for HF 
through UHF frequency range using Y- and S- parameter methods. Prerequisite: ECT 350. 

( (F;S;SS) 

1 

I ITT 675. Video Communication Systems Credit 3 (2-2) 

•J This course will study the techniques used to transmit and receive analog and digital video 
information. This course will also discuss current state of the art video technology such as High 
Definition Television (HDTV). Prerequisite: ECT 350. (F;S;SS) 

i ITT 680. Radio Wave and Optical Signal Propagation Credit 3 (2-2) 

J This courses models the behavior of unguided electromagnetic and optical waves in the atmo- 
,-, sphere, space, urban and indoor environments. The course will also discuss path, frequency 
. and antenna selection for practical radio wave communication systems. Prerequisite: ECT 350. 
(F;S;SS) 

I ITT 685. Ethical issues in Information Technology Credit 3 (3-0) 

(I This course explores issues on the interface between information technology and society, with 
; a special focus on ethical issues. Topics include ethical theory, privacy and security, spam, 
, electronic commerce, the digital divide, open source software, medical informatics, 
bioinformatics, actor-network theory, ethnomethodology, and some neo-classical economics. 
• Prerequisite: Senior Standing (F;S;SS) 

Graduate Students Only 

i 

I ITT 725. Wide Area Networks Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will examine Wide Area Networks (WANs) and associated media devices and 
j protocols. Also in this course the design, simulation, and implementation of extranet and internet 
1 WAN systems will be developed and tested. Prerequisite: Departmental Approval (F;S;SS) 

! ITT 745. Network Services for the Enterprise Credit 3 (3-0) 

The principles of current wired and wireless services in the telecommunication industry are 
analyzed for systems and effectiveness. Projected trends and patterns of systems applicable to 
the industrial communication network will be researched. Prerequisite: Departmental Approval 
(F;S;SS) 






Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 171 



ITT 755. Optical Communication Systems II Credit 3 (2-2 

This course is a continuation of ECT 655. The course will focus primarily on optical sig 
nal processing technologies as they are applied to high-speed communication systems 
Prerequisites: ECT 655 (F;S;SS) 

ITT 760. Wireless Communication Systems II Credit 3 (2-2 

The course will discuss the transmission of data over mobile links and digital packet date 
systems. The course will also address security and privacy issues in wireless communicatior 
systems. These topics will be introduced via in-depth case studies of wireless standards such as 
IS-41, GSM, PCS and third generation standards and technologies. Prerequisites: ECT 650 oi 
ECT 660 (F;S;SS) 

ITT 765. Wireless Geo-location Systems II Credit 3 (2-2 

This course will provide integrated practical examples, in-depth case studies and guidelines foil 
building GPS systems. The course will review in-depth implementation techniques for position 
location systems. Prerequisites: ECT 665 (F;S;SS) 

ITT 770. Communication Circuit Development Laboratory II Credit 3 (1-4) 

This course is a continuation of ECT 670. The course will study practical methods of building 
a complete high frequency or ultra high frequency communication system at the discrete com 
ponent level. Prerequisites: ECT 670 (F;S;SS) 



172 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Energy and Environmental Studies Ph.D. Program 



www.ees .neat .edu 

Keith Schimmel, Director 

School of Graduate Studies 

Bluford Library, Suite 100 

(336) 256-2341 

schimmel @ neat .edu 

OBJECTIVE 

The program is designed to prepare men and women for positions in research and consult- 
5 ing in industry, government and service organizations, and teaching and research positions in 
colleges and universities. Graduates will be able to: 

1 . Conceive, develop, and conduct original research leading to useful applications in energy 
and environmental systems. 

2. Incorporate into their professional work considerations relating to scientific, technical, 
managerial, and social aspects of energy and environmental systems. 

3. Contribute to societal understanding of global energy and environmental issues including 
homeland security through development of interdisciplinary educational materials and 
participation in international exchanges. 

4. Demonstrate effective written and oral communication skills related to research issues in 
energy and environmental systems. 

GENERAL PROGRAM ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Requirements for admission are: 

1 . A master 's degree in engineering , agriculture , science , technology, public health and policy 
or business from a college or university recognized by a regional or general accrediting 
agency with a minimum GPA of 3.25/4.0. 

2. GRE score of at least 1 100. 

3. For applicants whose native language is other than English, Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL) examination score of 550 or higher on the written examination or at 
least 213 on the computer examination. 

INTEGRATED M.S./Ph.D. PROGRAM 

The integrated M.SVPh.D. program is available to attract outstanding and motivated stu- 
dents into the Ph.D. program by shortening the time required to obtain both degrees. A student 
with a B.S. degree in a science, engineering, or technology discipline from an accredited pro- 
gram, and with superior credentials (GPA>3.5, GRE>1200, and strong reference letters), may 
participate in this program. Students in this program are not formally admitted to the Ph.D. 
program until completion of department requirements for a master's degree at NC A&T State 
University. A student in the program must complete the M.S. degree (thesis option) within 24 
months with a minimum GPA of 3.3. Up to 6 credit hours of 700-800 level courses may be 
"double counted" to satisfy both requirements of the M.S. degree and the Ph.D. degree for 
students in this program. A grade of at least 3.0 is required for a course to be counted toward 
both degrees. 



i Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 173 



Co-Major 

Students in the Energy and Environmental Studies Ph.D. Program may co-major with 
other Ph.D. programs offered by NC A&T State University or through the interinstitutional 
Ph.D. program. This will require the approval of both Ph.D. programs and approval of the 
student's combined advisory committee. Co-majors must meet all requirements for majors in 
both programs. Only one degree is awarded and the co-major is noted on the transcript. Co- 
majors are not permitted between Doctorate-level and lower-level programs. 

PROGRAM OPTIONS AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

The program requires 51 credit hours beyond the M.S. degree distributed as follows: 

27 credit hours for course work, 

3 credit hours for seminars, 

3 credit hours for professional practice/development, 

and 18 credit hours for dissertation research. 

Students progress through the program by passing a written qualifying exam over the four 
core courses and a preliminary exam over the student's proposed research. As an indicator of 
their research competency, all students will be required to submit at least two refereed journal 
articles that have been approved by their dissertation committee before graduation. The pro- 
gram requirements are summarized as follows: 

Requirement Category Credits Courses 

Core Courses 12 EES 720, 810, 811 , 820 

Written Qualifying Examination EES 991 , Covers core courses only 



Elective Track 


9 


Courses at the 600-level, 700-level or 800-level 
Options are presented below 


Supervised Teaching/Practicum 


3 


EES 990 or EES 993 


Seminar Requirement 


3 


EES 992 


Technical Electives 


6 


Courses at the 700-level or 800-level, 
Subject to advisor approval * 


Preliminary Examination 


3 


EES 995 


Dissertation 


15 


EES 997 


TOTAL 


51 





* EES 710 (Theor&Pract of Energy & Env Sci) required as a core course only for students 
who have not previously had undergraduate or graduate courses in the biological or chemical 
aspects of energy and environmental science. 

Elective Tracks 

Biotechnology (ANSC 771, BIOL 700, BIOL 703, BIOL 704, BIOL 706, BIOL 739, BIOL 
741, BIOL 749, BIOL 750, BIOL 755, BIOL 780, BIOL 842, BIOL 843, CHEM 756, EASC 
718, EES 785 , EES 885 , HORT 700, PHYS 744, and other courses subject to advisor approval) 

Energy and Environmental Education (CUIN 711, CUIN 721 , CUIN 729, CUIN 746, ECT 
785, EES 785, EES 885, TECH 715, TECH 762, TECH 763, TECH 764, TECH 765, TECH 
766, TECH 767, and other courses subject to advisor approval) 



174 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Energy and Environmental System Modeling (AGEN 701, AGEN 714, CIEN 702, CIEN 
712, CIEN 724, EES 785, EES 885, MATH 712, MATH 721 , MATH 723, MATH 731 , MATH 

; 733, MATH 752, MATH 765, MATH 781, MEEN 716, MEEN 752, MEEN 860, and other 

■ courses subject to advisor approval) 

) Energy Technologies (ECT 785, EES 785, EES 885, MEEN 838, PHYS 738, PHYS 739, and 
other courses subject to advisor approval) 

Environmental Justice (EASC 708, EES 785, EES 885, and other courses subject to advisor 
approval) 

i Environmental Sciences ( ANSC 70 1 , BIOL 700 , CHEM 711, CHEM 721, CHEM 722 , CHEM 

; 723, CHEM 727, CHEM 731, CHEM 732, CHEM 741, CHEM 742, CHEM 743, CHEM 744, 

; CHEM 746, CHEM 748, CHEM 749, CHEM 756, EASC 718, EES 785, EES 885, OSH 704, 

OSH 706, OSH 731, PHYS 736, PHYS 735, PHYS 738, PHYS 739, PHYS 744, PHYS 745, 

SLSC 710, SLSC 715, SLSC 717, SLSC 727, SLSC 734, and other courses subject to advisor 

approval) 

i Fate and Transport of Contaminants (AGEN 701, AGEN 714, CHEN 710, CHEN 720, 
CHEN 750, CHEN 760, EASC 718, EES 785, EES 885, MEEN 820, MEEN 822, MEEN 850, 
, SLSC 734, and other courses subject to advisor approval) 

t ! Information Technology (ANSC 771, BIOL 706, BIOL 755, BIOL 842, BIOL 843, COMP 

. 710, COMP 711, COMP 712, COMP 713, COMP 732, COMP 740, COMP 755, COMP 770, 

COMP 785, CSE 702, CSE 703, CSE 704, EES 785, EES 885, ELEN 720, ELEN 821 , ELEN 

822, MATH 706, MATH 708, MATH 721, MATH 733, MATH 752, MATH 765, and other 

courses subject to advisor approval) 

! Materials (CHEN 760, EES 785, EES 885, ELEN 701, ELEN 710, ELEN 801, ELEN 802, 
[ ELEN 803, ELEN 804, ELEN 805, ELEN 810, MEEN 752, MEEN 810, MEEN 813, MEEN 
! 820, MEEN 822, MEEN 850, MEEN 860, and other courses subject to advisor approval) 

' Nanotechnology (CSE7 1 1 , CSE7 1 2 , CSE7 1 3 , EES 785 , EES 885 , PHYS 735 , and other courses 
subject to advisor approval) 

i Power Electronics Systems (ELEN 764, ELEN 861 , ELEN 862, and other courses subject to 
advisor approval) 

Sensors and Controls (EES 785, EES 885, ELEN 762, ELEN 764, ELEN 861, ELEN 862, 
! ELEN 866, ELEN 867, ELEN 868, ELEN 869, ELEN 870, ELEN 871 , INEN 85 1 , INEN 852, 
MATH 752, and other courses subject to advisor approval) 

1 Separations and Reactions (CHEM 749, CHEN 720, CHEN 750, CHEN 760, EES 785, EES 
885, SLSC 734, and other courses subject to advisor approval) 

! Solid and Hazardous Waste Management (CIEN 710, CIEN 712, EES 785, EES 885, and 
! i other courses subject to advisor approval) 

\ Systems Management and Economics (ACCT 714, AREN 770, AREN 778, BUAD 712, 
! BUAD 713, BUAD 715, BUAD 716, BUAD 718, ECT 785, EES 785, EES 885, INEN 721, 
I INEN 731, INEN 734, INEN 821, INEN 822, INEN 832, INEN 833, INEN 843, INEN 844, 
j and other courses subject to advisor approval) 

! Sustainable Technologies for the Built Environment (AREN 702, AREN 742, AREN 762, 
'. AREN 765, AREN 770, AREN 772, AREN 778, EES 785, EES 885, and other courses subject 
1 to advisor approval) 

f Transportation and Logistics (EES 785 , EES 885 , TRAN 70 1 , TRAN 720, TRAN 725 , TRAN 
727, TRAN 730, and other courses subject to advisor approval) 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 175 



Ph.D. COMMITTEE AND PLAN OF GRADUATE WORK 

Initially the Director of the program will serve as the academic advisor for all new stu- 
dents entering the program. Each student in the Ph.D. program is expected to select a major 
advisor by the beginning of the second year with the approval of the Director. The major advi- 
sor must hold a tenure or tenure-track full-time faculty position at the university. However, a 
co-advisor may have non-tenure-track/adjunct status. The Ph.D. Committee will consist of a 
minimum of four (4) graduate faculty members with the major advisor as its chairperson. Com- 
mittee members must be from at least two different departments. Also, members must represent 
more than one campus School/College. The Ph.D. Committee will be recommended by the ma- 
jor advisor, with input from the student, to the Director of the Ph.D. program, for approval by the 
Dean of Graduate Studies. 

PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION 

The dissertation written proposal is submitted to the student's major advisor and the Ph.D. 
Committee for review. Dissertation proposals are expected to review the state-of-the-art and 
should clearly indicate that a substantial literature search has been completed. The proposal 
must be orally defended by the candidate before the Ph.D. Committee, and it must be accepted 
by the committee. The signature of committee members on the dissertation proposal consti- 
tutes approval to proceed with research. After receiving a passing grade- in the preliminary 
exam course, EES 995, the student may register for the Energy & Environmental Studies Ph.D. 
Dissertation course, EES 997. 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY 

Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree in Energy & Environmental Studies will 
require compliance with the following: 

a) Completion of all core and elective courses approved for the student's program of study, 
b) A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, and c) Successful completion of preliminary 
examination. 

FINAL ORAL EXAMINATION 

The final oral examination is scheduled after the dissertation is complete, except for such 
revisions as may be necessary as a result of the examination, but not earlier than one semester, 
or its equivalent, after admission to candidacy and not before at least two refereed journal 
articles have been approved by the Ph.D. committee and are in review by the journals. The 
examination consists of the candidate's defense of methodology used and the conclusions reached 
in the research, as reported in the dissertation. It is conducted by the student's Ph.D. commit- 
tee. A majority vote of approval by the advisory committee is required for passing the final oral 
examination. Approval may be conditioned, however, on the student's meeting specific re- 
quirements described by the Ph.D. committee. Failure of a student to pass the examination 
terminates one's work at this institution unless the Ph.D. committee recommends a reexamina- 
tion. No reexamination is given until one full semester has elapsed and only one reexamination 
is permitted. 

OTHER INFORMATION 

See "Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree" elsewhere in this catalog for 
information related to residence requirements and time limit. Additional details of require- 
ments for the program are outlined in the Energy and Environmental Studies Ph.D. Program 
Student Handbook available from the Graduate School. 



1 76 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



List of Courses Credits 

EES 710 Theory and Practice of Energy and Environmental Science 3 

EES 720 Theory and Practice of Alternative Energy Technologies 3 

EES 785 Special Topics 3 

EES 810 Economic and Legal Aspects of Energy and Environmental Management I 3 

! EES 811 Economic and Legal Aspects of Energy and Environmental Management II 3 

EES 820 Acquisition and Management of Energy and Environmental Data 3 

EES 885 Special Topics 3 

Ph.D. Level Pass/Fail Courses 

EES 990 Doctoral Supervised Practicum 3 

EES 991 Doctoral Qualifying Examination 

EES 992 Doctoral Seminar 1 

EES 993 Doctoral Supervised Teaching 3 

EES 994 Doctoral Supervised Research 3 

EES 995 Doctoral Preliminary Examination 3 

EES 997 Doctoral Dissertation Var. 3-9 

EES 999 Continuation of Doctoral Dissertation 1 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

EES-710. Theory and Practice of Energy and Environmental Science Credit 3 (2-2) 

'This course presents both the biological and chemical aspects of energy and environmental 
science. The biological aspects involve the role of microbes in the environment, remediation 
iprocesses, and energy production, while the chemical aspects deal with the chemistries of air, 
'water, and soil systems. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. 

EES-720. Theory and Practice of Alternative Energy Technologies Credit 3 (2-2) 

;The course will cover the thermodynamic, mass and energy balance, economic, and environ- 
mental considerations of alternative energy technologies. Alternative energy technologies and 
conventional energy technologies will be compared. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and con- 
sent of instructor. 

EES-785. Special Topics Credit 3 (3-0) 

1 This course allows the introduction of new topics on a trial basis at the master's level. The topic 
of the course will be determined prior to registration. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and 
consent of instructor. 

I EES-810. Economic and Legal Aspects of Energy and Environmental 

Management I Credit 3 (3-0) 

] This course is a study of economic and legal concepts that affect the decision-making process in 
the management of energy and the environment. Policy case studies are used to allow a variety 
of perspectives to be examined. Prerequisites: Doctoral standing and consent of instructor. 

I EES-811. Economic and Legal Aspects of Energy and Environmental 

Management II Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a continuation of EES 810. Prerequisites: Doctoral standing and consent of instructor. 

EES-820. Acquisition and Management of Energy and 

Environmental Data Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course is a study of theories and techniques for acquiring and managing scientific data and 
information related to the analysis, design, and management of energy and environmental sys- 
tems. Prerequisites: Doctoral standing and consent of instructor. 

Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 111 



EES-885. Doctoral Special Topics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course allows the introduction of new topics on a trial basis at the doctoral level. The topic 
of the course will be determined prior to registration. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and 
consent of instructor. 

EES-990. Doctoral Supervised Practicum Credit 3 (0-6) 

This course represents the supervised internship for the doctoral student that satisfies the 3 
credits of required professional development. Oral and written presentations on the experience 
will be provided to the faculty. Grading is pass/fail evaluation only. Prerequisites: Doctoral 
standing and consent of instructor. 

EES-991. Doctoral Qualifying Examination Credit (0-1) 

This course will guide the student to take the qualifying examination. The qualifying examina- 
tion will consist of a written examination over the Energy and Environmental Studies program 
core courses. Prerequisites: EES 720 and EES 810. Corequisites: EES 811 and EES 820. 

EES-992. Doctoral Seminar Credit 1 (1-0) 

This course includes presentations delivered by the doctoral student, faculty, and invited speakers. 
Each registered student will present at least one seminar and provide at least one formal cri- 
tique of a presentation. Grading is pass/fail evaluation only. Prerequisite: Doctoral standing. 

EES-993. Doctoral Supervised Teaching Credit 3 (1-4) 

This course represents the supervised teaching for the doctoral student that satisfies the 3 cred- 
its of required professional development. This course introduces the doctoral student to classroom 
or laboratory teaching under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Doctoral students who serve 
as teaching assistants or as instructors are required to take this course during the first semester 
they teach. Grading is pass/fail evaluation only. Prerequisites: Doctoral standing and consent 
of instructor. 

EES-994. Doctoral Supervised Research Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is supervised research under the mentorship of a member of the graduate faculty 
before a student passes the preliminary exam. This research should lead to the identification of 
a dissertation topic and written research proposal. Grading is pass/fail evaluation only. Prereq- 
uisites: Doctoral standing and consent of instructor. 

EES-995. Doctoral Preliminary Examination Credit 3 (3-0) 

In this course dissertation advisors will guide their students towards completing the prelimi- 
nary examination. The preliminary examination will consist of a written proposal and oral 
defense of the student's dissertation proposal. Grading is pass/fail evaluation only. Prerequi- 
site: EES 991. 

EES-997. Doctoral Dissertation Variable Credit 3 (3-9) 

This course represents the supervised research leading to the dissertation for the doctoral stu- 
dent who has passed the preliminary exam. Doctoral dissertation research will be conducted 
under the supervision of the dissertation committee chairperson and include regular meetings 
with the dissertation committee to evaluate progress on the dissertation. Grading is pass/fail 
evaluation only. Prerequisite: EES 995. 

EES-999. Continuation of Doctoral Dissertation Credit 1 (1-0) 

This course is a continuation of EES 997. The course is for doctoral students who have com- 
pleted all required credit hour requirements. Grading is pass/fail evaluation only. Prerequisites: 
Doctoral standing and completion of all dissertation credits. 



178 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



English 

http://www.ncat.edu/~english/ 

Shirley H. Bell, Interim Chairperson 

426-A New Classroom Building 

(336) 334-7771 or (336) 334-7772 

OBJECTIVE 

The objective of the English Department is to provide in-depth training in English Educa- 
tion; English, American, and African American literature; folklore; and language. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

I Master of Arts Degree - English and African American Literature 
Master of Science Degree - English Education 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE M.A. PROGRAM IN 

ENGLISH AND AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE AND 

THE M.S. PROGRAM IN ENGLISH EDUCATION 

All applicants to the M.A. and M.S. programs must have earned a bachelor's degree from 
a four-year college. Applicants must also have completed a minimum of twenty-four (24) un- 
dergraduate hours in English. The hours must include at least three semester hours of 
i Shakespeare, three of American literature, three of English literature, three of world literature 
,or contemporary literature, three of advanced grammar, and three of advanced composition. 
i A student who fails to meet these qualifications will be expected to satisfy the requirements 
rby enrolling in undergraduate courses before beginning graduate studies in English. Scores for 
ithe GRE general test must be submitted for consideration as a part of the admission process. 

Application forms may be obtained from the office of the Graduate School and are also 
available on-line at the A&T Web-site. Application forms must be completed and returned to 
j the Graduate School Office. Two (2) official transcripts of previous undergraduate or graduate 
records and three (3) letters of recommendation must be forwarded to the Graduate Office 
before action can be taken on the application. An applicant may be admitted to the program 
unconditionally, provisionally, or as a special student. 

Unconditional Admission. To qualify for unconditional admission to the programs, an 
S applicant must have earned an overall average of 3.0 on a four-point system (or 2.0 on a three 
1 point system) in undergraduate studies. 

Provisional Admission. An applicant may be admitted to graduate studies on a provisional 
basis if (1) the record of undergraduate preparation reveals deficiencies that can be removed 

• near the beginning of graduate study, or if (2) the applicant lacks the required grade point 

: average for unconditional admission. The applicant may then become eligible for uncondi- 
tional admission by successfully completing the first nine (9) hours of course work with a 3 .0 
or better average. Students admitted provisionally may also be required to pass examinations 

I to demonstrate their knowledge in certain areas or to take special undergraduate courses to 
improve their background. A minimum grade point average of 2.6 in undergraduate work is 

i required for provisional admission. 

Special Students. Students not seeking the M.A. or M.S. degree may be admitted in order 
to take courses for self-improvement or for renewal of teaching certificates. If the student 
subsequently wishes to pursue the M.A. or M.S. program, he or she must request an evaluation 
of the work. Under no circumstances may the student apply toward a degree program more 
than twelve (12) hours earned as a special student. 

Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 179 



M.A. AND M.S. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Total Hours Required. The M.A. and M.S. programs consist of two distinct but similar 
elements. For the M.A. program, the student may elect to take twenty-seven (27) hours of! 
course work and write a thesis for three (3) hours credit in order to satisfy the thirty-hour 
minimum requirement. The student may also elect not to write a thesis and take an additional 
three (3) hours of course work in order to satisfy the thirty-hour minimum requirement. For the 
M.S. program, the student may elect to take thirty-six (36) hours of course work and write a 
thesis for three (3) hours credit in order to satisfy the requirement of thirty-nine (39) total 
hours. The student may also elect not to write a thesis and take an additional three (3) hours of 
course work in order to satisfy the requirement of thirty-nine (39) hours. 

For the M.A program, three specific English courses are required: ENGL 700 - Introduc 
tion to Critical Theory; ENGL 753 - Introduction to Graduate Literary Studies; and ENGL 
755 - Contemporary Practices in Grammar and Rhetoric. In addition, the student must tak 
twelve (12) hours in African American Literature and nine (9) hours in English and American 
Literature. (The student who elects the thesis option is required to take only nine (9) hours in 
African- American Literature.) 

For the M.S. program, four specific English courses are required: ENGL 700 - Introduc 
tion to Critical Theory; ENGL 730 - Directed Study in English; ENGL 753 - Introduction to 
Graduate Literary Studies; and ENGL 755 - Contemporary Practices in Grammar and Rheto- 
ric. In addition, five specific courses in Curriculum and Instruction are required: CUIN 619 — 
Learning Theories; CUIN 711- Research and Inquiry; CUIN 721 -Advanced Methods; CUIN 
728 - Technology in K-12 Schools; and CUIN 729 - Diversity Issues in K-12 Schools. 

Courses at the 700 level (and ENGL 699) are open only to graduate students. For students 
in both programs, fifty percent of their course work must be at the 700 level. Therefore, stu 
dents enrolled in the M.A. program must complete fifteen (15) hours of course work at the 700 
level. Students in the M.S. program satisfy this requirement automatically because eight (8) of 
their required courses, totaling twenty-four (24) hours, are at the 700 level. (Students may 
apply 700 level professional education courses toward meeting this requirement.) All 600 level 
courses (except for ENGL 699) are open both to senior undergraduate students and to graduate 
students. 

Grades Required. Students in the programs must maintain at least a 3.0 grade point aver- 
age in order to satisfy the grade requirements of the program. If a student receives a C or lower 
in more than two (2) courses, he or she will be dropped from the program. 

Amount of Credit Accepted for Transfer. The Graduate School will accept six (6) semester 
hours of transfer credit from another institution for those students enrolled in degree programs. 

Other Requirements (Comprehensive and Thesis Examinations). For the M.A. and M.S. 
degrees, students must pass a three (3) hour written comprehensive examination administered 
by the English Department. The comprehensive examination will cover only material to which 
the student has been exposed in course work at A&T. The comprehensive examination may be 
taken twice. An additional comprehensive examination in education is required of persons 
pursuing the M.S. degree. Those students who elect to write a thesis must meet the deadlines 
projected by the Graduate School in addition to standing for a one-hour oral examination which 
constitutes a defense of the thesis. The defense may be attempted twice. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Both the M.A. and M.S. degrees prepare students to pursue graduate study for the doctor- 
ate in English and related fields. The M.S. prepares students to teach on the secondary and 
college levels. The M.A. degree is designed primarily to prepare students for college teaching 
and for admission to doctoral programs. 



1 80 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR M.A. DEGREE IN ENGLISH 
AND AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE 

[f Non-Thesis Option: 30 semester hours required 

1 . Required: ENGL 700, 753, 755 

2. Twelve (12) hrs. from the following: ENGL 631, 650, 652, 653, 654, 656, 658, 660, 
744,760,762,764,766 

3. Nine (9) hrs. from the following: ENGL 603, 628, 631 , 653, 672, 699, 701, 703, 704, 
705, 706, 707, 712, 721, 722, 723, 724, 730, 731, 744 

Thesis Option: 30 semester hours required 

1 . Required: ENGL 700, 753, 755 

2. Nine (9) hrs. from the following: ENGL 631, 650, 652, 653, 654, 656, 658, 660, 744, 
760, 762, 764, 766 

3. Nine (9) hrs. from the following: ENGL 603, 628, 631 , 653, 672, 699, 701 , 703, 704, 
705, 706, 707, 712, 721 , 722, 723, 724, 730, 731, 744 

4. Thesis Research: ENGL 775 (3 semester hours) 

CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR M.S. DEGREE IN ENGLISH EDUCATION 

Non-Thesis Option: 39 semester hours required 

1. Required: ENGL 700, 730, 753, 755 

2. Required: CUIN 619, 711, 721, 728, 729 

3. One African American Literature course from the following: ENGL 631, 650, 652, 
653, 654, 656, 658, 660, 744, 760, 762, 764, 766 

4. One American Literature course from the following: ENGL 628, 631, 653, 672, 721, 
722,723,724,744 

5. One British Literature course from the following: ENGL 699, 701, 703, 704, 705, 
i 706-, 707 

6. One additional three-hour course in African- American, American, or British Litera- 
ture from courses listed in numbers 3, 4, and 5. 

. Thesis Option: 39 semester hours required 

1 . Required: ENGL 700, 730, 753, 755 

2. Required: CUIN 619,711, 721 , 728, 729 

3. One African American Literature course from the following: ENGL 631, 650, 652, 
653, 654, 656, 658, 660, 744, 760, 762, 764, 766 

4. One American Literature course from the following: ENGL 628, 631 , 653, 672, 721, 
722,723,724,744 

5. One British Literature course from the following: ENGL 699, 701, 703, 704, 705, 
706, 707 

6. Thesis Research: ENGL 775 (3 semester hours) 

Courses for Senior Undergraduates and for Graduates 

ENGL 600 Language Variations in American English 

ENGL 603 Introduction to Folklore 

ENGL 626 Children's Literature 

ENGL 627 Literature for Adolescents 

ENGL 628 The American Novel 

ENGL 63 1 Black Women Writers of Africa and the Diaspora 

ENGL 650 African American Folklore 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 181 



ENGL 652 African American Drama 

ENGL 653 Teaching English as a Second Language 

ENGL 654 African American Novel I 

ENGL 656 African American Novel II 

ENGL 658 African American Poetry I 

ENGL 660 African American Poetry II 

ENGL 672 Directed Study in English 

Graduate Courses: Open Only to Graduate Students 

ENGL 699 Medieval Literature 

ENGL 700 Introduction to Critical Theory 

ENGL 701 English Renaissance Literature 

ENGL 703 Seventeenth-Century English Literature 

ENGL 704 Eighteenth-Century English Literature 

ENGL 705 Romantic Literature 

ENGL 706 Victorian Literature 

ENGL 707 Modern British Fiction 

ENGL 710 Language Arts for Elementary Teachers I 

ENGL 7 1 1 Language Arts for Elementary Teachers II 

ENGL 712 Teaching of Freshman Writing 

ENGL 721 Major American Writers I 

ENGL 722 Major American Writers II 

ENGL 723 Modern American Poetry 

ENGL 724 American Multi-Cultural Literature 

ENGL 730 Directed Study in English 

ENGL 731 Technology in Teaching and Research in the Humanities 

ENGL 744 Postcolonial Novel and Theory 

ENGL 753 Introduction to Graduate Literary Studies 

ENGL 754 History and Structure of the English Language 

ENGL 755 Contemporary Practices in Grammar and Rhetoric 

ENGL 760 Non-Fiction by African American Writers 

ENGL 762 Short Fiction by African American Writers 

ENGL 764 African American Aesthetics 

ENGL 766 Seminar in African American Literature and Language 

ENGL 770 Seminar 

ENGL 775 Thesis Research 

ENGLISH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses 

ENGL 600. Language Variations in American English Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a survey of regional and social dialects in the United States and a study of their 
interrelationship; it provides examples of some of the motivations for dialectical divergences, 
especially in the instance of non-standard dialects, and a consideration of functional varieties 
and social dialect shifting. Prerequisite: English 310 or graduate standing. (Demand) 

ENGL 603. Introduction to Folklore Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a basic introduction to the study and appreciation of folklore. (Cross-listed as 
Anthropology 603). (Summer/alternate years) 



i 



j 



B 



182 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



ENGL 626. Children's Literature Credit 3 (3-0) 

Phis course is a study of the types of literature designed especially for students in elementary, 
intermediate, and middle schools. Prerequisites: English 101 , Humanities 200-201 . (Fall; Spring; 
Summer) 

ENGL 627. Literature for Adolescents Credit 3 (3-0) 

Phis course acquaints prospective and in-service teachers with a wide variety of good literature 
that is of interest to adolescents. Emphases are on thematic approach to the study of literature, 
continental writers, book selection, and motivation of students to read widely and indepen- 
dently with depth and understanding. Prerequisite: English 101, 200, and 201 or graduate 
standing. (Fall) 

ENGL 628. The American Novel Credit 3 (3-0) 

Phis course is a history of the American novel from Cooper to Faulkner; Melville, Twain, 
Howells, James, Dreiser, Lewis, Hawthorne, Faulkner, and Hemingway will be included. Pre- 
requisite: English 210. (Demand) 

ENGL 631. Black Women Writers of Africa and the Diaspora Credit 3 (3-0) 

Phis course examines literary texts by black women globally, including Africa, America, the 
Caribbean, and Europe, with a view to understanding, among other things, issues they share in 
common. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

ENGL 650. African American Folklore Credit 3 (3-0) 

Phis course studies folk tales, ballads, riddles, proverbs, superstitions, and folk songs of Afri- 
can Americans. Parallels will be drawn between folklore peculiar to African- Americans and 
that of Africa, the Caribbean, and other nationalities. (Spring) 

ENGL 652. African American Drama Credit 3 (3-0) 

Phis course is a detailed study of the dramatic theory and practice of African American writers 
against the backdrop of Continental and American trends. Special attention will be given to the 
works of major figures from the Harlem Renaissance to the present. Works by Bontemps, Cullen, 
Hughes, Hansberry, Ward, Davis, Baldwin, Baraka (Jones), Gordone, and Bullins will be in- 
cluded. (Demand) 

ENGL 653. Teaching English as a Second Language Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course introduces prospective secondary and college teachers of students learning English 
as a second and/or a foreign language to various pedagogical approaches. The course will 
sxplore theories and practices aimed at second language acquisition involving reading and 
writing. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

ENGL 654. African American Novel I Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is an intensive bibliographical, critical, and interpretative study of novels by major 
African American writers through 1940. Novelists emphasized include Dunbar, Chesnutt, 
Foomer, McKay, Larsen, Hurston, Fauset, and Wright. (Fall) 

ENGL 656. African American Novel II Credit 3 (3-0) 

Phis course is an intensive bibliographical, critical, and interpretative study of novels by major 
Africa American writers after 1940. Novelists emphasized include Wright, Ellison, Baldwin, 
ftimes, Demby, Williams, Walker, Brooks, Petry, Gaines, and May field. (Spring) 

ENGL 658. African American Poetry I Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is an intensive study of African American poetry from its beginning to 1940, with 
special attention given to poets of the Harlem Renaissance. Poets to be studied include Terry, 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 1 83 



Hammon , Wheatley , A .A . Whitman , Horton , Braithwaite , J .W. Johnson , Home , Fenton Johnson , 
Georgia Douglas Johnson, McKay, Cullen, Cuney, and Hughes. (Demand) 

ENGL 660. African American Poetry II Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is an intensive study of African American poetry from 1940 to the present with 
considerable attention given to the revolutionary poets of the sixties and seventies. Poets to be 
studied include Hughes, Walker, F.M. Davis, Brooks, Brown, Hayden, Tolson, Lee, Reed, 
Giovanni, Angelou, Jeffers, Sanchez, Redmond, Fabio, Fields, and Baraka. (Fall) 

ENGL 672. Directed Study in English Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides an opportunity for students to pursue independent and in-depth study in 
literature, linguistics, or professional writing. Work done in literature for this course may serve 
as groundwork for students pursuing the thesis option. Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduate 
or graduate standing and prior consultation with departmental faculty. 

Graduate Students Only 

ENGL 699. Medieval Literature Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a study of the major English writers of the Middle Ages, including Chaucer, 
Malory, Langland, the "Gawain" poet, the "Everyman" playwright, and various other writers 
in the dramatic, religious, lyric, and ballad traditions. (Fall/alternate years) 

ENGL 700. Introduction to Critical Theory Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course outlines and critiques major movements in contemporary literary theory, includ- 
ing, for example, Marxism, feminism, and various poststructuralisms. (Fall) 

ENGL 701. English Renaissance Literature Credit (3-0) 

This course is a study of major prose and poetry, both dramatic and non-dramatic, of the En- 
glish Renaissance. Writers to be studied include More, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, and 
Shakespeare. (Fall/alternate years) 

ENGL 703. Seventeenth-Century English Literature Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a study of major prose and poetry, both dramatic and non-dramatic, of Seven- 
teenth-Century English. Writers to be studied include Jonson, Donne, Bacon, Webster, Marvell, 
Milton, and Dryden. (Summer/alternate years) 

ENGL 704. Eighteenth-Century English Literature Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a study of the major prose and poetry writers of the Eighteenth Century in 
relation to the cultural and literary trends. Dryden, Defoe, Swift, Fielding, Addison, Pope, 
Johnson, and Blake will be included. (Demand) 

ENGL 705. Romantic Literature Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a study of English Romantic writers. Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, 
Shelley, Byron, Hazlitt, DeQuincey, and Lamb will be included. (Spring/alternate years) 

ENGL 706. Victorian Literature Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a study of Nineteenth-Century Victorian writing, including poetry, fiction, and non- 
fictional prose. Writers to be considered will include Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, the Rossettis, 
Carlyle, Mill, Dickens, the Brontes, Eliot, Thackeray, and Hardy. (Spring/alternate years) 

ENGL 707. Modern British Fiction Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a study of English and Irish writers from the beginning of the Twentieth Century 
to the present. Authors to be considered include Joyce, Woolf, Forster, Lawrence, Mansfield, 
and Lessing. (Summer/alternate years) 



1 84 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



ENGL 710. Language Arts for Elementary Teachers I Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is designed to provide elementary school teachers with an opportunity to discuss 
problems related to the language arts taught in the elementary school. (Not accepted for credit 
towards concentration in English.) (Summer/alternate years) 



'\ ENGL 711. Language Arts for Elementary Teachers II Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a continuation of the study of relevant language situations with which elemen- 
tary teachers should be concerned. Emphases will be placed on strategies for guiding pupils to 
explore the nature and structure of language and for teaching essential language skills. (Not 
accepted for credit towards concentration in English.) (Summer/alternate years) 

9 ENGL 712. Teaching of Freshman Writing Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is required of all English graduate teaching assistants (GTAs), and is designed 
solely to provide an academic setting for the theoretical and practical components of teaching 
i English 100 and 101. GTAs will discuss and implement writing assignments, exercises in lit- 
i erature and grammar, and the methods of leading class discussion. (Fall) 

(ENGL 721 . Major American Writers I Credit 3 (3-0) 

;j This course is an intensive bibliographical, critical, and interpretive study of works by major 
\\ American writers through 1900. Writers to be discussed will vary and will include Emerson, 
I Fuller, Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, Clemens, Whitman, Melville, Dickinson, and James, among 
several others. (Fall) 

■iENGL 722. Major American Writers II Credit 3 (3-0) 

| This course is an intensive bibliographical, critical, and interpretive study of works by major 
American writers from 1900 to the present. Writers to be discussed will vary and will include 

i >Stein, Eliot, Hemingway, Faulkner, Toomer, Hurston, Frost, Oates, and Morrison, among sev- 
eral others. (Spring) 

ENGL 723. Modern American Poetry Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is an intensive study of Twentieth-Century American poetry. Special attention will 
"be given to major movements, definitions of modernism, and individual poets. Authors to be 

'considered include Frost, Eliot, Moore, Hughes, Williams, Brooks, and Dove. (Summer) 

! 

ENGL 724. American Multi-Cultural Literature Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will examine the critical and historical perspectives of selected works by Native 
(l American, Asian American, and Hispanic (including American Chicano, Latino, and Puerto 
"■iRican) authors. Writers to be studied include Black Elk, Paula Gunn Allen, Joy Harjo, Louise 
! :Erdrich, N. Scott Momaday, Simon Ortiz, Leslie Marmon Silko, James Welch, Maxine Hong 
.(Kingston, Frank Chin, Amy Tan, Jose Garcia Villa, Rudolfo Anaya, Pat Mora, Tomas Rivera, 
/.Gary Soto, Victor Cruz Hernandez, and Sandra Cisneros. (Summer) 

ENGL 730. Directed Study in English Credit 3 (3-0) 

[This course provides an opportunity for students to pursue in-depth study in literary criticism, 
(iliterature, linguistics, or writing. Also, work done in this course may serve as groundwork for 
.students pursuing the thesis option, developing a portfolio, or acquiring practicum experience. 
'Repeatable once upon approval of departmental chair and/or coordinator of graduate studies in 
English. Prerequisite: approval of, and prior consultation with, instructor. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

[ENGL 731. Technology in Teaching and Research in the Humanities Credit 3 (3-0) 

, This course offers students the opportunity to develop and apply advanced technology in the 

areas of teaching and/or research in the humanities. Applications include the following: virtual 



i Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 185 



reality, hypertext, hypermedia, distance learning, web-enhanced teaching, advanced research 
techniques, and hypertext bibliographies. Prerequisite: approval of instructor. (Spring) 

ENGL 744. Postcolonial Novel and Theory Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course examines postcolonial theory and its application to both postcolonial (including 
the Caribbean, Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, the Balkans, the former republics of the 
Soviet Union, India, Asia, and Oceania) novels and contemporary society, whether local, na- 
tional, or global. (Fall, Spring, Summer) 

ENGL 753. Introduction to Graduate Literary Studies Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course introduces the central research practices of contemporary literary scholarship and 
their purposes and helps students to design individual research projects and acquire the tools 
necessary to bring them to fruition. (Fall) 

ENGL 754. History and Structure of the English Language Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a study of the changes in the English language — syntax, vocabulary, spelling, 
pronunciation, and usage — from the Fourteenth century through the Twentieth century. (De- 
mand) 

ENGL 755. Contemporary Practices in Grammar and Rhetoric Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is designed to provide secondary teachers of English with experience in linguistics 
applied to modern grammar and composition. (Spring) 

ENGL 760. Non-Fiction by African American Writers Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course studies non-fiction by African American writers, including slave narratives, auto- 
biographies, biographies, essays, letters, and orations. (Demand) 

ENGL 762. Short Fiction by African American Writers Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is an intensive examination of short fiction by African American writers. Among 
those included are Chesnutt, Dunbar, Toomer, Hurston, McKay, Hughes, Bontemps, Wright, 
Clarke, Ellison, Fair, Alice Walker, Ron Milner, Julia Fields, Jean W. Smith, Petry, Baldwin, 
Kelley, and Baraka. (Spring/alternate years) 

ENGL 764. African American Aesthetics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course defines those qualities of African American literature that distinguish it from tradi- 
tional American literature through an analysis of theme, form, and technique as they appear in 
a representative sample of works by African- American writers. (Demand) 

ENGL 766. Seminar in African American Literature and Language Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is a topics course that will vary; focus will be on prominent themes and/or subjects treated 
by African American writers from the beginning to the present. An attempt will be made to 
characterize systematically the idiom (modes of expression, style) of African- American writ- 
ers. (Demand) 

ENGL 770. Seminar Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides an opportunity for presentation and discussion of a thesis, as well as 
selected library or original research projects from non-thesis candidates. Prerequisite: 15 hours 
of graduate-level courses in English. (Demand) 

ENGL 775. Thesis Research (Demand) Credit 3 (3-0) 



1 86 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 






Graphic Communication Systems and Technological Studies 

Cynthia C. Gillispie- Johnson, Chairperson 

116 Price Hall 

(336) 334-7550 

http://www.ncat.edu/~gcsts/ 

OVERVIEW 

The Master of Science in Technology Education with concentrations in Technology Edu- 
cation, Teaching; Trade and Industrial Education, Teaching; Workforce Development Director; 
OR Training and Development for Industry provide experiences with advanced concepts, tech- 
nologies, research, and strategies for the preparation of teacher/practitioners. This program 
complies with INTASC, NCATE, DPI, and National Board Certification standards. This pro- 
•gram will prepare graduate students to provide instructional leadership and to capably deliver 
technology education to the public schools and to business and industry of North Carolina. 

OBJECTIVES 

1 1 . To develop advanced competencies in organizing and utilizing technology education strat- 
egies and methods. 

2. To further develop understanding and application of objectives, principles, concepts, prac- 
tices, and philosophies of technology education. 

3. To further develop competencies in organizing, directing, and evaluating technology edu- 
cation programs, courses, and teaching-learning activities. 

4. To develop proficiency in utilizing technological-educational problem solving and research 
techniques in technology education programs. 

5. To further develop depth and/or breadth in technological competencies in the various fields 
of technology education. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Master of Science - Technology Education 

| Concentrations: Technology Education, Teaching 

i Trade and Industrial Education, Teaching 

Workforce Development Director 
L Training and Development for Industry 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

3 

^Admission Criteria 

Criteria for admission are GRE or MAT scores and an undergraduate GPA of 2.5 or better. 
It is the responsibility of the candidate to meet these requirements as well as any other require- 
'ments of the School of Graduate Studies. 

i Non-Licensure Students 

The Class A license is not required for the concentration Training and Development for 
Industry. 

Licensure Only Students 

Candidates who are admitted to graduate studies as licensure only students can not be 
admitted to the Graduate Program until Class A licensure is obtained. After the Class A certifi- 
cate is obtained; application for admission to the graduate program may be pursued. 



. Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 1 87 



DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 



Master's degree candidates must complete a minimum of 39 semester hours of graduate 
level courses, which include: 12 semester hours of professional education courses; 15 semester 
hours of required courses in the thesis or non-thesis option; and 12-semester hours in one of 
four concentrations: Technology Education, Teaching; Trade and Industrial Education, Teach- 
ing; Workforce Development Director or Training and Development for Industry. The two 
Teaching concentrations may lead to Advanced Licensure. The grade point average in the gradu- 
ate program must be 3 .0 or better. 

All majors must pass a Products of Teaching Portfolio due the last full month of the semes- 
ter in which the student graduates. The portfolio must meet the requirements of the North 
Carolina State Department of Public Instruction's performance based licensure. TECH 717 or 
TECH 718 helps the student to establish the portfolio. 

It is the student's responsibility to enroll in TECH 788, Comprehensive Final Exam, in the 
semester he or she intends to graduate. 

It is the student's responsibility to APPLY FOR GRADUATION through the School of , 
Graduate Studies before the deadline posted on the University Calendar in the semester he or , 
she intends to graduate. 

The student must be enrolled the semester he or she plans to graduate. 

The student must be continuously enrolled until the student graduate, and the student must 
complete the degree within 6 years. 

At least fifty percent of the courses counted towards the degree must be numbered 700 and 
above. 

Trade and Industrial Education, Teaching Concentration majors (who lack a continuing 
license in Trade and Industrial Education) may be required to complete up to 600 hours of 
internship in industry in the area of technical specialty if they lack at least that amount of 
relevant, verifiable work experience in the specialty area. This is in addition to the courses 
posted on the program of study. However, this internship may be applied toward two electives 
in the Concentration Courses section of the program of study. 

Documentation of Approvals: (1) Comprehensive Examination passed, (2) Completion of 
Research Project and (3) Completion of Comprehensive Portfolio 

The Curriculum Guide outlines the sequence of required courses and the benchmarks. A 
copy of this guide will be kept in the student's folder in the advisor's office to be updated at 
each advising conference. Advising conferences must be arranged by the candidate prior to 
registration for the next semester. 



CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Excellent employment opportunities exist for persons holding advanced degrees in all 
areas of Technology Education. Public schools in North Carolina and elsewhere are in constant 
need of securing licensed teachers, supervisors, and administrators for technology programs. 
Many career opportunities also exist for Technology Education specialists in occupations that 
do not require state teacher licensure. These persons are employed as teachers, training direc- 
tors, supervisors and managers in post-secondary schools and colleges or in the private sector 
of industry. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



I 



I 



■: 



'aradigm for Master of Science for Technology Education 

Concentrations: Technology Education, Teaching 

Trade and Industrial Education, Teaching 
Workforce Development Director 
Training and Development for Industry 



Professional Education Courses 

XJIN619 Learning Theories 

Advanced Methods 
Diversity Issues in Public Schools 



:uin 721 

CUIN 729 



UUIN 743 or 
1 CUIN 766 

lequired courses 
'CECH 672 
^ECH 762 
ECH 767 
^ECH 768 
'^ECH 769 
^ECH 788 

Ul students must 

<M1 students must 

] 

bR 

I 

lequired courses 
TECH 672 
tECH 762 
TECH 767 
CECH 717/718 
tECH 768 
fECH 788 

m students must 
Ml students must 



Foundations or Instr. Tech. or Distance Ed. 
sub total 

for Thesis Option 

Curriculum Development in Technological Education 
Evaluation of Technological Education Programs 
Research and Literature in Technological Education 
Technological Seminar (abide by university deadlines for the thesis) 
Thesis Research (abide by university deadlines) 
Comprehensive Final Examination (take the last semester; date 
announced in class) 

apply for graduation by the deadline in their last semester. 
turn in their portfolios by the last full month of their last semester, 
sub total 

for Non-thesis Option 

Curriculum Development in Technological Education 
Evaluation of Technological Education Programs 
Research and Literature in Technological Education 
Special Problems I/II 
Technological Seminar 

Comprehensive Final Examination (take the last semester; date 
announced in class) 

apply for graduation by the deadline in their last semester. 
turn in their portfolios by the last full month of their last semester, 
sub total 



3sh 


3sh 


3sh 


3sh 


12 sh 


3sh 


3sh 


3sh 


3sh 


3sh 



Osh 



15 sh 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

Osh 



15 sh 



Concentration in Technology Education, Teaching 

/Select 12 semester hours from the following list. Each course in the list is 3 semester hours.) 



TECH 608 
fECH 617 
TECH 618 
TECH 619 
FECH 620 
r ECH621 
TECH 622 
TECH 623 
'ECH 626 



Study of Technology 

Introduction to Coordination of Industry and Education Partnerships 

Technological Education for Special Needs Students 

Construction Systems for Technological Education 

Manufacturing Systems for Technological Education 

Communication Systems for Technological Education 

Transportation Systems for Technological Education 

Research and Development in Technological Education 

Curriculum Modification in Technological Education for Special Needs 

Population 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



189 



TECH 664 Occupational Exploration for Middle Grades 

TECH 665 Middle Grades Industrial Laboratory 

TECH 669 Safety in the Instructional Environment of Technological Education 

TECH 682 Computer Applications for Education and Industrial Training 

TECH 715 Advanced Research and Development Practices for Technological Education 

TECH 717 Special Problems I 

TECH 7 1 8 Special Problems II 

TECH 73 1 Advanced Graphic Techniques 

TECH 763 Technological Education for Elementary Grades 

TECH 770 Systematic Design of Training and Development Programs 

GCS 630 Multimedia and Videography 

GCS 63 1 Advanced Computer Aided Design 

GCS 632 Graphic Animation 

GCS 634 Advanced Multimedia and Videography 

GCS 635 Advanced Principles of Graphic Communications Technology 

GCS 636 Electronic Imaging and Distance learning 

GCS 670 Electronic Imaging and Graphic Communication 

GCS 719 Seminar in Computer Aided Drafting and Design 

GCS 733 Graphic Communication Systems Organization and Management 



1 



l 



;'( 



Concentration in Trade and Industrial Education, Teaching 

(Select 12 semester hours from the following list. Each course in the list is 3 semester hours 

GCS 601 Advanced Flexography Methods 

GCS 610 Internship in Industry I 

GCS 611 Internship in Industry II 

GCS 630 Multimedia and Videography 

GCS 631 Advanced Computer Aided Design 

GCS 632 Graphic Animation 

GCS 633 Advanced Machine Design and Drafting 

GCS 634 Advanced Multimedia and Videography 

GCS 635 Advanced Principles of Graphic Communications Technology 

GCS 636 Electronic Imaging and Distance Learning 

GCS 644 Advanced Architectural Drafting and Design 

GCS 670 Electronic Imaging and Graphic Communication 

GCS 719 Seminar in Computer Aided Drafting and Design 

GCS 731 Advanced Graphic Techniques 

GCS 733 Graphic Communication Systems Organization and Management 

TECH 660 Career Development and Work-based Learning 

TECH 661 Workforce Development Program Planning and Management 

TECH 663 History and Philosophy of Technological Education 

TECH 664 Occupational Exploration for Middle Grades 

TECH 665 Middle Grades Industrial Laboratory 

TECH 669 Safety in the Instructional Environment of Technological Education 

TECH 670 Introduction to Workplace Training and Development 

TECH 67 1 Methods and Techniques of Workplace Training and Development 

TECH 682 Computer Applications for Education and Industrial Training 

TECH 717 Special Problems I 

TECH 7 1 8 Special Problems II 

TECH 770 Systematic Design of Training and Development Programs 

CUIN 605 Concepts in Career Education 



) 



i 



190 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future] V 



Concentration in Workforce Development Director 

Select 12 semester hours from the following list. Each course in the list is 3 semester hours.) 

3CS 610 Internship in Industry I 

3CS 611 Internship in Industry II 

jCS 719 Seminar in Computer Aided Drafting and Design 

TECH 660 Career Development and Work-based Learning 

TECH 661 Workforce Development Program Planning and Management 

TECH 663 History and Philosophy of Technological Education 

TECH 669 Safety in the Instructional Environment of Technological Education 

rECH 7 1 7 Special Problems I 

FECH 7 1 8 Special Problems II 

TECH 764 Administration and Supervision of Technological Education 

\DED 773 Leadership 

rUIN 612 Instructional Design 

HUIN 709 Administration and Supervision 

I!UIN 723 Principles of Teaching 

Concentration in Training and Development for Industry 

Select 12 semester hours from the following list. Each course in the list is 3 semester hours.) 

3CS 610 

jCS611 

TECH 663 

rECH 669 

FECH 670 

FECH 671 

FECH 682 

rECH 717 

rECH 718 

rECH 764 

rECH 766 

rECH 770 

VDED714 

VDED 773 

\DED 776 

^DED 777 

\DED 778 

\DED 779 



Internship in Industry I 

Internship in Industry II 

History and Philosophy of Technological Education 

Safety in the Instructional Environment of Technological Education 

Introduction to Workplace Training and Development 

Methods and Techniques of Workplace Training and Development 

Computer Applications for Education and Industrial Training 

Special Problems I 

Special Problems II 

Administration and Supervision of Technological Education 

Curriculum Laboratories in Industrial Settings 

Systematic Design of Training and Development Programs 

The Community College and Post-secondary Education 

Leadership 

Principles of College Teaching 

Seminar in Higher Education 

Student Personnel Services 

Technical Education in Community Colleges 

TOTAL: 39 



*Iote: GCS 667 Independent Studies in Technological Education I and GCS 668 Independent 
Studies in Technological Education II may be substituted for selected courses with consent of 
\dvisor. 



* Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



191 



COURSES WITH DESCRIPTION IN GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION 
SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGICAL STUDIES 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 






GCS-601. Advanced Flexographic Methods Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course is designed to develop advanced proficiency in flexographic printing. It includes 
the prediction of future flexographic markets, products, substrates, inks, solvents, and industry 
standards for color processing. 

TECH-608. Study of Technology Credit 3 (2-2 

This course emphasizes contemporary methods of developing problem solving skills through} 
the four technologically adaptive systems (communications, construction, manufacturing, trans- 
portation), mathematics and science. 

TECH-610. Internship in Industry I Credit 3 (0-7 

Students participate in an industrial setting during a semester in their major field of interest 
They will be evaluated during the internship and keep a field diary of events and experiences 
Three semester hours is the maximum hours to be earned during a semester. 

TECH-611. Internship in Industry II Credit 3 (0-7 

Students participate in an industrial setting during a semester in their major field of interest 
They will be evaluated on reports from industry and a field diary of events and experiences 
Three semester hours is the maximum hours to be earned during a semester. 

TECH-617. Introduction to Coordination of Industry and Education 

Partnerships Credit 3 (3-0 

This course examines the interrelationship, organizational structure, and logistics of industry 
and education partnerships. Topics include establishing guidelines, developing networks, coor- 
dinating personnel, supervising participants, and evaluating performance. 

TECH-618. Technological Education for Special Needs Students Credit 3 (3-0 

Opportunities are provided for teachers, counselors, and administrators to improve their skills 
in working with disadvantaged/handicapped learners in technological education. Emphasis wilj 
be placed on motivational and creative instructional strategies, discipline, drug awareness, anc 
module development. 

TECH-619. Construction Systems for Technological Education Credit 3 (2-2 

The evolution of construction and construction systems on human and societal developmen 
will be discussed. Teaching strategies regarding construction systems including design, engi 
neering, site preparation, foundations, superstructure, mechanical systems, and clearing anc 
finishing the structure will be studied. Laboratory activities will be included appropriate foi 
secondary, post-secondary, and industrial settings. 

TECH-620. Manufacturing Systems for Technological Education Credit 3 (2-2 

This course will cover the organization, product design, and production systems associatec | 
with manufacturing. It will emphasize teaching strategies and curriculum development in relaj E 
tion to manufacturing systems. Laboratory activities will be included appropriate for secondary 
post-secondary, and industrial settings. 



TECH-621. Communication Systems for Technological Education Credit 3 (2-2 

This course studies the communication systems model and its application to sending and re 
ceiving messages. Topics include planning and producing graphically and electronicall) 



1 92 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Futun 



;enerated messages to individual and mass audiences. Laboratory activities will be included 
ppropriate for secondary, post-secondary, and industrial settings. 

TECH-622. Transportation Systems for Technological Education Credit 3 (2-2) 

trhe significance of the evolution of transportation and transportation systems on human and 

ocietal development will be studied. Topics include the role of land, air, water, space, and 

Energy systems on rural, urban, and suburban lifestyles. Laboratory activities will be included 

impropriate for secondary, post-secondary, and industrial settings. 

I 

fECH-623. Research and Development in Technological Education Credit 3 (2-2) 

irhis is a synthesis-based course where students research problems relative to any one of the 
pour technological systems (Communications, Transportation, Construction, Manufacturing) 
liuid develop solution(s) to the identified problem(s). The interrelationship among the four tech- 
nological systems will be explored. Laboratory activities will be included as appropriate for 
j secondary, post-secondary, and industrial settings. 

TECH-626. Curriculum Modification in Technological Education for 

Special Needs Populations Credit 3 (3-0) 

'[[his course examines program modifications for disadvantaged/handicapped learners in tech- 
lological education. Topics include curriculum adaptation, instructional planning, teaching 
.itrategies, media development, and performance assessment for special needs learners. 

j GCS-630. Multimedia and Videography Credit 3 (2-2) 

'irhis course covers the development and utilization of multimedia presentations and videography 
in the educational environment. Topics include principles of composition, planning, editing, 
md producing multimedia presentations appropriate for educational or industrial settings. Com- 
puters and software packages will be used to develop the presentations. 

jffcS-631. Advanced Computer- Aided Design Credit 3 (2-2) 

ifhis course focuses on developing knowledge and skill with computer software used with 
solid modeling and the use of computer software to generate these models. Emphasis will also 
.pe placed on the creation of wire-frame and surface models. Analysis, fabrication and docu- 



nentation of these models will be addressed. 



GCS-632. Graphic Animation Credit 3 (2-2) 

'This course deals with the creation and manipulation of computer generated geometric shapes 
and models. Topics include creation of 3D scenes, assignment of materials, lights and textures, 
fey framing, rendering, and animation. 

GCS-633. Advanced Machine Design and Drafting Credit 3 (2-2) 

'IIThis course covers advanced drafting and design techniques associated with machine componets 
'nnd assembly. Topics include tool design and material selection, work-holding principles, de- 
sign of jigs, fixtures and press working tools, inspection and gaging, joining processes, modular 
tooling, and economics of design. 

foCS-634. Advanced Multimedia and Videography Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course provides advanced strategies and techniques in the development of multimedia 
Presentations and videography. State of the art equipment will be used in addition to computers 
?und software packages to produce professional presentations. 

i jCS-635. Advanced Principles of Graphic Communications Technology Credit 3 (2-2) 
^Advanced principles in graphic reproduction. Study of color applications, photographic appli- 
cations, design and pre-press techniques. Technical experiences in reproduction methods and 
Quality control. 

J Jncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 193 



GCS-636. Electronic Imaging in Distance Learning Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course integrates the strategies and techniques of electronic imaging into distance learn- 
ing applications. Areas of emphasis include Web page development and management unique to 
distance learning delivery systems for the Internet. 

GCS-637. Industrial and Customer Relations in Graphic 

Communications Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on industrial and customer relations within the field of graphic communi- 
cations. Responsibilities and duties of the manager and his/her relationship to higher-level 
supervisors, subordinates, associates and customers are examined. Emphasis is placed on de- 
veloping skills essential for persuasive communication. 

GCS-644. Advanced Architectural Drafting and Design Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course covers advanced drafting and design techniques associated with the building in- 
dustries. Topics include the development of working drawings, site plans, elevations, sections, 
and details in accordance with building codes. Upon completion the student should be able to 
plan and develop architectural drawings that comply with accepted architectural standards and 
procedures . 

TECH-660. Career Development and Work-based Learning Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers implementation strategies for various work-based learning programs that 
will prepare youth to enter the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on going beyond the class- 
room into the community to develop workplace knowledge and skills. 

TECH-661. Workforce Development Program Planning and Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers principles and strategies of program planning and management for workforce 
development. Emphasis will be placed on scheduling, federal and state regulations, procedures 
and special issues. 

TECH-662. Technological Education Course Construction Credit 3 (3-0) 

Selecting, organizing, and integrating objectives, content, media and materials appropriate to 
technological courses will be discussed. Topics include strategies and techniques of designing 
and implementing group and individual teaching-learning activities, constructing teacher made 
instructional aides and devices, and curriculum planning and design. 

TECH-663. History and Philosophy of Technological Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course examines the chronological and philosophical development of technological edu- 
cation with special emphasis on its growth and function in American schools. 

TECH-664. Occupational Exploration for Middle Grades Credit 3 (3-0) 

Designed for persons who teach or plan to teach middle grades occupational exploration pro- 
grams. Emphasis will be placed on occupational exploration in the curriculum, sources and 
uses of occupational information, approaches to middle grades teaching, and philosophy and 
concepts of occupational education. 

TECH-665. Middle Grades Industrial Laboratory Credit 3 (3-0) 

Course organization, teaching strategies, resource and facilities for teaching industrial-techno- 
logical career exploration in Middle Grades is stressed. Emphasis is on occupational clusters in 
manufacturing, construction, communication, transportation, fine arts, and public service. 

GCS-667. Independent Studies in Technological Education I Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course involves intensive study in the field of technological education under the direction 
of a faculty advisor. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate studies coordinator. 



1 94 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



a 



[jGCS-668. Independent Studies in Technological Education II Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course involves intensive inquiry in the field of technological education under the direc- 
tion of a faculty advisor. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate studies coordinator. 

TECH-669. Safety in the Instructional Environment of Technological 

Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

(This course examines the principles and techniques of organizing and supervising safety in 
technological education. Topics include instructional strategies, state and national laws, spe- 
cial hazards, color coding, and accident analysis. 

i'GCS-670. Electronic Imaging in Graphic Communication Credit 3 (2-2) 

Theory, principles and practices of electronic non-impact printing are investigated in class. 
(Students will be given opportunities to explain, visit and utilize current non-impact printing 
systems through visits to industrial settings, classroom projects and special demonstrations. 

fTECH-670. Introduction to Workplace Training and Development Credit 3 (3-0) 

Overview of the field of training and development. Management concerns related to organiz- 
ing, operating, and financing training and development programs are discussed. Roles common 

to practitioners across the broad field of Human Resource Development are covered. Interper- 
sonal perspectives and implications for the future are included. 

'TECH-671. Methods and Techniques for Workplace Training and 

Development Credit 3 (3-0) 

Emphasis on the methods and techniques common to exemplary training programs. Designing 
^earning programs and selecting appropriate media methods and resources using sound theo- 
retical framework is the goal. Evaluation of programs and instruction is discussed. 

a ITECH-672. Curriculum Development Using Microcomputers in 

Technological Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will focus on the theory, principles, concepts and philosophy of curriculum devel- 
opment. Topics include utilization of microcomputers, creation of learning activity packages, 
land integration of resources. 



s ITECH-682. Computer Applications for Education and Industrial Training Credit 3 (2-2) 
This course deals with strategies and techniques for the utilization of the computer for net- 
working, videoconferencing, and distance learning. It also covers satellite and teleconferencing 
in addition to information services and the Internet as vehicles to assist in the educational 
process. 

| GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 

'1TECH-715. Advanced Research and Development Practices for 

f Technological Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

[This course is concerned with research and problem-solving related to technical subsystems of 
technological education. Emphasis is placed on research procedure and techniques, innova- 
tions or inventions, and the results from the research. 



flTECH-717. Special Problems I Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is an advanced study in modern technology that deals with recent developments, 
trends, practices and procedures in industries. Learning activities include individual and group 
research and experimentation involving selection, design, development, and evaluation of tech- 
nical reports and instructional materials. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 195 



TECH-718. Special Problems II Credit 3 (3-0) jfi 

Individual study related to modern technology including research and experimentation involv 
ing selection, design, development, and evaluation of instructional materials will be the focus j 'd 
of this course. 

TECH-719. Seminar in Computer Aided Drafting and Design Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course surveys the CADD software packages currently used in industrial and educational 
fields. It explores the uses and applications of these packages, and covers the transfer of data 
across platforms. Strengths of various software packages for special situations are emphasized. 

GCS-731. Advanced Graphical Techniques Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course is designed to study the applications of American National Standards Institute 
(ANSI) and International Standards Organization (ISO) drafting standards, computer aided A 
graphical problem-solving techniques, drafting methods in certain specialty areas, and differ- 
ent conventions related to tolerancing. Use of literature and research is expected. 

GCS-733. Graphic Communications Organization and Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course discusses formal and informal organizations, group dynamics, motivation, and 
managing conflict and change. Emphasis will be placed on different management practices and 
leadership styles as they relate to satisfaction and morale, organizational effectiveness, produc- 
tivity, and profitability in the graphic communications industry. 

TECH-762. Evaluation of Technological Education Programs Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course examines standards, criteria, and strategies for evaluating technological education 
curricula, facilities, personnel, and programs. Activities include designing and conducting. 

TECH-763. Technological Education for Elementary Grade Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course includes the rationale, philosophy, concepts, curricula, resources, learning activi- 
ties, methods, and evaluation for technological education in the elementary grades. 

TECH-764. Supervision and Administration of Technological Education Credit 3 (3-0) 
This course examines the relationship of technological education to the general curriculum and 
the administrative responsibilities involved. Courses of study, costs, coordination problems, 
class and laboratory organization, and the development of an effective program of supervision 
will be emphasized. 

TECH-765. Evaluation of Training in Industrial Settings Credit 3 (3-0) 

Study and application of principles of evaluation in industrial training settings. Emphasis is 
placed on test construction, measurement techniques, and evaluation results. 

TECH-766. Curriculum Laboratories in Industrial Settings Credit 3 (3-0) 

Development and preparation of instructional materials for industrial classroom use. Students 
select and develop significant areas of instruction for use in industrial settings. Modularized 
instruction that relates to industrial settings is studied for use and application in the private 
sector of business and industry. Opportunities are provided for review of actual industrial train- 
ing materials. 

TECH-767. Research and Literature in Technological Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course studies research techniques applied to technical and educational papers and thesis 
classification of research. Topics include selection of subjects; delineation and planning of 
procedures; collection, organization and interpretation of data; and review of literature in tech- 
nological education. 



196 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future \\ ( 



^ECH-768. Technological Seminar Credit 3 (3-0) 

his course is designed to enable non-thesis graduate majors to conclude educational and tech- 
xal investigations. Each student is expected to plan and complete a research paper and present 
isummary of the findings to the seminar. Prerequisite: TECH 767. 



m 



CH-769. Thesis Research Credit 3 (3-0) 



[ECH-770. Systematic Design of Training and Development Programs Credit 3 (3-0) 
his course covers the strategic design factors of training and development programs. How to 
;velop estimates of return on investment is covered. 

fECH-788. Comprehensive Examination Credit (0-0) 

Jinrolling in this course is how one registers for the required comprehensive final exam. 



ncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 1 97 



Graphic Communication Systems MSIT-Master of Science in Industrial Technology jpR 



The School of Technology at North Carolina A&T State University offers a MSIT- Master 1C01 
of Science in Industrial Technology (Graphic Communication Systems) degree. This degree 
program is coordinated by the Department of Manufacturing Systems and is designed to in-l$ 
crease students' understanding of industrial management challenges in an array of technical ^ 
areas and to explore effective methods for dealing with accelerated technological changes. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

The MSIT (Graphic Communication Systems) degree program, within the School of Tech 
nology, requires the GRE General Test as part of the admission process. A minimum score is'GC 
not required at this time. Please contact the Graduate School Office for more information. <GC 

'ft 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 'IE 

j 
The MSIT (Graphic Communication Systems) degree program is built upon the compe-'Tfl 

tencies achieved at the baccalaureate level in the graphic communication systems curriculum GC 

and thus enables students to secure applications oriented "technical-management" positions in K 

today's industrial environment. The objectives of the program are: 

1 . To provide quality competency-based instruction so that men and women will be prepared 
to enter the fields of graphic communication systems. 

2. To assist majors in developing those critical competencies in the sciences, communica- 
tions, mathematics, and technical specialties essential to securing positions in related in- 
dustrial, business and government careers. 

3. To develop adequate problem solving, critical thinking, oral, and written communication 
skills. 

4. To apply the use of various high technologies, e.g., computer-aided drafting and design 
(CADD), integrated internet technologies, flexography, and lithography. 



TARGET AUDIENCE AND CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

This program is designed to serve the diverse needs of persons who are interested in pur- 
suing careers in technology. Included in this group are the following: (1) persons currently 
employed in industrial management positions and have professional growth aspirations; (2) 
individuals recently completing their undergraduate study and want additional preparation prior 
to embarking on a career in industry; and (3) students interested in entering an advanced gradu- 
ate degree program (Ph.D., Ed.D., etc.) and whose ultimate goal is university teaching and/or 
research. Graduates of the program should be able to perform more creatively and competently 
in leadership roles involving planning, problem solving, and decision-making. Additionally, 
the program is designed to enhance student competencies in the areas of research and scholarly 
writing. 

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY (GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS) 

A total of 36 hours is required for the Master of Science in Industrial Technology. The total 
consists of 12 SH of Core Courses, 6 SH of Management Electives, 9 SH of Technical 
Electives and 9 SH of Required Courses. 



,\; 



1 98 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



PROGRAM CURRICULA (All courses are 3 credit hours) 

l^ore Courses (12 credit hours) 

»vISIT 610 Problem Solving in Industrial Technology 

VISIT 673 Industrial Productivity Measurement and Analysis 

MSIT 700 Concepts of Technological Innovations 

vTSIT 740 Leadership Development Seminar 

Graphic Communication Systems and Technological Studies 

vlanagement Electives- (6 credit hours) 

GCS 637 Industrial and Customer Relations in Graphic Communications 

1 3CS 733 Graphic Communications Organization & Management 

■ TECH 670 Introduction to Workplace Training and Development 

TECH 671 Methods & Techniques of Workplace Training & Development 

Technical Electives- (9 credit hours) 

ijCS 601 Advanced Flexographic Methods 

1 3CS 630 Multimedia and Videography 

3CS 63 1 Advanced Computer-Aided Designed 

I jCS 632 Graphic Animation 

i jCS 633 Advanced Machine Design and Drafting 

1 3CS 634 Advanced Multimedia and Videography 

■GCS 635 Advanced Principles of graphic Communications Technology 

GCS 636 Electronics Imaging in Distance Education 

jGCS 644 Advanced Architectural Drafting and Design 

GCS 668 Independent Studies in Technological Education 

iGCS 670 Electronics Imaging in Graphic Communication 

GCS 719 Seminar in Computer- Aided Drafting and Design 

. 3CS 731 Advanced graphic Techniques 

3CS 788 Comprehensive Examination (0 credit hours) 

TECH 7 1 7 Special Problems I 

TECH 7 1 8 Special Problems II 

Required Courses (9 hours) 



JVon-Thesis Option 

( MSIT 750 Internship I 

,MSIT751 Internship II 

;MSIT 789 Master's Project 

'■Thesis Option 

MSIT 780 Statistical and Research Methods in Industrial Technology II 

MSIT791 Thesis I 

MSIT 792 Thesis II 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 199 



COURSES WITH DESCRIPTION IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 
Manufacturing Systems 

MSIT-610. Problem Solving in Industrial Technology Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course teaches the fundamentals of problem solving as they are applied to an industrial 
technology environment. Included are analytical as well as creative problem solving techniques. 
Industrial projects within assigned teams are required. 

MSIT-673. Industrial Productivity Measurement and Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

Study of work measurement and method analysis towards establishing work standards and 
measuring productivity in industries. 

MFG-700. Concepts of Technological Innovations Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will provide instruction in the concepts of technological innovations. Contempo- 
rary issues are also explored. 

MSIT-740. Leadership Development Seminar Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is an experiential seminar designed for assessment of the individual's managerial strengths 
and weaknesses in a manufacturing management position. Current and evolving leadership 
issues will be discussed and leadership models will be presented. Managerial and leadership 
issues in high participation work places will be stressed. Students will participate in behavioral 
simulations and receive psychometric feedback. 

MSIT-750. Internship I Credit 3 (0-6) 

This course is designed to provide students with an internship experience in an industrial envi- 
ronment related to their technical discipline. Students must be employed full-time for one 
semester. Evaluation will be based on reports from the student's industrial supervisor and the 
university coordinator. Prerequisite: 15 hours graduate credit. 

MSIT-751. Internship II Credit 3 (0-6) 

This course is designed to provide students with an additional semester of internship experi- 
ence related to their technical discipline. 

MSIT-789. Master's Degree Project Credit 3 (3-0) 

The master's degree project is designed to be a culminating experience for the master's degree. 
It is applications oriented and focuses on an actual project related to the student's technical 
discipline. The course is intended to integrate the learning from the classes taken in the degree 
program. Prerequisite: 24 hours graduate credit. 

MSIT-791. Thesis I Credit 3 (3-0) 

The student will select a research topic that is of special interest and approved by his/her gradu- 
ate thesis advisor. Prerequisite: MSIT 790 or consent of advisor. 

MSIT-792. Thesis II Credit 3 (3-0) 

The student may enroll in this course to complete approved research for the thesis. Prerequi- 
sites: MSIT 790, MSIT 791 or consent of advisor. 



200 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Graphic Communication Systems and Technological Studies 

I GCS-601. Advanced Flexographic Methods Credit 3 (1-4) 

This course is designed to develop advanced proficiency in flexographic printing. It includes 
the prediction of future flexographic markets, products, substrates, inks, solvents, and industry 
standards for color processing. 

GCS-630. Multimedia and Videography Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course covers the development and utilization of multimedia presentations and videography 
in the educational environment. Topics include principles of composition, planning, editing, 
and producing multimedia presentations appropriate for educational or industrial settings. Com- 
puters and software packages will be used to develop the presentations. 

GCS-631. Advanced Computer- Aided Design Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course focuses on developing knowledge and skill with computer software used with 
solid modeling and the use of computer software to generate these models. Emphasis will also 
be placed on the creation of wire-frame and surface models. Analysis, fabrication and docu- 
mentation of these models will be addressed. 

GCS-632. Graphic Animation Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course deals with the creation and manipulation of computer generated geometric shapes 
and models. Topics include creation of 3D scenes, assignment of materials, lights and textures, 
vkeyframing, rendering, and animation. 

GCS-633. Advanced Machine Design and Drafting Credit 3 (2-2) 

IThis course covers advanced drafting and design techniques associated with machine compo- 
ments and assembly. Topics include tool design and material selection, work-holding principles, 
'design of jigs, fixtures and press working tools, inspection and gaging, joining processes, modular 

tooling, and economics of design. 

GCS-634. Advanced Multimedia and Videography Credit 3 (2-2) 

!This course provides advanced strategies and techniques in the development of multimedia 
presentations and videography. State of the art equipment will be used in addition to computers 
and software packages to produce professional presentations. 

1 GCS-635. Advanced Principles of Graphic Communications Technology Credit 3 (2-2) 
Advanced principles in graphic reproduction. Study of color applications, photographic appli- 
cations, design and pre-press techniques. Technical experiences in reproduction methods and 
quality control. 

(GCS-636. Electronic Imaging in Distance Learning Credit 3 (2-2) 

i This course integrates the strategies and techniques of electronic imaging into distance learn- 
i ing applications. Areas of emphasis include Web page development and management unique to 
i distance learning delivery systems for the Internet. 

(GCS-637. Industrial and Customer Relations in Graphic 

Communications Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on industrial and customer relations within the field of graphic communi- 
cations. Responsibilities and duties of the manager and his/her relationship to higher-level 
supervisors, subordinates, associates and customers are examined. Emphasis is placed on de- 
veloping skills essential for persuasive communication. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 20 1 



GCS-644. Advanced Architectural Drafting and Design Credit 3 (2-2) j * 

This course covers advanced drafting and design techniques associated with the building in- 
dustries. Topics include the development of working drawings, site plans, elevations, sections, 
and details in accordance with building codes. Upon completion the student should be able to 
plan and develop architectural drawings that comply with accepted architectural standards and 
procedures. 

GCS-667. Independent Studies in Technological Education I Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course involves intensive study in the field of technological education under the direction 
of a faculty advisor. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate studies coordinator. 

GCS-668. Independent Studies in Technological Education II Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course involves intensive inquiry in the field of technological education under the direc- 
tion of a faculty advisor. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate studies coordinator. 

GCS-670. Electronic Imaging in Graphic Communication Credit 3 (2-2) 

Theory, principles and practices of electronic non-impact printing are investigated in class. 
Students will be given opportunities to explain, visit and utilize current non-impact printing 
systems through visits to industrial settings, classroom projects and special demonstrations. 

GCS-731. Advanced Graphical Techniques Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course is designed to study the applications of American National Standards Institute 
(ANSI) and International Standards Organization (ISO) drafting standards, computer aided 
graphical problem-solving techniques, drafting methods in certain specialty areas, and differ- 
ent conventions related to tolerancing. Use of literature and research is expected. 

GCS-733. Graphic Communications Organization and Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course discusses formal and informal organizations, group dynamics, motivation, and 
managing conflict and change. Emphasis will be placed on different management practices and 
leadership styles as they relate to satisfaction and morale, organizational effectiveness, produc- 
tivity, and profitability in the graphic communications industry. 

GCS-788. Comprehensive Examination Credit (0-0) 

Enrolling in this course is how one registers for the required comprehensive final examination. 

TECH-670. Introduction to Workplace Training and Development Credit 3 (3-0) 

Overview of the field of training and development. Management concerns related to organiz- 
ing, operating, and financing training and development programs are discussed. Roles common 
to practitioners across the broad field of Human Resource Development are covered. Interper- 
sonal perspectives and implications for the future are included. 

TECH-671. Methods and Techniques for Workplace Training 

and Development Credit 3 (3-0) 

Emphasis on the methods and techniques common to exemplary training programs. Designing 
learning programs and selecting appropriate media methods and resources using sound theo- 
retical framework is the goal. Evaluation of programs and instruction is discussed. 

TECH-717. Special Problems I Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is an advanced study in modern technology that deals with recent developments, 
trends, practices and procedures in industries. Learning activities include individual and group 
research and experimentation involving selection, design, development, and evaluation of tech- 
nical reports and instructional materials. 



202 



rECH-718. Special Problems II Credit 3 (3-0) 

ndividual study related to modern technology including research and experimentation involv- 
ng selection, design, development, and evaluation of instructional materials will be the focus 
»f this course. 

TECH-719. Seminar in Computer Aided Drafting and Design Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course surveys the CADD software packages currently used in industrial and educational 
ields. It explores the uses and applications of these packages, and covers the transfer of data 
icross platforms. Strengths of various software packages for special situations are emphasized. 

rECH-770. Systematic Design of Training and Development Programs Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers the strategic design factors of training and development programs. How to 
develop estimates of return on investment is covered. 



Jncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 203 



Human Performance and Leisure Studies 



Deborah J. Callaway, Chairperson 
Suite 215 Corbett Gymnasium 

(336)334-7719 
http://www.ncat.edu/~schofed/ 

OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Human Performance and Leisure Studies (HPLS) offers an advanced 
graduate program of study leading to a Master of Science in Physical Education degree. The 
purpose of the advanced program of study is to prepare public school practitioners and profes- 
sionals to take leadership roles in the areas of teaching and research through an interdiscipli- 
nary and standards-based graduate curriculum. Specifically, the objectives of the program are 
the following: 

1 . To provide an advanced level of study in the areas of teaching and research in physical 
education and related fields. 

2 . To provide students with advanced competencies in developing , implementing , and evalu- 
ating quality programs of physical activities for a wide range of diverse population. 

3. To further develop technological competencies in physical education and related fields. 

DEGREE OFFERED 

Master of Science in Physical Education 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to the graduate degree program is consistent with the general 
admission requirements of the School of Graduate Studies. Students applying to graduate study 
in the Department of Human Performance and Leisure Studies must also satisfy the following 
criteria for admission in the program: 

• A Bachelor's degree in Physical Education or a related field from an accredited institution 

• Three (3) letters of recommendation 

• Overall minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.60 for non-teaching and 2.80 for the teaching 
options. 

• Official scores on GRE (Graduate Record Examination) or the MAT (Miller Analogies 
Test) taken during the last five (5) years, and 

• A goal statement 

A student wishing to be accepted as a candidate for the Teaching option must hold a Class 
"A" teaching certificate. In addition, candidates wishing to be certified in teaching physical 
education may register "certification only" students. All other post baccalaureate students (PBS) 
must have approval from the department chair for admission. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

The Department of Human Performance and Leisure Studies provides an advanced level 
of study in two tracks: teaching and non-teaching. The teaching track has three areas of con- 
centration, namely (a) teacher education, (b) adapted physical education, and (c) sport psychol- 
ogy. Similarly, the non-teaching tract has the same concentrations EXCEPT teacher education. 
Additionally, the program offers a Teaching Licensure Only/Lateral Entry option. 

The student may elect to take thirty-six (36) hours of course work and write a thesis for 
three (3) hours credit in order to satisfy the requirements of thirty-nine (39) total hours. The 
student may also elect not to write a thesis and take an additional three (3) credit hours research 
seminar course (HPED 798) to complete the required thirty-nine (39) total credit hours. 

204 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Non-Teaching - A student may complete the Master's Degree in the non-teaching option 
without meeting state licensure requirements for teaching. This option is designed for indi- 
viduals working in the field or related fields where a teaching license is not required. This 
[option will not lead to any form of teacher licensure. 

Licensure Only - The Licensure Only option is available to those individuals wishing to 

satisfy North Carolina teaching licensure requirements. Individuals must possess an earned 

undergraduate degree and must remove undergraduate deficiencies at the beginning of his/her 

graduate studies. Students pursuing licensure must apply for admission to the Teacher Educa- 

i tion Program and pass Praxis II prior to pursuing student teaching. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

I 

j An advanced degree in physical education provides content for students preparing for 
I careers in the public schools, college and junior college teaching, research, public service and 
further academic advancement. 

GRADUATE COURSE OFFERRINGS 

HPED 700 Evaluation of Atypical Motor Performance 3 

HPED 721 Current Problems and Trends in Physical Education 3 

HPED 723 Supervision in Health and Physical Education 3 

HPED 731 Exercise Physiology 3 

HPED 732 Sport Psychology 3 

HPED 733 Motor Learning and Performance 3 

HPED 734 Applied Sport Psychology 3 

HPED 735 Sport Psychology Practicum 3 

HPED 742 Administration of Interscholastic and Intercollegiate Athletics 3 

i HPED 760 Program Development in Adapted Physical Activity 3 

B HPED 76 1 Early Childhood Adapted Physical Activity 3 

1 HPED 762 The Teaching of Adapted Physical Activity 3 

I HPED 784 Research Statistics for Physical Education 3 

1 HPED 786 Scientific Foundations of Human Movement 3 

I HPED 798 Research Seminar 3 

1 HPED 799 Thesis 3 

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN PERFORMANCE AND LEISURE STUDIES 

GRADUATE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

I HPED-700. Evaluation of Atypical Motor Performance Credit 3 (2-2) 

' This course is designed to study the various methods of assessing and evaluating atypical mo- 
ttor performance. Emphasis is placed on ecological based data collection, interpretation, and 
i instruction. A practicum is required. 

I HPED-721. Current Problems and Trends in Physical Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

I This course is designed for experienced teachers to address problems in teaching and coaching 
I on all educational levels. Trends and the future direction of the profession will be addressed 
,i through research and class discussion. 

II 



jji Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 205 



HPED-723. Supervision in Health and Physical Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is an in depth-study of management theories and policies applicable to the admin- 
istration of Health and Physical Education classes at all levels from elementary through higher 
education. The planning, implementing and evaluating of classroom activities are emphasized. 

HPED-731. Exercise Physiology Credit (2-1) 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the application of principles 
and theories of physiology as it applies to the physical training and conditioning of athletes for 
sports participation. 

HPED-732. Sport Psychology Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is the study of current and classical theories of sport psychology as applied to 
human performance. Emphasis is placed upon motivation, attention, anxiety, human factors 
and cognitively based psychological skills training programs 

HPED-733. Motor Learning and Performance Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is the study of current theories and principles of human motor behavior as applied 
to the acquisition and analysis of motor skills. Emphasis will be placed upon learning concepts, 
practice, arousal, methodology, transfer and distribution. 

HPED-734. Applied Sport Psychology Credit (3-0) 

This course involves current research theories and practices in applied sport psychology, spe- 
cifically sport specific psychology programs , generally involving psychological skills training 
with competitive sport participants. 

HPED-735. Sport Psychology Practicum Credit (2-2) 

This course provides supervised experiences in the organization, administration and evaluation 
of applied sport psychology programs, generally involving psychological skills training with 
competitive sport participants. 

HPED-742. Administration of Interscholastic and Intercollegiate Athletics Credit 3 (3-0) 
This course is designed to provide management theories and principles for the organization 
and administration of interscholastic and intercollegiate athletics. The components of budget- 
ing, scheduling, staffing, coordination, planning and legal liability will be thoroughly discussed. 

HPED-760. Program Development in Adapted Physical Activity Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course is designed to study various approaches in developing adapted physical education 
programs for individuals with disabilities, with emphasis on an ecological approach. Content 
focus is placed on inclusion, diversity, and non-categorical elements of program development, 
implementation, and evaluation. A practicum is required. 

HPED-761. Early Childhood Adapted Physical Activity Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course focuses on the planning, implementation and evaluation of inclusive motor devel- 
opment programs for very young children with special needs. Emphasis is placed on current 
practices in assessment and programming, family involvement, and playground safety. A 
practicum is required. 

HPED-762. The Teaching of Adapted Physical Activity Credit 3 (1-4) 

This course is designed to study and apply various instructional approaches to the teaching of 
adapted physical education in an inclusive setting. Emphasis is placed on instructional styles 
and strategies, organizational techniques, and teaching effectiveness within an ecological frame- 
work. Internship is required. 



206 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



HPED-784. Research Statistics for Physical Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is designed to give the student a sound foundation in the principles and applica- 
tions of various statistical methods as they relate to conducting and evaluating research in 
'Physical Education. The course includes descriptive statistics, probability theory, sampling 
distribution, inferences about means and standard deviations, hypothesis testing, regression, 
correlation, Chi-square and non-parametric methods. 

HPED-786. Scientific Foundations of Human Movement Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is designed to discuss and explore the scientific base and approaches to studying 
human movement, including ethical decision making in human movement research. 

HPED-798. Research Seminar Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is designed to provide the students with a culminating experience by conducting 
Writing and presenting a research project to a forum of students and faculty. Prerequisites: 
luiN 711, PHED 784, PHED 786 and completion of 50% of the course of studies. 

jHPED-799. Thesis Credit 3 (3-0) 

An in-depth research project in the area of physical education. Each student will have an advi- 
sor and Thesis Committee, in accordance with the procedures within the Graduate School, who 
will provide guidelines in the completion of the study. Each student will present his/her find- 
sings and will provide a successful defense before the Thesis Committee. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 207 



History 

Olen Cole, Jr., Chairperson 
324 Gibbs Hall 

(336)334-7831 i 

coleo@ncat.edu 

OBJECTIVES 

The Master of Science program builds upon the knowledge and skills already mastered by 
teachers at the undergraduate level . The required 1 5 hours of advanced professional core courses 
and the 24 hours of courses in the content area provide opportunities for teachers to advance 
their knowledge of pedagogy and content. Courses in content and the professional education j 
core are designed to connect with and enhance what teachers are actually doing in their class- 
rooms. The role, use, integration, and application of technology in the planning and teaching 
process are also emphasized. The major goal is to produce social studies educators, teachers, 
leaders, and scholars, who are catalysts for learning. 

DEGREE OFFERED 

Master of Science - History Education 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the general requirements specified in the description of the degree program 
in Education, a student wishing to be accepted as a candidate for the degree of Master of 
Science in Education with a concentration in History must hold or be qualified to hold a Class 
A teaching certificate in History or Social Studies. If a person does not qualify for certification, 
appropriate undergraduate or graduate courses may be taken to correct this deficiency. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

The skills and knowledge learned in history and social science courses can lead to careers 
in education, journalism, business, archives and museums, international affairs, and govern- 
ment service, among others. The M.S. Degree Program in History Education prepares students 
for classroom teaching in secondary schools. Businesses also find that teacher education gradu- 
ates make good human relations specialists, personnel directors, technical writers, sales man- 
agers, directors of training programs, and administrators. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

To complete the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Education with a 
concentration in History, the student may elect the thesis option or the non-thesis option. A 
comprehensive examination is required in History as well as in Education. Students must main- 
tain a grade point average of 3.0. 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 

Required History Content Area Courses 24 hours 

HIST 735 Historiography (3) 

HIST 610 Seminar in the History of Twentieth Century Technology (3) 

HIST 730 Seminar in History (3) 

HIST (United States History) (3) 

HIST (European History (3) 



208 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



I 



MIST (Courses/Non-Western History/minorities) (6) 

^Social Science Elective (Non-Thesis Option) (3) 
HIST 750 Thesis in History (Thesis Option) (3) 

Professional Education Core Courses 15 hours 

1 . CUIN 6 1 9 Learning Theories (3) 

2. CUIN 721 Advanced Methods (3) 

3 . CUIN 729 Diversity Issues in K- 1 2 Public Schools (3) 

4. CUIN 711 Methods and Techniques of Research (3) 
CUIN 728 Integrating Technology into the K-12 Curriculum (3) 



OTHER REQUIREMENTS 

II . Research Project or Thesis 
2. Performance-Based Portfolio 
53. Comprehensive Examination 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES OF THE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION WITH A CONCENTRATION IN HISTORY 

Students in the M.S. degree program in History Education are provided the opportunity to: 

1 . Acquire advanced knowledge of pedagogical and thematic subject matter standards of the 
social studies curriculum. 

:2. Acquire advanced knowledge of major historiographical schools of thought and signifi- 
cant periods of history. 

|| . Become more aware of the contributions of historical and social science research to policy 

i analysis and decision making. 

14. Understand how students differ in their approaches to learning and be able to create teach- 
ing and learning strategies that address the needs of diverse learners. 

5. Understand the impact of various groups, institutions, and nations on global history and 
development. 

6. Improve performance and practice through self-evaluation, reflection, and applied research. 

7. Understand how to select appropriate objectives consistent with state and local curriculum 
guide lines, the learning needs of students, and the standards established by the National 
Council of Social Studies and Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consor- 
tium (INTASC). 

*&. To demonstrate instructional leadership as an individual and collaboratively. 

I History Courses 

I HIST 600 The British Colonies and the American Revolution 

I HIST 603 Civil War and Reconstruction 

4 HIST 605 Twentieth Century Russian History 

iHIST 606 United States History, 1900-1932 

1 HIST 607 United States History, 1 932-Present 

1 HIST 610 Seminar in the History of Twentieth Century Technology 

I HIST 615 Seminar in African- American History 

1 HIST 616 Seminar in African History 

l HIST 617 Readings in African History 

! HIST 618 The African Diaspora 

HIST 620 Seminar in Asian History 

HIST 621 Seminar in Latin American and Caribbean History 

HIST 622 History of Asian Women 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 209 



HIST 623 Topics in East Asian Culture 

HIST 626 Revolutions in the Modern World 

HIST 628 The Civil Rights Movement 

HIST 629 Seminar on the History of Early Modern Europe 

HIST 630 Seminar in European History, 1815-1914 

HIST 631 Studies in Twentieth Century Europe, 1914 to the Present 

HIST 633 Independent Study in History 

HIST 701 Recent United States Diplomatic History 

HIST 703 The Pacific War 

HIST 712 Twentieth Century African- American History 

HIST 730 Seminar in History 

HIST 735 Historiography 

HIST 740 History, Social Science, and Contemporary World Problems 

HIST 750 Thesis in History 

Geography Courses 

GEOG 640 Topics in Geography of the United States and Canada 

GEOG 64 1 Topics in World Geography 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR HISTORY 

HIST-600. The British Colonies and the American Revolution Credit 3 (3-0) 

The planting and maturation of the English colonies of North America. Relationships between 
Europeans, Indians, and transplanted Africans, constitutional development, religious ferment, 
and the colonial economy are studied. 

HIST-603. Civil War and Reconstruction Credit 3 (3-0) 

Causes as well as constitutional and diplomatic aspects of the Civil War, the role of the Afri- 
can-American in slavery, in war, and in freedom; and the socio-economic and political aspects 
of Congressional Reconstruction and the emergence of the New South are studied. 

HIST-605. Twentieth Century Russian History Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is a reading, research, and discussion course that examines history of Twentieth century 
Russia with special emphasis on the Russian Revolution, the development of Communist soci- 
ety, the impact and legacy of Stalin, relations with the United States and other countries during 
the Cold War, the demise of the Soviet Union, and current problems facing post-Soviet Russia. 

HIST-606. U.S. History, 1900-1932 Credit 3 (3-0) 

Emphasizes political, economic, social, cultural and diplomatic developments from 1900 to 
1932 with special attention to their effect upon the people of the United States and their influ- 
ence on the changing role of the U.S. in world affairs. 

HIST-607. U.S. Since 1932-Present Credit 3 (3-0) 

With special emphasis on the Great Depression, New Deal, the Great Society, and the expand- 
ing role of the United States as a world power, World War II, Cold War, Korean and Vietnam 
conflicts are studied. Major themes include the origin, consolidation, and expansion of the 
New Deal, the growth of executive power, the origins and spread of the Cold war, civil liber- 
ties, and civil rights, and challenges for the extension of political and economic equality and 
the protection of the environment. 



210 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



IIST-610. Seminar in the History of Twentieth Century Technology Credit 3 (3-0) 
dreading, research, and discussion that investigates the development and, especially, the im- 
pact of major Twentieth century technologies. Attention will also be given to the process of 
nvention, the relationship between science and technology, and the ethical problems associ- 
ated with some contemporary technologies. 

HST-615. - Seminar in African-American History Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is a reading, research, and discussion course that concentrates on various aspects of the 
ife and history of African- Americans. The emphasis is placed on historiography and major 
hemes including nationalism, black leadership and ideologies, and economic development. 

UIST-616. Seminar in African History Credit 3 (3-0) 

Research, writing, and discussion on selected topics in African history. 

IIIST-617. Readings in African History Credit 3 (3-0) 

By arrangement with instructor.) 

UIST-618. The African Diaspora Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is an advanced reading, research, and discussion course on the historical experience of 
)eople of African descent in a global context. It examines the worldwide dispersal and dis- 
placement of Africans over time, emphasizing their migration and settlement abroad over the 
>ast five centuries. 

LIIST-620. Seminar in Asian History Credit 3 (3-0) 

Research, writing, and selected topics in Asian history. 

HIST-621. Seminar in Latin American and Caribbean History Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course requires research, writing, and discussion of selected topics in Latin American and 
Caribbean History including, urban and rural conflicts, social revolution, race relations, prob- 
ems of underdevelopment, and contemporary issues. 

HIST-622. History of Asian Women Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course first briefly examines the conditions of Asian (especially South Asian and East 
Asian) women in traditional societies and then focuses on the changes in women's status in 
modern times (since 1800). It covers primarily the following topics: women and economic 
modernization (especially the impact of industrialization on women), the impact of the intro- 
duction of Western ideas (such as feminism) on women, women and wars (revolutions)-especially 
in China, Korea, and Vietnam, women and crimes, women's political participation, and gender 
gelations. 

HIST-623. Topics in East Asian Culture Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course first aims at illuminating some key features of East Asian culture, especially in 
modern times. It is concerned with East Asians' belief on a variety of issues (e.g., human 
relations, man-nature relations, state-society relations, and health) and the changes of these 
beliefs in the context of Western influence. Considerable attention will be given to such major 
[intellectual schools as Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism. 

HIST-626. Revolutions in the Modern World Credit 3 (3-0) 

A seminar course stressing comparative analysis of revolutions and revolutionary movements 
in the Unites States, France, Russia, China, Cuba, and Iran. Students will also evaluate theories 
af revolution in light of historical examples. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 211 



HIST-628. The Civil Rights Movement Credit 3 (3-0) 

From original research, class lectures, and discussions, students will become familiar with the 
nature of the Civil Rights Movement; will evaluate its successes and failures; and will analyze 
the goals and tactics of each major participating Civil Rights organization. Students will also 
evaluate the impact of the Civil Rights Movement on American society. 

HIST-629. Seminar on the History of Early Modern Europe Credit 3 (3-0) 

Through extensive readings, discussion, research, and writing, students will examine selected 
topics of enduring importance in the history of Europe from the Renaissance through the French 
Revolution. 

HIST-630. Studies in European History, 1815-1914 Credit 3 (3-0) 

Intensive study of selected topics in Nineteenth Century European history. 

HIST-631. Studies in Twentieth Century Europe, 1914-Present Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course offers an intensive study of key topics in Twentieth century European history, 
including World Wars I and II, the Russian Revolution, Hitler and the Holocaust, the Depres- 
sion, the Cold War and bipolarism, the Welfare State, the Common Market, the collapse of 
Communism in Eastern Europe, and current problems. 

HIST-633. Independent Study in History Credit 3 (3-0) 

(By arrangement with instructor.) 

HIST-701 . Recent United States Diplomatic History Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course examines episodes in the history of American foreign relations that were especially 
important in influencing persistent patterns of this nation's role in international relations. Pos- 
sible examples studied: Pearl Harbor, the Cold War, Korean War, Cuban missile crisis, Vietnam, 
nuclear arms limitation, and black Africa. 

HIST 703. The Pacific War Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course examines the origins, conduct, and consequences of the Pacific War, which was an 
important part of World War II. The course will discuss the rise of Japan as a world power and 
its expansion in East Asia, particularly in China, and Southeast Asia. The course will also 
explore why and how Japan came into military conflict with the United States in the Pacific 
region, which resulted in the collapse of the Japanese colonial empire. (F;S;SS) 

HIST-712. Twentieth Century African-American History Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course involves research, reading, discussion, and analysis of major facets of African- 
American life in the United States from 1900 to the present. It requires a major research paper. 

HIST-730. Seminar in History Credit 3 (3-0) 

Topics to be selected by students and instructor. Includes a major research project. 

HIST-735. Historiography Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will examine historians and their philosophical and methodological approaches to 
the study of history and recent developments in analysis and theory. Overviews of the funda- 
mental issues and debates in the fields of history will be discussed. Basic computer skills will 
also be emphasized. 

HIST-740. History, Social Science, and Contemporary 

World Problems Credit 3 (3-0) 

Readings, discussions, and reports on the relationships between history and the social sciences 
as a whole, as well as their combined roles in dealing with contemporary world problems. 



212 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 






IHIST-750. Thesis in History Credit 3 (3-0) 

iIThesis work will be done with the appropriate instructor in accordance with field of interest. 



CUIN-725. Problems and Trends in Teaching the Social Sciences Credit 3 (3-0) 

Current strategies, methods, and materials for teaching the social sciences. Emphasis on inno- 
vations, evaluation and relation to learning. Provision for clinical experiences. 



( 

i COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR GEOGRAPHY 

I 

( GEOG-640. Topics in Geography of the United States and Canada Credit 3 (3-0) 

r ; Selected topics in cultural geography of the United States and Canada are studied intensively. 
{Emphasis is placed upon individual reading and research and upon group discussion. 



GEOG-641. Topics in World Geography Credit 3 (3-0) 

Selected topics in geography are studied intensively. Concern is for cultural characteristics and 
their interrelationships with each other and with the habitat. Emphasis is upon reading, re- 
search, and discussion. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 213 



Human Development and Services 



Wyatt D. Kirk, Chairperson 
212 Hodgin Hall 
(336) 334-7916 
kirkw@ncat.edu 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the Department of Human Development and Services are to prepare 
individuals for professional roles in Adult Education, Counseling, and School Administration. 
Departmental studies include philosophical, theoretical, and methodological foundations for h 
adult educational and counseling practices; practical examination of human development and 
learning through the life span, supervised experience in practice settings and leadership prepa- 
ration for schools and other educational organizations in a diverse and technological society. 

Departmental graduates pursue professional careers within a diversity of human services 
settings, including schools, post-secondary and higher education, public and private counsel- 
ing centers, rehabilitation agencies, community education and development, services adminis- 
tration, corrections, human resource development/training, health education, and university 
extension programs. School Administration graduates work in administrative positions at the 
school building level, and/or assume positions with local, state, and national organizations that 
focus on educational issues in professional development, curriculum, research or policy mak- 
ing. Graduates of School Administration are eligible for licensure from the North Carolina 
State Department of Public Instruction (SDPI) and may qualify the individual for administra- 
tion certification in other states. 

Although many participants are enrolled in full-time graduate study, the Department wel- 
comes practicing professionals who choose to pursue their studies on a part-time basis. Course 
work in the Department is generally offered in the evenings to accommodate the professional 
development needs of practicing adult educators, counselors, and school administrators. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Master of Science Degree in Adult Education 

Master of Science Degree in Counselor Education 

Master of Science Degree in Human Resources (Community /Agency) 

Master of Science Degree in Human Resources (Rehabilitation Counseling) 

Master of Science Degree in School Administration 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The Department of Human Development and Services at North Carolina A&T State Uni- 
versity accepts and reviews applications for admission twice a year. Deadlines for counseling 
applications are April 1st for fall admissions and November 1st for spring admissions. Adult 
Education deadlines are ongoing for fall and spring admissions. 

School Administration program deadlines are March 1st for fall admissions and Novem- 
ber 1st for spring admissions. Persons applying for graduate study in the Department must 
obtain an application for admittance from the School of Graduate Studies. Prospective 
kirk@ncat.edu students must complete and forward the application including submission of 
three letters of recommendation to the Graduate School. 

The applicants packet will be reviewed by the Graduate School and the admissions commit- 
tee of the Department of Human Development and Services. Applicants may be requested to 
participate in a pre-admissions interview with departmental faculty. The admissions decision is 



214 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



lade at the department level, and is based on the recommendation of the admissions committee 
nd approval by the Departmental Chairperson. 

Persons applying for graduate study within Departmental Programs should have an overall 
mdergraduate GPA of 3.0 or higher on a 4 point system; and 2.8 on a 4.0 scale for School 
administration ^Primary factors in the admissions decision include academic background, dem- 
onstrated professional and volunteer experience appropriate to Departmental programs of study, 
;tters of recommendation or reference forms and official transcripts of all prior academic work. 

The GRE is not required for admission unless the Departmental Admissions Committee 
scommends a student take it. However, persons applying for graduate study in counseling 
aay be required to take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) and have these scores sub- 
litted to the graduate school as a part of the application process, if asked to do so by the 
departmental Admissions Committee. GRE scores will be considered in the overall admis- 
sions decision. The GRE requirement does not apply to adult education master's candidates. If 
pproved, applicants who do not meet minimum GPA requirements may be admitted to Depart- 
nental programs on the weight of other factors. School Administration applicants are required 
b present GRE or MAT (Miller Analogies Test) scores that are not more than five (5) years old. 
est of English as a Foreign Language is required for international students. 

Applicants for graduate study in Adult Education who have creditable professional and/or 
1 olunteer experience in adult education practice are encouraged to submit a brief portfolio in 
Addition to, and in support of, the resume. The portfolio would include samples of original 
Vork (i.e. workshops, presentations, publications) from employment or volunteer experience 
i.e. voluntary organizations, church). The portfolio will be considered in the overall admis- 
ions decision as evidence of applicable professional and volunteer experience. 

For a complete copy of the admissions policy, contact the department office. Faculty rec- 
immendations are preferred; however, employer recommendations may be submitted if you 
re unable to obtain a faculty recommendation. A current resume and professional portfolio 
ihould be submitted to: 

North Carolina A&T State University 

School of Graduate Studies 

ATTN: Admissions 

120 Gibbs Hall 

Greensboro, NC 27411 

DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS 

Adult Education majors must successfully complete a minimum of 36 credit hours of 
approved graduate study. The program of study is composed of a professional core curriculum 
onsisting of 21 graduate semester hours, including a faculty supervised practicum experience, 
.nd a minimum of 15 semester hours in a research or practice concentration. The concentration 
entails graduate research and cognate studies in an adult education specialty (thesis option) or 
.n adult education practice concentration (non-thesis option). The concentration (thesis or non- 
ihesis) is determined by the participant in collaboration with his or her faculty advisor and is 
jubject to approval by the Department Chair. Practice concentrations are currently designated 
in Community Education, Human Resource Development, Higher Education, and Instructional 
rechnology. 

As a culminating experience, the Research Concentration (Thesis Option) participant must 
esearch and write a master's thesis in the field of adult education under the supervision of his/ 
ler major advisor, and defend it before a departmental Thesis Research Committee. Practice 
Concentration (Non-Thesis Option) participants must complete a four-hour master's compre- 
hensive examination administered by the Department. In addition to serving Departmental 
naster's candidates, students enrolled in master's programs other than Adult Education, as 
veil as holders of master's degrees who are not currently engaged in graduate study, may 

Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 215 



a 



enroll, with administrative approval, in Adult Education professional core courses or concen- 
trations to augment their studies and professional development. 

Counseling majors must complete 60 hours of graduate work with the Rehabilitation Coun- 
seling track. The program of study is composed of a professional core curriculum consisting of 
48 graduate semester hours, including a faculty supervised practicum experience and two 300 
hour internships, in addition to a minimum of 12 semester hours of electives. The electives 
allow graduate students the opportunity to develop specialties in the counseling profession. 
Students will not be allowed to take the Counseling Comprehensive Examination unless all 
professional core courses have been taken excluding HDSV 765, 780 and 790. i 

There are four tracks as options in the counseling curriculum. The Community /Agency 
Counseling track prepares students for a variety of counseling careers in the public and private 
sector, including post-secondary education settings. The School Counseling track prepares stu- 
dents for counseling positions in elementary, middle, and high schools. The Human Resources 
Rehabilitation Counseling track prepares students for positions in a variety of rehabilitation 
settings. 

The Human Resource (Rehabilitation Counseling) program is designed to prepare cul- 
turally competent counselors who specialize in counseling persons with disabilities. The 48 
hour counseling program has the following objectives: (1) increasing the student's knowledge 
and skills regarding the role and function of rehabilitation counselors, (2) preparing rehabilita- 
tion counselors who function ethically and competently in a multicultural context, and (3) 
increasing the number of underrepresented minority counselors trained in rehabilitation coun- 
seling. Graduates of the Rehabilitation Counseling track pursue credentials as a Certified Re- 
habilitation Counselor (CRC), a National Certified Counselor (NCC), and a Licensed 
Professional Counselor (LPC). Rehabilitation Counselors are employed in the following set- 
tings: (a) public/private rehabilitation agencies, (b) community rehabilitation programs, (c) 
private practice, (d) non-profit rehabilitation agencies, (e) rehabilitation hospitals, (f) correc- 
tional facilities, (g) mental health centers, (h) independent living centers, (i) half way houses, 
and (j) substance abuse facilities. Beginning Fall 2005, the Rehabilitation Counseling program 
will offer a 12 hour concentration in Rehabilitation Administration for students desiring addi- 
tional preparation for leadership roles within rehabilitation settings. 

The Master of School Administration Degree Program is designed to prepare individuals 
to lead schools and other educational organizations in a diverse and technological society. Comple- 
tion of this program leads to eligibility for licensure from the North Carolina State Department 
of Public Instruction and may qualify the individual for administration certification in other 
states. Graduates of this program will work in administrative positions at the school building 
level, and/or assume position with local state and national organizations that focus on educa- 
tional issues in professional development, curriculum, research or policy making. 

Program Objectives 

The objectives of the program are to: 

• Prepare leaders who are visionary, reflective, and collaborative managers with schools, ' re l 
business and the community. 

• Prepare leaders for school administration and leadership in local, state, regional, and na 
tional educational organizations. 

• Prepare leaders who know how to conduct research and use data analysis in problem solv- 
ing and decision-making. 

• Prepare leaders who demonstrate knowledge of curriculum, assessment, use of technol 
ogy, and are reflective in their practice. 

• Prepare leaders with the skills to respond to gender, equity, and quality issues. 

• Prepare leaders who are ethically sensitive and open-minded. 



216 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Prepare leaders who are responsive to social, political, and economic change. 

Provide individuals the opportunity to demonstrate leadership skills, apply theoretical 

knowledge and demonstrate appropriate dispositions. 

^egree 

All students enrolled in the Master of School Administration Degree Program must suc- 
^ssfully complete 42 hours of study including 30 hours in the major and 12 hours in a field 
'ased internship and internship seminar. A maximum of 6 hours of graduate transfer credits 
Vith a grade of "B" or higher may be accepted toward completion of the degree. Transfer 
tedits must be at the graduate level for a grade, within the last five years, and may not have 
feen used to fulfill the requirements for another master's degree. 

Students admitted to the Master of School Administration Degree Program will be as- 
! :gned to a cohort group through the registration process. There will be separate cohort groups 
m full-time and extended time students. Students may choose either a full-time or extended 
me program of study. Full-time students must complete the program within a two-year pe- 
!od, including the yearlong internship. Extended time students must complete the program 
Hthin a three-year period including summers and the yearlong internships. 
ii 

Admission Requirements 

I Submit a formal application to the School of Graduate Studies, North Carolina Agricul- 
tural and Technical State University. 

I Hold a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree from an accredited college or 
university in this country or the equivalent in an accredited institution outside the United 
States. 

Have an undergraduate grade point average of 2.8 on a 4.0 scale. 
Present GRE or MAT (Miller Analogies Test) scores that are not more than five (5) years 

, old. 

Have a minimum of four (4) years of successful teaching experience and hold a Perfor- 
mance based North Carolina Teaching Certificate. 

J Provide three letters of academic recommendations. 

I Participate in an interview to determine knowledge of relevant education issues, insight 

I into problems of schooling, and level of oral communication skills. 

I Present a portfolio of educational and professional artifacts. 

I Provide a writing sample in response to a leadership case study problem. 

Financial Assistance 



The North Carolina Principal Fellows Program is a scholarship loan program funded by 
ae North Carolina General Assembly and based upon academic merit (financial need is not a 
onsideration) to assist individuals in earning the master's degree in school administration in 
.(reparation for a career in school administration. Each scholarship loan will provide up to a 
vo-year scholarship in the amount of twenty thousand dollars ($20,000) per year to support 
udents who enroll in and complete a full-time two-year masters degree program in school 
iiministration at a participating institution. 



uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 217 



Internship Requirements 

You must be enrolled as a full-time graduate student (9 hours minimum) and serve as a 
full-time intern in a public school during the second year as a Principal Fellow. While serving 
as an intern, Principal Fellows receive a stipend, in addition to the scholarship loan, equal to 
the 0-4 steps on the state salary schedule for assistant principals (contingent on funding from 
the General Assembly). 

Information may be obtained by contacting : 

Dr. Karen F. Gerringer 

North Carolina Principal Fellows Program 

P.O. Box 2688 

Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27515-2688 

(919) 962-4575 



PROGRAM OF STUDY FOR THE M.S. IN ADULT EDUCATION 



Professional Core (21 credit hours) 

ADED 707 Foundations of Adult Education 

ADED 708 Methods in Adult Education 

ADED 709 Adult Development and Learning 

ADED 700 History and Philosophy of Adult and Continuing Education 

ADED 701 Organization, Administration, & Supervision of Adult 

Education Programs 
ADED 716 Qualitative Research in Adult and Continuing Education 

ADED 702 Practicum and Seminar in Adult Education 

(50 contact hours or more) 

Prerequisites: completion of 21 credit hours including 15 hours 

of professional core courses, or permission of the instructor. 

Concentration (15 hours minimum) 
Research Concentration (Thesis Track) 

HDSV 707 Applied Research 

Comparable Research Design Course 
ADED 705 Thesis Research in Adult Education 

Approved Electives 

In lieu of taking the master's comprehensive examination, 

thesis students will defend their completed research before 

their respective faculty advisory committee. 

Practice Concentration (Non-Thesis Track) 

Electives to comprise a practice concentration 

In consultation with his/her advisor, the student may elect 

to pursue a designated practice concentration (below), or develop 

a unique concentration from among university-wide course 

offerings that is tailored to his/her career interests and goals. 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 



Credits 

3 
3 
6 
6 



15 



218 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



PRACTICE CONCENTRATIONS 



Adult Education 

In consultation with their advisors, non-thesis students individually develop practice con- 
centrations within adult education. 



Recommended Courses for Practice Concentrations 

Community Education 

ADED 77 1 Program Development in Community Education 

ADED 772 Program Management in Community Education 

ADED 711 Gerontology 

ADED 712 Developmental Adult Education 

One Approved Elective 



Higher Education 
ADED 776 
ADED 714 
ADED 778 
ADED 773 



Principles of College Teaching 

The Community College 

Student Personnel Services 

Leadership 

One Approved Elective 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Human Resource Development 

ADED 710 Foundations of Human Resource Development 

CUIN 612 Instructional Design 

CUIN 714 Instructional Technology Services for Business and Industry 

TECH 670 Introduction to Workplace Training and Development 

TECH 67 1 Methods and Techniques of Workplace Training and Development 

Instructional Technology 



CUIN 742 
CUIN 617 



i CUIN 716 
i CUIN 742 

i Course Offerings 
, ADED 700 
, ADED 701 

, ADED 702 
, ADED 703 
- ADED 704 
. ADED 705 
. ADED 706 

ADED 707 

ADED 708 

ADED 709 

ADED 710 

ADED 711 



Instructional Design 3 

Computers in Education 3 

Elective (3) 

Elective (3) 

One Elective Below: 

Media Center Management 3 

Instructional Design 

in Adult Education 

History and Philosophy of Adult and Continuing Education 3 (3-0) 
Organization, Administration and Supervision 

of Adult/Continuing Education Programs 3 (3-0) 

Practicum and Seminar in Adult Education 3 (1-4) 
Seminar on Contemporary Issues in Adult Continuing Education 3 (3-0) 

Independent Study 3 (3-0) 

Thesis Research in Adult Education 6 (6-0) 

Special Problems in Adult Education 3 (3-0) 

Foundations of Adult Education 3 (3-0) 

Methods in Adult Education 3 (3-0) 

Adult Development and Learning 3 (3-0) 

Foundations of Human Resource Development 3 (3-0) 

Social Gerontology • 3 (3-0) 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



219 



ADED 712 Developmental Adult Education 3 (3-0 

ADED713 Literacy in the Black Diaspora 3(3-0 

ADED 714 The Community College and Postsecondary Education 3(3-0 

ADED 715 Women in Adult Education 3 (3-0 

ADED 716 Qualitative Research in Adult Education and 

Continuing Education 3 (3-0 

ADED 759 Computer Applications in Adult Education 3 (3-0 

ADED 771 Program Development: Community Education 3 (3-0 

ADED 772 Program Management: Community Education 3 (3-0 

ADED 773 Leadership 3(3-0 

ADED 774 The Changing Environment of Human Resources Development 3 (3-0 

ADED 775 Learning Interventions for Human Resources Development 3 (3-0 

ADED 776 Principles of College Teaching 3 (3-0 

ADED 777 Seminar in Higher Education 3 (3-0 

ADED 778 Student Personnel Services 3 (3-0 

ADED 779 Technical Education in Community Junior Colleges 3 (3-0 

ADED 785 A Independent Readings in Education I 1 (0-2 

ADED 786A Independent Readings in Education II 2 (0-4 

ADED 787A Independent Readings in Education III 3 (0-6 

ADED 790A Seminar in Education Problems 3 (3-0 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN ADULT EDUCATION 

ADED-700. History and Philosophy of Adult and Continuing Education Credit 3 (3-0) 1 

This is a study of historical and philosophical foundations and thought utilized in the analysis 1 

of adult education teaching and learning. The evolution of adult education as a discipline is I 
studied from a multicultural perspective. 

ADED-701 . Organization, Administration and Supervision of Adult/ 

Continuing Education Programs Credit 3 (3-0) J 

This course is an examination of theories, concepts and practices as they relate to administra- ] 
tive functions: planning, organizing, staffing, financing, motivating, decision-making, evaluating I 

and delegating in an Adult Education organization. 1 

I 
ADED-702. Practicum and Seminar in Adult Education Credit 3 (1-4) 1 

This course engages participants in a supervised field experience with an agency, business, I 
institution or organization, to enable praxis of adult education theory and methodology. The J 
seminar provides for shared reflection, integration, and discussion of theoretical, methodologi- I 
cal implementation and experiences. The practicum experience consists of (50) clock hours. I 
This course is graded as a pass/fail. Prerequisites: Twenty-one (21) graduate credit hours in- I 
eluding 18 hours of professional core courses, or permission of instructor. 

ADED-703. Seminar on Contemporary Issues in Adult 

Continuing Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is integrative in nature, thereby offering the student an opportunity to synthesize 

ADED-704. Independent Study Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course permits a participant to develop and execute a learning contract with the instructor 
to analyze a problem in adult education through supervised study, outside the classroom set- 
ting. The problem may be selected from the scholarly literature of adult education or the 
professional workplace. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. 



220 Uncompromising Excellence : A Blueprint for the Future 



VDED-705. Thesis Research in Adult Education Credit 6 (6-0) 

Original graduate level research in adult education is carried out by the adult learner under the 
supervision of the thesis research committee chairperson and leading to completion of the 
Master's Thesis. This course is available only to thesis option participants. This course is graded 
is pass/fail. Prerequisites: Thirty (30) graduate credit hours including ADED 716 or HDSV 
770 or comparable research design course, or permission of the instructor. 

\DED-706. Special Problems in Adult Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

special topics, individual and group study projects, research, workshops, seminars, travel study 
ours and organized visitations in areas of adult education planned and agreed upon by partici- 
pating students may be included in this course. 

ADED-707. Foundations of Adult Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

lTliis course will introduce and address the philosophical, sociological and psychological foun- 
dations of adult education, and develop a view of the subject as a broad, diverse, and complex 
:ield of study, research, and professional practice. Students will survey many institutions, pro- 
grams, and individual activities. The range of methods and materials used to enable adults to 
earn will be discussed. 

U)ED-708. Methods in Adult Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course addresses adult education methodology and learning in formal, non-formal, and 
nformal settings. Attention is given to adult education philosophical perspectives and teaching 
styles and their implications for methodology. 

^DED-709. Adult Development and Learning Credit 3 (3-0) 

IThe social and psychological contexts of learning, motivation and educational participation 
will be examined. Major theories of adult development and learning, and their implications for 
orofessional practice will be explored through readings, small group and whole class discus- 
sion, and inquiry team projects. This course is appropriate for any educators and human services 
professionals who work with adults including college, university, and other postsecondary edu- 
cators and counselors, adult secondary educators, community services providers, trainers and 
luman resource developers. 

\DED-710. Foundations of Human Resource Development Credit 3 (3-0) 

Human Resource Development (HRD) is concerned with the human resources within both 
oublic and private sector organizations, and is defined as the integrated use of employee train- 
ing and development, organization development, and career development, to improve individual, 
'group, and organizational effectiveness in attaining strategic goals and objectives. This course 
addresses concepts, practices, and issues in HRD with a focus on workplace learning organiza- 
tional analysis. 

ADED-711. Social Gerontology Credit 3 (3-0) 

irhis is the study of cultural, sociological and economic factors affecting older adults and their 
amplications for adult education practice. 

ADED-712. Developmental Adult Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course surveys the complex and growing field of developmental adult education and will 
include topics relevant to collegiate remedial education, adult literacy, basic and secondary 
jducation. English as a second language, and working with the learning disabled adult. 



Jncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 22 1 



ADED-713. Literacy in the Black Diaspora Credits 3 (3-0) 

This is an historical overview of literary excellence and achievements evolving with the Afri- 
can adult. This cultural reality provides a contextual frame for the study of literacy initiatives 
within the United States and the Black Diaspora. 

ADED-714. The Community College and Postsecondary Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is a study of the purposes, organization, functions, current trends and historical evolution 
of the comprehensive community college, and its role within adult, community and higher 
education. The North Carolina Community College System is emphasized. 

ADED-715. Women in Adult Education Credits 3 (3-0) 

This course examines the progression of women professionals in the adult education discipline 
within a cultural and socio-political context. The emphasis is placed on initial exclusion^ 
marginalization, and evolving participation, scholarship and leadership. 

ADED-716. Qualitative Research in Adult and Continuing Education Credits 3 (3-0) 
This course presents an overview of qualitative research methods. Learners are introduced tOj 
various qualitative research methods such as historical analysis, case study methods, life histo- 
ries and ethnography. Data collection and analysis techniques are studied and utilized to present 
a research project. 

ADED-759. Computer Applications in Adult Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

Experiences will be provided in various computer and software application for adult and higher 
education. 

ADED-771. Program Development: Community Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a study of community needs assessment, community program design, program 
budgeting, grant writing, planning, and infusion of education that is multicultural into the com- 
munity education curriculum. 

ADED-772. Program Management: Community Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is the study of organization and governance of community education, program 
implementation, direction, supervision and evaluation. 

ADED-773. Leadership Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course introduces the adult learner to leadership theories, styles, ethics, values, principles, 
and perspectives. Case studies and other methods are used to examine leadership situations as 
a means of demonstrating and exercising practical applications of the concepts studied. 

ADED-774. The Changing Environment of Human Resource Development Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course examines the organization as a system influenced by external and internal environ 
mental factors. Selected theories of organizational behavior, organizational culture and 
organizational change will be examined. Learners will develop an in-depth knowledge of the 
dynamic environment in which the human resource development professional operates. Pre 
requisites: ADED 710 Foundations of Human Resource Development or the permission of the 
instructor. 



ADED-775. Learning Interventions for Human Resource Development Credits 3 (3-0) 

Typical programs and learning supports provided in public and private sector workplaces will 
be examined. Human Resource Development interventions that support employee learning 
including needs assessment, implementation and evaluation, will be practiced and analyzed 
Prerequisites: ADED 710 Foundations of Human Resources Development or the permission oi 
the instructor. 



222 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future^ 



UDED-776. Principles of College Teaching Credit 3 (3-0) 

"This course uses an exploratory approach to the framework and mechanics required to teach 
'(successfully at the college level. It addresses skills, methods, course development and syllabus 
'[ design, the evaluation of learning, diversity appreciation, creativity and the integration of tech- 
nology, and trends in distance education. 

'lADED-777. Seminar in Higher Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

^This course is a synthesis of current research in higher education relating to administration, 
curriculum, and faculty development. 

UDED-778. Student Personnel Services Credit 3 (3-0) 

"This course is an analysis of student development programs in post-secondary institutions, in- 
cluding pre-admission; education; vocational and personal counseling; career guidance services; 
attitude and interest assessment; student affairs, rights, and responsibilities and financial aid. 

UDED-779. Technical Education in Community Junior Colleges Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course offers techniques in identifying community needs and in planning curricula and 

'courses for technical/vocational education. 

o 

ADED-785A. Independent Readings in Education I Credit 1 (0-2) 

This course includes individual study and selected readings in consultation with an instructor. 
Prerequisites: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

5 

ADED-786A. Independent Readings in Education II Credit 2 (0-4) 

This course involves individual study and selected readings in consultation with an instructor. 

'Prerequisites: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

(] 

iADED-787A. Independent Readings in Education III Credit 3 (0-6) 

This course involves individual study and selected readings in consultation with an instructor. 
Prerequisites: 24 hours of graduate credit. 

*ADED-790A. Seminar in Education Problems Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course includes intensive study, investigation, or research in selected areas of adult educa- 
tion. Prerequisites: 24 hours graduate credits. 

'Program of Study for the M.S. in School Counseling Credit Hours 

*HDSV602 Human Development 3 

HDSV 610 Counseling Services 3 

IjHDSV 640 Professional Orientation and Ethics in Counseling 3 

HDSV 650 Theories of Counseling 3 

HDSV 706 Organization and Administration of Counseling Programs 3 

' HDSV 712 Counseling School Age Children 3 

HDSV 735 Counseling Methods (Lab) 3 

^HDSV 740 Appraisal 3 

"iHDSV 750 Group Counseling (Lab) 3 

HDSV 760 Career Counseling (Lab) 3 

[HDSV 765 Practicum (Lab) 3 

[HDSV 770 Applied Research in Counseling 3 

£ HDSV780 Internship I 3 

:HDSV 790 Internship II 3 

o Electives 15 

60 Hours 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 223 



Program of Study for the M.S. in Human Resources 



(Communit 


y/Agency) 


Credit Hours 


HDSV 602 


Human Development 


3 


HDSV610 


Counseling Services 


3 


HDSV 640 


Professional Orientation and Ethics in Counseling 


3 


HDSV 650 


Theories of Counseling 


3 


HDSV 710 


Community /Agency Counseling 


3 


HDSV 735 


Counseling Methods (Lab) 


3 


HDSV 736 


Multicultural Counseling 


3 


HDSV 740 


Appraisal 


3 


HDSV 750 


Group Counseling (Lab) 


3 1 


HDSV 760 


Career Counseling (Lab) 


3 ! 


HDSV 763 


Family Counseling (Lab) 


3 


HDSV 765 


Practicum (Lab) 


3 


HDSV 770 


Applied Research in Counseling 


3 1 


HDSV 780 


Internship I 


3 1 


HDSV 790 


Internship II 


3 1 




Electives 


15 i 
60 Hours | 


Program of 


Study for the M.S. in Human Resources 


1 


(Rehabilitation Counseling) 


Credit Hours! 


HDSV 602 


Human Development 


3 


HDSV 612 


Foundations of Rehabilitation Counseling 


3 


HDSV 650 


Theories in Counseling 


3 


HDSV 735 


Counseling Methods (Lab) 


3 


HDSV 736 


Multicultural Counseling 


3 | 


HDSV 738 


Psychological Aspects of Disability 


3 


HDSV 740 


Appraisal 


3 


HDSV 743 


Medical Aspects of Disability 


3 1 


HDSV 750 


Group Counseling (Lab) 


3 


HDSV 760 


Career Counseling (Lab) 


3 1 


HDSV 764 


Case Management 


3 


HDSV 765 


Practicum (Lab) 


3 ! 


HDSV 770 


Applied Research 


3 


HDSV 775 


Job Development and Placement 


3 


HDSV 780 


Internship I 


3 


HDSV 790 


Internship II 


3 
48 Hours [ 


Rehabilitation Administration Concentration 


j 


TECH 67 


Method and Techniques for Workplace Training and 


Development 3 


BUAD 730 


Human Resources Management 


3 


BUAD731 


Staffing 


3 


BUAD 733 


Compensation and Benefits 


3 i 


Course Offerings in Counseling 


Credit 


HDSV 602 


Human Development 


3 (3-0) 


HDSV 610 


Counseling Services 


3 (3-0) 


HDSV 612 


Foundations of Rehabilitation Counseling 


3(3-0) i 


HDSV 630 


Statistics and Research Methodology 


3 (3-0) 


HDSV 640 


Professional Orientation and Ethics in Counseling 


3 (3-0) 



224 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



HDSV 650 
?HDSV 706 

HDSV 711 
HDSV 712 
HDSV 721 
HDSV 735 
HDSV 736 
HDSV 738 
HDSV 739 
HDSV 740 
HDSV 743 
HDSV 750 
HDSV 751 
HDSV 759 
HDSV 760 
HDSV 763 
HDSV 764 
HDSV 765 
HDSV 770 
? HDSV 775 
HDSV 780 
HDSV 790 



Theories of Counseling 

Organization and Administration of School 

Counseling Programs 

Human Resource Counseling 

Counseling School Age Children 

Independent Study 

Counseling Methods (Lab) 

Multicultural Counseling 

Psychological Aspects of Disability 

Community /Agency Counseling 

Appraisal 

Medical Aspects of Disability 

Group Counseling (Lab) 

Special Topics in Counselin 

Substance Abuse Counseling 

Career Counseling (Lab) 

Family Counseling (Lab) 

Case Management 

Practicum (Lab) 

Applied Research in Counseling 

Job Development and Placement 

Internship I 

Internship II 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN COUNSELING 



3 (3-0) 



3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(1-3) 


3 


(2-2) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(0-6) 


3 


(0-6) 



HDSV-602. Human Development Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is an examination of human psychological development through the life span. 

HDSV-610. Counseling Services Credit 3 (3-0) 

Those aspects of counseling as they apply to school, community, and business settings will be 
covered in this course. 

HDSV-612. Foundations of Rehabilitation Counseling Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will explore the history and philosophy of rehabilitation, legislation affecting indi- 
viduals with disabilities, organizational structure of the rehabilitation systems, and the 
rehabilitation counseling practice. 

HDSV-640. Professional Orientation and Ethics in Counseling Credit 3 (3-0) 

Ethics, standards, and credentialing for professional counselors are presented in this course. 

HDSV-650. Theories of Counseling Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is an introduction to the primary theories and techniques in the field of counseling 
and their underlying components. Prerequisites: HDSV 602, 610, 612 

HDSV-706. Organization and Administration of School 

Counseling Programs Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a study of the organization and implementation of guidance services in schools. 
Prerequisite: HDSV 610, 640 

HDSV-711. Overview of Human Resources Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides an overview of various aspects of Human Resources management. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



225 



HDS V-712. Counseling School Age Children Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course examines how counselors can be effective in addressing the developmental, men- 
tal, and psychological needs of elementary, middle, and high school students. Prerequisite: 
HDSV 650. 

HDSV-721. Independent Study Credit 3 (3-0) 

With the supervision of an approving professor, a student may carry out a special project of 
particular interest, and with appropriate relationship to his counseling specialization. Students 
must apply for and obtain approval of the supervising professor and the department chairper- 
son one semester before registering for this course. The work of the course must be submitted 
in the form of a written report. 

HDSV-735. Counseling Methods Credit 3 (3-0) 

The fundamentals of general counseling skills will be addressed as a foundation for further 
study. This course includes laboratory experiences for the observation and application of coun- 
seling skills. Prerequisite: HDSV 650. 

HDSV-736. Multicultural Counseling Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides an overview of issues and trends for counselors in a diverse society. 
Prerequisites: HDSV 650 

HDSV-738. Psychosocial Aspects of Disability Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course explores the social and psychological adjustments of disability, and examines atti- 
tudes, feelings, and responses toward persons with disabilities. Prerequisite: HDSV 610 or 
HDSV 612 

HDSV-739. Community/ Agency Counseling Credit 3 (3-0) 

Counseling delivery systems and procedures found in community/agency settings will be ex- 
amined in this course. Prerequisite: HDSV 640. 

HDSV-740. Appraisal Credit 3 (3-0) 

The student will be introduced to evaluation and assessment tools, including relevant statistics 
and computer applications. Prerequisite: HDSV 612, 640 

HDSV-741. Assessment Credit 3 (3-0) 

The medical and psychosocial aspects of disabilities, evaluation approaches, techniques inter- 
pretation, available resources, and vocational assessment will be addressed in this course/ 
Prerequisite: HDSV 630 

HDSV-743. Medical Aspects of Disability Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is an orientation to the characteristics of a range of medical impairments and their 
vocational implications. It explores medical terminology, common diagnostic procedures, and 
the role of health professionals. Prerequisite: HDSV 610 or HDSV 612 

HDSV-750. Group Counseling Credit 3 (3-0) 

Theories, techniques, and procedures appropriate for counseling groups will be included, as 
well as topics to build understanding of group development and dynamics. This course in- 
cludes laboratory experiences for observation and application of group counseling skills. 
Prerequisite: HDSV 735. 

HDSV-751. Special Topics in Counseling Credit 3 (3-0) 

Topics in various areas of counseling will be selected and announced by the professor. Prereq- 
uisite: HDSV 735. 



226 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 






HDSV-759. Substance Abuse Counseling Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will examine the impact of chemical dependency and abuse on the development of 
'individuals, the functioning of families and the productivity of the workforce. Comprehensive 
\ ways of conceptualizing and treating substance abuse will be discussed . Prerequisites : HDS V 650 . 

HDSV-760. Career Counseling Credit 3 (3-0) 

I This course includes career development theories, applied and related counseling procedures 
and technological applications. This course includes laboratory experiences for observation of 
and practice in career counseling. Prerequisite: HDSV 735. 

HDSV-763. Family Counseling Credit 3 (3-0) 

[This course will introduce major theories of family counseling, including family systems therapy. 
-Experiential, structural, and functional techniques of family counseling and assessment will be 
i addressed. Prerequisite: HDSV 735. 

HDSV-764. Case Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

Case management process (including case finding, service coordination, referral to and utiliza- 
tion of the other disciplines and client advocacy), planning for the provision of independent 
living services, vocational rehabilitation services, computer applications, and technology for 
caseload management will be covered in this course. Prerequisite: HDSV 612. 

HDSV-765. Practicum Credit 3 (1-4) 

. This is a laboratory course in which studies will engage in supervised practice in the use of 
'counseling skills. Prerequisites: HDSV 640, 750 or 743 and 750. 

HDSV-770. Applied Research Credit 3 (2-2) 

I A research report of a technical nature must be produced using skills acquired in HDSV 630. 
(The written report will be under the supervision of the instructor. A technical oral presentation 
'will be required. Prerequisite: HDSV 740. 

HDSV-775. Job Development and Placement Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will explore strategies for job development, and placement for individuals with 
I disabilities. Prerequisite: HDSV 612. 

HDSV-780. Internship I Credit 3 (0-6) 

iThis course requires three hundred (300) clock hours of supervised internship in an appropriate 
field placement. Students must apply to take this course one semester before enrollment. Class 

! meetings will be scheduled and announced by the professor. Individual conferences will be 
required. Prerequisites: HDSV 765 and all professional core courses as specified by track. 

iHDSV-790. Internship II Credit 3 (0-6) 

1 Three hundred (300) clock hours of advanced supervised practice in an appropriate counseling 
setting is required. Students must apply to take this course one semester before placement. 
Class meetings will be scheduled and announced by the professor. Individual conferences will 

?be required. Prerequisites: HDSV 765, 780 and all professional core courses as specified by 

,i track. 

' * Exceptions: Prior professional courses except HDSV 759, 763, and 770 

All major courses must be taken in the counseling program here at NORTH CAROLINA A&T 
STATE UNIVERSITY. 

All "provisionally admitted" students must be reviewed after 9 hours of course work and no 
additional courses will be given until an "unconditional" application has been submitted by 
the student, reviewed and accepted by the counseling faculty. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 227 



Master of School Administration Degree Program 

Principal Licensure 
42 Credit Hours Required 

Required Courses 

Course Description Credit 

MSA 770 Research and Inquiry 3 (3-0) 

MSA 77 1 Diversity Issues in Administration 3 (3-0) 

MSA 772 Administration, Management and Supervision 3 (3-0) 

MSA 773 Issues in Educational Administration 3 (3-0) 

MSA 774 Curriculum and Instructional Leadership 3 (3-0) 

MSA 775 Advanced Technology for Administrators 3 (3-0) 

MSA 776 Law, Policy and Politics 3 (3-0) 

MSA 777 Ethical and Societal Aspects of Leadership 3 (3-0) 

MSA 778 ThePrincipalship 3(3-0) 

MSA 779 Strategic Planning and Problem Solving 3 (3-0) 

MSA 780 Internship Seminar I 3 (3-0) 

MSA 781 Internship Practicum I 3 (3-0) 

MSA 782 Internship Seminar II 3 (3-0) 

MSA 783 Internship Practicum II 3 (3-0) 

Comprehensive Exam: Successful completion of the comprehensive exam will be re- 
quired prior to enrollment in the internship and should be taken the final semester of formal 
course work. The exam will consist of both written and oral presentations to the faculty. Stu- 
dents will be presented with a case study and are expected to integrate and apply concepts and 
information from core courses and clinical experiences. 

Internship Seminar and Practicum 

Seminar topics may include: 

• Legal Issues 

• Special Education 

• Personnel Management 

• Due process in student and staff relationships 

• Strategies for building parent and community relationships 

• Data collection and analysis 

• Creating Safe and secure school environments 

• Professional development for staff 

• Selecting and managing instructional technology 

Leadership Portfolio 

Each candidate must develop a leadership portfolio that provides evidence of competence 
in each National, State, and Institutional Standard. The portfolio will document evidence of an 
intern's reflection on individual growth with respect to knowledge, skills, and professional 
perspectives in each standard. 

State Licensure Examination 

The School Leaders Licensure Assessment is required for the State of North Carolina. It 
must be taken and passed during the internship year prior to graduation. 



228 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Course Descriptions in School Administration 

Students are enrolled in cohort groups and move thru the sequence of courses together. 

MSA 770. Research and Inquiry Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will examine the quantitative and qualitative research methodologies appropriate 
to school settings and the evaluation of research, data analysis, and its application to schools. 
(Fall, Spring, and Summer) 

MSA 771. Diversity Issues in Administration Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will focus on skills leaders need to successfully deliver programs for diverse stu- 
dent populations. Diverse learning in a pluralistic society and content appropriate strategies 
will be addressed. (Fall, Spring, and Summer) 

MSA 772. Administration, Management, and Supervision Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course in administration of K-12 schools will focus on (1) formal and informal organiza- 
tional structures, concepts, and practices, (2) the management process, (3) administrative and 
supervisory functions with particular reference to personnel, and (4) program and fiscal man- 
agement. (Fall, Spring, and Summer) 

MSA 773. Issues in Educational Administration Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will focus on current education issues and administrative organization of schools, 
federal-state-local contexts, accountability issues, school finance, role of technology as both 
an instructional and administrative tool, building consensus, communicating effectively, and 
Ideveloping collaborative skills will be included. (Fall, Spring, and Summer) 

MSA 774. Curriculum and Instructional Leadership Credit 3 (3-0) 

fThis course will focus on the application of current effective theories of learning and research 
ion classroom instruction. Curriculum planning based on state and national standards, diversity 
•issues, and use of instructional technology and assessment strategies will be addressed. Lead- 
ership styles and models to improve curriculum and instruction through classroom observation 
and assessment of teacher delivery will be included. (Fall, Spring, and Summer) 
i 

MSA 775. Technology for School Administrators Credit 3 (3-0) 

The use of technology for curriculum management, student management, fiscal management, 
Idecision-making, and other administrative applications will be covered in this course. (Fall, 
sSpring, and Summer) 

MSA 776. Law, Policy, and Politics of Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will cover the influence of the laws, educational policies, and power structures of 
communities on the goals and operations of schools. State statutes, administrative policies and 
(regulations, court decisions regarding public school personnel, and appropriate application of 
degal principles will be discussed. (Fall, Spring, and Summer) 

MSA 777. Ethical and Societal Aspects of Educational Leadership Credit 3 (3-0) 

(This course will provide an examination of the social, cultural, political, economical, and philo- 
sophical contexts from which the current issues that affect schools and schooling have evolved. 
['(Fall, Spring, and Summer) 

MSA 778. The Principalship Credit 3 (3-0) 

'This principalship course will examine different management perspectives of school opera- 
tions, organizations, and team leadership. The relationship of schools to other community 

1 agencies, supervision, instructional leadership, personnel administration, and communication 
will be discussed. (Fall, Spring, and Summer) 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 229 



MSA 779. Strategic Planning and Problem Solving Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will focus on components of strategic planning and problems solving including 
research and best practices. Problem-solving processes will emphasize retrieving, assessing, 
evaluating, and synthesizing research as applied to educational programs. (Fall, Spring, and 
Summer) 

MSA 780. Internship Seminar I Credit 3 (1-2) 

The internship seminar is conducted once a week during the full-time internship. This seminar 
complements field activities and provides interns the opportunity to share experiences, de- 
velop concepts, and broaden their knowledge of school administration. Students will develop 
case studies, and portfolios to demonstrate acquisition of skills. Co-requisite: MSA 781 Intern- 
ship Practicum I. (Fall, Spring, and Summer) 

MSA 781. Internship Practicum I Credit 3 (0-6) 

Each student will complete a semester internship in a public educational setting with joint 
supervision by a university faculty member and a cooperating mentor for each individual in- 
tern. The internship is the culminating experiences in the preparation of school administrators. 
Co-requisite: MSA 780 Internship Seminar I. (Fall, Spring, and Summer) 

MSA 782. Internship Seminar II Credit 3 (1-2) 

The internship seminar is conducted once a week during the full-time internship. This seminar 
complements field activities and provides interns the opportunity to share experiences, de- 
velop concepts, and broaden their knowledge of school administration. Students will develop 
case studies, and portfolios to demonstrate acquisition of skills. Co-requisite: MSA 783 Intern- 
ship Practicum I. (Fall, Spring, and Summer) 

MSA 783. Internship Practicum II Credit 3 (0-6) 

Each student will complete a semester internship in a public educational setting with joint 
supervision by a university faculty member and a cooperating mentor for each individual in- 
tern. The internship is the culminating experiences in the preparation of school administrators. 
Co-requisite: MSA 782 Internship Seminar I. (Fall, Spring, and Summer) 



230 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Human Environment and Family Sciences 



http://www.ag.ncat.edu/academics/hefs/index.html 

Gladys G. Shelton, Chairperson 

102 Benbow Hall 

(336) 334-7850 

OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the graduate program in Food and Nutritional Sciences are: 

1. To develop the basic knowledge and skills necessary to undertake research in the 
Food and Nutritional Sciences and other related areas. 

2. To develop competencies to work as food and nutrition specialists in education, or 
with other community nutrition agencies and food industries. 

3. To obtain theoretical and experimental competencies necessary to pursue additional 
graduate studies or obtain professional degrees. 

DEGREE OFFERED 

Master of Science - Food and Nutritional Sciences 



GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 



For admission, students in the graduate program in Food and Nutritional Sciences must 
I have an earned baccalaureate degree in Food and Nutrition from an accredited undergraduate 
i institution and have an overall grade point average of 2.6. Non-food and nutrition majors (i.e., 
(Chemistry, Biochemistry, Biology, Animal and Plant Sciences, Physiology, or other related 
; science disciplines) are encouraged to apply but students are required to clear the course defi- 
| ciencies after enrollment. A minimum of six (6) hours or more of Food and Nutritional Sci- 
ences courses are required to address these deficiencies. The Test of English as a Foreign 
I Language (TOEFL) is required for foreign students. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 
i is not required for admission into the program at this time. 

The Masters program in Food and Nutritional Sciences offer students two (2) options: 

i thesis and non-thesis. The thesis option requires that each student submit a thesis based on 

i research related to Nutrition or Food Science. The non-thesis option requires students to take in 

I addition to the curriculum a minimum of six (6) extra credit hours. These credit hours must be 

at the graduate level. 

OTHER REQUIREMENTS 

All applicants are required to take a Qualifying Examination in Food and Nutritional Sci- 
i ences or take two basic Food and Nutritional Sciences courses. The test must be taken prefer- 
ably prior to the registration for graduate courses or by the end of the first semester of the 
graduate work. The student may take one basic Food Science course and one Nutrition course 
each, and make a grade of B or better. Admission to candidacy for the M.S. in Food and Nutri- 
tional Sciences requires the satisfactory completion of the Qualifying Examination, a mini- 
mum overall average of 3.0 in at least nine (9) semester hours of graduate work at NCA&TSU, 
and removal of all deficiencies in undergraduate preparation. 

A final Comprehensive Examination in Food and Nutritional Sciences can be taken only if 
a student has completed all course work and maintained a 3 .0 grade point average in graduate 
courses at the 600 level or above. At least fifty percent of the courses counted in the work 
towards the Master's degree must be designated for graduate students only. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 23 1 



The student must complete the Departmental Qualifying Examination, the Comprehen- 
sive Examination, satisfactory presentation and defense of the thesis (thesis option) and sub- 
mission to the graduate office or completion of practicum (non-thesis) in order to be approved 
for graduation. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

A degree in this area prepares students to enter careers in such areas as research, quality 
control and management for food industries, local, state and federal agencies. Other career 
options may include college and junior college teaching, community nutrition, dietetics and 
extension service. 

A. Thesis Option - Suggested Curriculum Guide 
Requirements: 

1 . Twelve-Thirteen (12-13) semester hours of Food and Nutrition courses. 

HEFS 730 - Nutrition and Disease 3 credits 

Experimental Foods (4 credits) OR 

Food Chemistry (3 credits) 3-4 credits 

Research Methods Food and Nutrition 4 credits 

Seminar in Food and Nutrition 2 credits 

Comprehensive Examination credit 

In addition to the above core courses three (3) hours of 3 credits 

statistics numbered 600 or above are required. 

Six (6) semester hours in Food and Nutrition and related 6 credits 

areas are required. 

Three (3) semester hours of advanced Biochemistry or 3 credits 

equivalent numbered 600 or above. 

Three (3) semester hours of suggested electives 3 credits 

HEFS 739 - Thesis Research 3 credits 

30-31 credit hours 



HEFS 735 
HEFS 631 
HEFS 736 
HEFS 744 
HEFS 788 
2. 



4. 



B. Non-Thesis Option 
Requirements: 



Suggested Curriculum Guide 



1 . Twelve-Thirteen (12-13) semester hours of Food and Nutrition courses . 
HEFS 730 - Nutrition and Disease 

HEFS 735 - Experimental Foods (4 credits) OR 
HEFS 631 - Food Chemistry (3 credits) 
HEFS 736 - Research Methods Food and Nutrition 
HEFS 744 - Seminar in Food and Nutrition 
HEFS 745 - Practicum in Food and Nutrition 
HEFS 788 - Comprehensive Examination 

2. In addition to the above core courses three (3) hours of 
statistics numbered 600 or above are required. 

3. Twelve (12) semester hours in Food and Nutrition and 
related areas are required. 

4. Three (3) semester hours of advanced Biochemistry 
numbered 600 or above or equivalent. 

5. Three (3) semester hours of suggested electives. 

36-37 



3 credits 

3-4 credits 

4 credits 

2 credits 

3 credits 
credit 

3 credits 

12 credits 

3 credits 

3 credits 
credit hours 



232 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



COURSES - FOOD AND NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES AND RELATED AREAS 

i HEFS 601 Quantity Food 

I HEFS 630 Advanced Nutrition 

1 HEFS 63 1 Food Chemistry 

HEFS 632 Maternal and Developmental Nutrition 

HEFS 635 Introduction to Research Methods in Food and Nutrition 

HEFS 636 Food Promotion 

HEFS 637 Special Problem in Food, Nutrition or Food Science 

HEFS 638 Sensory Evaluation 

HEFS 640 Geriatric Nutrition 

HEFS 641 Current Trends in Food Service 

HEFS 643 Food Preservation 

HEFS 648 Community Nutrition 

HEFS 650 International Nutrition 

HEFS 651 Food Safety and Sanitation 

HEFS 652 Diet Therapy 

HEFS 653 Food Biotechnology 

HEFS 679 Nutrition Education 

HEFS 715 Trace Elements and Nutrition 

HEFS 730 Nutrition and Disease 

HEFS 733 Nutrition during Growth and Development 

HEFS 734 Nutrition Education 

HEFS 735 Experimental Foods 

HEFS 736 Research Methods in Food and Nutrition 

HEFS 739 Thesis Research 

HEFS 740 Community Nutrition 

HEFS 742 Food Culture: Nutrition Anthropology 

HEFS 744 Seminar in Food and Nutrition 

HEFS 745 Practicum in Food and Nutrition 

Suggested Elective Courses 

HEFS 606 Cooperative Extension 

HEFS 607 Cooperative Extension Field Experience 

HEFS 608 Teaching Adults and Youth in Out-of-School Settings 

ANSC 615 Selection of Meat and Meat Products 

ANSC 617 Physiology of Reproduction of Farm Animals 

BIOL 630 Molecular Genetics 

CHEM651 General Biochemistry 

COMP 600 Special Topics in Computer Science 

CUIN617 Computer in Education 

SOCI 617 Research Methods II 

CUIN 776 Independent Reading in Education II 

CUIN 777 Independent Reading in Education III 

CUIN 790 Seminar in Education Problem 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



233 



COURSES WITH DESCRIPTION IN HUMAN ENVIRONMENT 
AND FAMILY SCIENCES 

Food and Nutritional Sciences 
Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Courses 

HEFS-601. Quantity Foods Credit 4 (1-6) 

The application of principles of cookery to the preparation and service of food for group feeding 
with emphasis on menu planning, work schedules, cost and portion control, distribution and 
service are implemented in a laboratory setting. Prerequisites: HEFS-130, 246, 344, AGEC-446. 

HEFS-630. Advanced Nutrition Credit 3 (3-0) 

Intermediate metabolism and interrelationships of organic and inorganic food nutrients in hu- 
man biochemical functions. Prerequisites: HEFS-337 and CHEM-251, 252 or equivalent. 

HEFS-631. Food Chemistry Credit 3 (2-2) 

A study of the chemical, biochemical and physical properties of components of basic raw foods 
and behavior of the components including non-microbial changes during processing and stor- 
age. Prerequisites: HEFS-236, CHEM-106, 107 and 251 . 

HEFS-632. Maternal and Lifespan Nutrition Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course emphasizes the energy and nutrient requirements and feeding practices for stages 
of the life span. The influence of nutrition on growth and development is discussed. The nutri- 
tional quality of food, physiological development, growth assessment, dietary evaluation and 
nutrition assessments for various stages of the lifespan are covered. Prerequisites: HEFS-332, 
337 or instructor's permission. 

HEFS-633. Food Analysis Credit 3 (1-4) 

Fundamental chemical, physical and sensory aspects of food composition as they relate to 
physical properties, acceptability and nutritional values of foods. Prerequisites: CHEM-102, 
112, HEFS-236. 

HEFS-635. Introduction to Research Methods in Food and Nutrition Credit 3 (0-6) 

Laboratory experiences in the use of methods applicable to food and nutrition research. Prereq- 
uisite: Consent of the instructor. 

HEFS-636. Food Promotion Credit 4 (1-6) 

A course which provides experiences in the development and testing of recipes. Opportunities 
will be provided for demonstrations, writing and photography with selected business. 

HEFS-637. Special Problems in Food and Nutrition Credit 3 (0-6) 

Independent study and/or experiences in food and/or nutrition. Prerequisite: Admission by in- 
structor. 

HEFS-638. Sensory Evaluation Credit 3 (2-2) 

A study of the color, flavor, aroma and texture of foods by the use of sensory evaluation meth- 
ods. Prerequisites: HEFS-236, HEFS-337. 

HEFS-640. Geriatric Nutrition Credit 3 (3-0) 

Multidisciplinary approaches to geriatric foods, nutrition and health problems. Evaluation of 
nutritional status and nutrition care of the elderly is emphasized. Field experience: nursing 
home and other community agencies. Prerequisite: HEFS-337 or 439. 



234 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



I HEFS-641 . Current Trends in Food Science Credit 3 (3-0) 

Recent developments in food science and their implications for food scientists, nutritionists, 
dietitians and other professionals in the food industry and related professions. 

[HEFS-643. Food Preservation Credit 3 (2-2) 

A study of current methods of preserving foods - canning, freezing, dehydration, radiation, and 
fermentation. Prerequisite: HEFS-236 or equivalent. 

HEFS-645. Special Problems in Food Administration Credit 2 (0-4) 

! Individual work on special problems in food administration. 

I HEFS-648. Community Nutrition Credit 3 (3-0) 

) This course provides an introduction and review of major communication and education skills 
I that dietitians and nutritionists use in techniques of interviewing and counseling in community 
i nutrition programs, and materials, methods and goals in planning, assessing, organizing and 
i marketing nutrition for health promotion and preventing diseases. Evaluation of food and nu- 
trition programs at State and Federal level are included. Prerequisite: HEFS-679. 

I HEFS-650. International Nutrition Credit 3 (3-0) 

, An ecological approach to the study of hunger and malnutrition in technologically developed 
and developing countries. Focus is on integrated intervention programs, projects, and prob- 
lems. Opportunities to participate in national and international internships through cooperative 
arrangements are provided. 

IHEFS-651. Food Safety and Sanitation Credit 3 (3-0) 

'. This course covers practices and procedures for hygienic food handling, processing, sanitation, 

I food safety laws, and implementation of Hazard Analysis Critical Control point (HACCP) 

! system in food processing and food service operations. Emphasis is placed on sanitation man- 

! agement, hazards, standards, and corrective actions for food service operations that are critical 

control points for food safety. Practical measures for prevention of food borne diseases and the 

effects of microorganisms, toxins, foreign objectives and physical damage on the safety and 

quality of foods are discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL-220. 

HEFS-652. Diet Therapy Credit 4 (3-2) 

This course is a study of the principles of nutritional sciences in the treatment and management 
of nutrition related diseases. Course content includes etiology, prevalence, pathophysiology, 
biochemical, clinical and nutritional needs and diet modification in the treatment of diseases. 
Prerequisites: HEFS-130, 337, 630. 

HEFS-653. Food Biotechnology Credit 3 (1-4) 

This course covers the impact of biotechnology on food production. It covers classical to mod- 
ern day food biotechnology and beyond. Modern day genetic tools, as applied to food 
biotechnology, will be examined. A major focus will be on the improvement of microbes used 
in food production by modern biotechnological approaches. Prerequisites: BIOL 220. 

HEFS-679. Nutrition Education Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers the philosophy, principles, methods and materials involved in nutrition 
education. Application of nutrition knowledge and skills in the development of the nutrition 
education curriculum and programs in schools and communities is implemented. Prerequisites: 
332, 337; students must be advanced undergraduate or graduate level. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 235 



GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 

HEFS-715. Trace Elements and Nutrition Credit 3 (3-0) 

Physiological functions and requirements of trace minerals as well as the roles of trace miner- 
als in health and disease will be discussed. Prerequisite: HEFS 337. 

HEFS-730. Nutrition and Disease Credit 3 (3-1) 

Significance of nutrition in health and disease. Consideration of: (1) the methods of appraisal 
of human nutritional status to include clinical, dietary, biochemical, and anthropometric tech- 
niques; (2) various biochemical parameters used to diagnose and treat disorders; and (3) the 
role of diet as a therapeutic tool. Prerequisite: HEFS -630 or equivalent. 

HEFS-733. Nutrition During Growth and Development Credit 3 (2-2) 

Nutritional, genetical and environmental influences on human growth and development. Pre- 
requisite: HEFS-630 or equivalent. 

HEFS-734. Nutrition Education Credit 3 (2-2) 

Interpretation of the results of nutrition research for use with lay groups. Preparation of teach- 
ing materials based on research for use in nutrition education programs. Prerequisite: HEFS 

337. 

HEFS-735. Experimental Foods Credit 3 (2-2) 

Objective and subjective evaluation of food, development and testing of recipes, and experi- 
mentation with food. Prerequisite: HEFS-236 or equivalent. 

HEFS-736. Research Methods in Food and Nutrition Credit 4 (2-6) 

Experimental procedures in food and nutrition research care of experimental animals, analysis 
of food, body fluids, and animal tissues. Prerequisite: MATH 224 or equivalent. 

HEFS-739. Thesis Research Credit 3 (0-6) 

Research problems in food or nutrition. 

HEFS-740. Community Nutrition Credit 3 (3-0) 

Individualized work , team teaching or guest speakers . Application of the principles of nutrition 
to various community nutrition problems of specific groups (geriatrics, preschoolers, adoles- 
cents and expectant mothers). Evaluation of nutrition programs of public health and social 
welfare agencies at local, state, federal and international levels. Prerequisite: HEFS 337. 

HEFS-742. Cultural and Social Aspects of Food and Nutrition Credit 3 (3-0) 

Sociological, psychological, and economical background of ethnic groups and their influence 
on food consumption patterns, and nutritional status. Prerequisite: HEFS 337. 

HEFS-744. Seminar in Food and Nutrition Credit 2 (2-0) 

Required of all graduates in Food and Nutrition. 

HEFS-745. Practicum in Food or Nutrition Credit 3 (0-6) 

Field experiences with private or public agencies. Prerequisite: Students must have completed 
at least 12 credit hours. 

HEFS-788 Comprehensive Examination Credit 

Student must sign up for this course in the semester that they will take the Comprehensive 
Examination. 



236 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Human Resources Management 



Edna J. Ragins, Chairperson 

Room 325 Merrick Hall 

(336) 334-7656 

OBJECTIVE 

The Department of Business Administration offers a program of study leading to the Mas- 
I ter of Science in Management degree with a major concentration in Human Resources Man- 
agement (HRM). The program prepares students and professionals for careers in public and 
private sector positions in the Human Resources Management function of organizations and 
managers interested in understanding how to effectively develop and manage human resources. 

DEGREE OFFERED 

Master of Science in Management - Human Resources Management 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The general requirements for admission are an undergraduate degree from an accredited 
institution with a minimum grade point average of 2.6 (on a 4.0 scale), and a satisfactory 
GMAT score. Applicants who do not meet the requirements will be considered on an individual 
basis. A GPA of 3.0 is required for graduation. 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

Students with a variety of undergraduate majors are encouraged to apply. The program is 
designed to appeal to those who either currently work in industry or desire to affiliate with firms 
or organizations using cutting-edge tools to deliver their products or services. Students in the 
program will have a business undergraduate degree and wish to study a particular area in greater 
depth, or have a non-business degree with the personal or professional interests or experiences 
that would be enhanced by a quality graduate program in management education. 

The program requires a minimum of 36 semester hours. There is no thesis requirement. 
Students without an undergraduate business degree will be required to take appropriate foun- 
dation courses, which may extend the requirements to 48 semester hours. The program consists 
of 21 hours of core courses, including one 3-hour elective, and 15 hours of coursework in the 
major concentration. 

The student pursuing the Master of Science in Management with a major concentration in 
HRM is required to complete a common core of courses consisting of: 



ACCT 714 Managerial Accounting & Finance 

BUAD 713 Business Applications Development 

BUAD 715 Quantitative Business Analysis 

BUAD 716 Strategic Marketing 

BUAD 718 Management & Organization Analysis 

ECON 608 Managerial Economics 

ELECTIVE One course selected from the following: 

BUAD 735 Contemporary Issues in Human Resources 

Management 

BUAD 736 Human Resources Management Strategy 



3 semester hours 
3 semester hours 
3 semester hours 
3 semester hours 
3 semester hours 
3 semester hours 



3 semester hours 
3 semester hours 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



237 



Courses in the HRM concentration will consist of the following: 

BUAD 730 Human Resources Management 3 semester hours 

BUAD 73 1 Staffing 3 semester hours 

BUAD 732 Training and Development 3 semester hours 

BUAD 733 Compensation and Benefits 3 semester hours 

BUAD 734 Employee Relations 3 semester hours 

Students without an undergraduate business degree will be required to 

take appropriate foundation courses, which consist of the following. 

ACCT 708 Seminar in Financial Concepts 3 semester hours 

BUAD 705 Seminar in Business Analysis 3 semester hours 

BUAD 712 Foundations of Enterprise Management 3 semester hours 

ECON 706 Seminar in Economics 3 semester hours 



LIST OF GRADUATE COURSES 

Course Description 

ACCT 708 Seminar in Financial Concepts 

ACCT 714 Managerial Accounting & Finance 

BUAD 705 Seminar in Business Analysis 

BUAD 7 1 2 Foundations of Enterprise Management 

BUAD 713 Business Applications Development 

BUAD 715 Quantitative Business Analysis 

BUAD 716 Strategic Marketing 

BUAD 7 1 8 Management & Organization Analysis 

BUAD 730 Human Resources management 

BUAD 731 Staffing 

BUAD 732 Training and Development 

BUAD 733 Compensation and Benefits 

BUAD 734 Employee Relations 

BUAD 735 Contemporary Issues in Human Resources Management 

BUAD 736 Human Resources Management Strategy 

ECON 608 Managerial Economics 

ECON 706 Seminar in Economics 



Credit 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



COURSES WITH DESCRIPTION IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

BUAD-705. Seminar in Business Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will integrate the statistical and mathematical concepts that are essential for iden- 
tifying, analyzing, and solving complex business problems. Business applications will involve 
investment, inventory, and capital budgeting analyses, utilizing computer spreadsheet models 
and the Visual Basic programming language. 

BUAD-712. Foundations of Enterprise Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides an understanding of key themes related to successful enterprise manage- 
ment, and discussions of the interpersonal and intellectual skills necessary to contribute to a 
highly competitive and globalized business environment. Topics include the globalization of 
commerce, marketing and market systems, competitive strategy, perspectives on legal and ethical 
business conduct, information technology, and the elements of quality. Individual and team 
competencies are developed using materials that involve interpersonal skills, problem-solving, 
and case analysis. 



238 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



I BUAD 713. Business Applications Development Credit 3 (3-0) 

f This course focuses on application development and tools for business solutions. Concepts 
: associated with the design, creation, and implementation of computer programs are studied. 
j Application algorithms are designed using supportive software tools such as flowcharts, 
j pseudocode, and hierarchy charts. Emphasis is placed on the development of applications us- 
: ing systems methods, top-down design, testing, debugging, modularity, and structured techniques 
! to be implemented and maintained in a variety of business environments. This course uses an 
i object-oriented programming language. 

BUAD-715. Quantitative Business Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

[This course familiarizes students with basic quantitative techniques for decision-making in all 
'business functions. Specific topics will include data collection and presentation; basic descrip- 
tive statistics and probability; discrete and continuous probability distributions; confidence 
intervals; hypothesis testing; business forecasting; linear and multiple regression models; lin- 
ear, integer, and nonlinear programming; and computer simulation. Emphasis will be on the 
application of these techniques for managerial decision-making. Prerequisite: ACCT 708, BUAD 
1705, BUAD 712 and ECON 706. 

BUAD-716. Strategic Marketing Credit 3 (3-0) 

!This course provides in-depth examination of the role of marketing in strategic planning and 
decision-making. Students develop skills critical to directing business-unit marketing strategy 
and designing or reengineering a customer-driven organization. The course content empha- 
sizes cases and readings. It also exposes students to emerging issues in marketing strategy 
including relationship marketing and e-commerce. Prerequisite: ACCT 708, BUAD 705, BUAD 
7712 and ECON 706. 

fBUAD-718. Management and Organizational Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

IThis course is a study of formal organizations as rational, organic, open systems and their 
behavior in response to an ever-changing, global and domestic environment. It covers macro 
and micro theories of management and organizations and their application to organizational 
design and processes. Organizational effectiveness, strategic planning and control, structural 
designs, leadership, motivation, globalization, and corporate politics and culture are studied 
through extensive reading, case studies, exploratory research and seminar discussions. Prereq- 
uisite: ACCT 708, BUAD 705, BUAD 712 and ECON 706. 

IBUAD-730. Human Resources Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides an overview of the design, administration and evaluation of the human 
r resources function. It looks at conceptual issues, policies and practices used by organizations 
! to attract, develop and retain human resources; and the role of human resources management in 
i organizational effectiveness. Topics include an introduction to the activities of the human re- 
S source function: staffing, training and development, performance appraisal, compensation and 
(benefits, employee relations, and legal environment of human resources management, and spe- 
(cial issues and challenges in international human resources management. Theories relating to 
(human motivation and behavior are discussed. Prerequisites: ACCT 708, BUAD 705, BUAD 
:712 and ECON 706. 

1BUAD-731. Staffing Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course looks at theory and application methods used in the recruitment and selection of 
employees. Course topics include job analysis, interviewing and testing methods, selection 
techniques, legal issues in recruitment and selection, internal and external selection processes 
including performance appraisal and management, staffing philosophies for international op- 
erations, and expatriate repatriation. Prerequisite: BUAD 730. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 239 



BUAD-732. Training and Development Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course explores the theory and practice used for training and developing human resources 
in organizations. Course content includes identifying training needs, designing and implementing 
training programs to satisfy individual and organizational goals, and evaluating training pro- 
gram effectiveness. Workforce diversity, theories of organizational and individual learning, 
career development, change theory and training for international operations are also discussed. 
Prerequisite: BUAD 730. 

BUAD-733. Compensation and Benefits Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course examines theory and practice in designing and managing compensation and ben- 
efit systems in organizations. Issues considered include compensation and benefit systems as 
vehicles for attracting, motivating, and retaining employees; designing individual and group 
incentive plans; structuring pension plans; determining wage levels and structures; legal issues 
and considerations in compensation and benefit administration; and expatriate compensation. 
Prerequisite: BUAD 730. 

BUAD-734. Employee Relations Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course examines the policies and practices used to promote equitable treatment of em- 
ployees. Topics include employee health and safety, employee communication, equal opportunity 
and affirmative action, workforce diversity, employee rights, conflict resolution, industrial re- 
lations, and international labor relations. Also includes legal aspects of employee relations. 
Prerequisite: BUAD 730. 

BUAD-735. Contemporary Issues in Human Resources Management Credit 3 (3-0) 
This course considers important issues affecting the acquisition and utilization of human re- 
sources in a dynamic global environment. Topics vary and depend on the current HRM 
environment. Prerequisites: ACCT 708, BUAD 705, BUAD 712 and ECON 706. 

BUAD-736. Human Resources Management Strategy Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on the formulation and implementation of human resources management 
strategies. Emphasis is placed on the strategic dimensions of recruitment, selection, develop- 
ment and retention of a workforce needed to accomplish organizational strategic objectives. 
Prerequisites: ACCT 708, BUAD 705, BUAD 712 and ECON 706. 



240 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Industrial and Systems Engineering 



Eui H. Park, Chairperson 

419 McNair Building 

(336) 334-7780 

OBJECTIVE 

The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy Programs in Industrial and Systems 
Engineering are designed to meet the need for technical and/or managerial specialists in Indus- 
trial and Systems Engineering. Four areas of concentration (Human-Machine Systems Engi- 
neering (HMSE), Management Systems Engineering (MSE), Production Systems Engineering 
(PSE), and Operations Research and Systems Analysis (ORSA) are being offered. 

DEGREE OFFERED 

Master of Science - Industrial Engineering 
Ph.D. - Industrial Engineering 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The program is open to students with a bachelor's degree in a scientific discipline from an 
institution of recognized standing. Students desiring to enter the program, who do not possess 
a bachelor's degree in a scientific discipline are required to complete with at least a "B" aver- 
age, a number of background courses in mathematics, physics and engineering science prior to 
.admission to the graduate program. Students entering the program without a bachelor's degree 
in Industrial Engineering from an accredited department are required to remove all deficien- 
cies in general professional prerequisites. 

Graduate Record Examination scores will be given consideration in making decisions 
regarding financial assistance. 

PROGRAM OPTIONS AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

For the Master of Science Program three degree options are available, namely, Thesis, 
Project and Course-only. The thesis option requires 24 semester hours of course work and 6 
hours of thesis culminating in scholarly research work. The project option requires 30 semester 
hours of course work and 3 hours of project work. Both the thesis and project options require 
an oral examination and a written report. The Course-only option requires 33 semester hours of 
course work and a 1 semester hour comprehensive exam. To graduate, a student must maintain 
a 3.0 grade point average. 

The Ph.D. program requires a total of 75 semester hours after the B.S. degree, which 
includes 18 semester hours of dissertation work. The Ph.D. program offers specialization in 
Human-Machine Systems Engineering (HMSE), Management Systems Engineering (MSE), 
and Production Systems Engineering (PSE). 

Additional details of requirements for the M.S. and Ph.D. programs in Industrial Engineer- 
ing are outlined in the Graduate Program Student Handbook available from the department. 

List of Courses Credits 

INEN 600 Survey of Industrial Engineering Topics 3 

INEN 615 Industrial Simulation 3 

INEN 618 Total Quality Improvement 3 

INEN 624 Computer-Integrated Design / Manufacturing 3 

INEN 625 Industrial Information Systems 3 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 241 



INEN 632 Robotic Systems and Applications 

INEN 633 Engineering Law and Ethics 

INEN 635 Materials Handling Systems Design 

INEN 648 Biomechanics 

INEN 655 Production Planning & Scheduling 

INEN 658 Project Management 

INEN 664 Systems Safety Engineering and Risk Analysis 

INEN 665 Human-Machine Systems 

INEN 675 Design and Analysis of Experiments 

INEN 685 Selected Topics in Industrial Engineering Var.l- 

INEN 694 Special Projects Var. 1 - 

INEN 721 Systems Engineering Models 

INEN 73 1 Engineering Cost Control 

INEN 734 Engineering Organization 

INEN 735 Human-Computer Interface 

INEN 742 Linear and Integer Programming 

INEN 745 Advanced Computer-Integrated Production Systems 

INEN 812 Advanced Ergonomics 

INEN 813 Cognitive Systems Engineering 

INEN 814 Advanced Topics in Human-Machine Systems 

INEN 821 Multivariate Statistics for Engineering 

INEN 822 Advanced Systems Simulation 

INEN 831 Service Sector Engineering 

INEN 832 Information Technology Management 

INEN 833 Supply Chain Systems Engineering 

INEN 841 Linear and Nonlinear Optimization 

INEN 843 Queuing Theory 

INEN 844 Reliability and Maintenance 

INEN 85 1 Integrated Manufacturing Control Systems 

INEN 852 Integrated Product and Process Design 

INEN 853 Enterprise Integration 

INEN 854 Inventory & Warehouse Systems 

INEN 885 Advanced Special Topics in Industrial Engineering 



M.S. level Pass/Fail Courses 

INEN 792 Industrial Engineering Master's Seminar 

INEN 793 Master's Supervised Teaching 

INEN 794 Master's Supervised Research 

INEN 796 Master's Project 

INEN 797 Master's Thesis Var. 

INEN 799 Continuation of Master's Project/Thesis 



1 
3 
3 
3 
1-3 
1 



Ph.D level Pass/Fail Courses 

INEN 99 1 Doctoral Qualifying Examination 

INEN 992 Doctoral Seminar in Industrial engineering 

INEN 993 Doctoral Supervised Teaching in Industrial Engineering 

INEN 994 Doctoral Supervised Research in Industrial Engineering 

INEN 995 Doctoral Preliminary Examination 

INEN 997 Dissertation Var. 

INEN 999 Continuation of Dissertation 



1 
1 
3 
3 
3 
1-3 
1 



242 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 
Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

INEN-600. Survey of Industrial Engineering Topics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will introduce topics in the following areas of Industrial Engineering: Engineering 
Economy, Linear Programming, Production Control, Methods Engineering, and Statistical Pro- 
cess Control. Prerequisite: Senior/Graduate Standing. 

INEN-615. Industrial Simulation Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course addresses discrete-event simulation languages. One general purpose simulation 

I language is taught in depth. The use of simulation in design and improvement of production 

\ and service systems is emphasized. Term papers and projects will be required. Prerequisite: 

' Senior/Graduate Study. 

! INEN-618. Total Quality Improvement Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides a systematic engineering approach to understanding the philosophy and 
application of Total Quality Improvement (TQI). It also introduces students to Continuous 
Improvement (C) techniques used by management as a means of improving engineering pro- 
1 cesses in order to become and remain competitive in the global marketplace. The CI techniques 
and concepts this course includes a strategic planning, benchmarking, ISO 9000, teamwork, 
customer satisfaction, employee involvement, quality tools, and business process reengineering. 
Design projects are required. Prerequisite: Senior/Graduate Standing. 

INEN-624. Computer-Integrated Design / Manufacture Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course addresses Computer-based tools and techniques for integrated product and process 
i design. Topics include numerical computer-aided design and process planning, group technol- 
' ogy, numerical control, computer numerical control, and direct numerical control, rapid response 
technologies, integrated manufacturing planning, execution, and control and computer-inte- 
grated manufacturing. Design projects are required. Prerequisite: Senior/Graduate Standing. 

INEN-625. Information Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course introduces the planning, design, implementation and evaluation of industrial infor- 
mation systems. Analysis and design techniques, organization of data, current software tools, 
client-server architectures, and current database technologies are presented. The role of infor- 
mation systems in global manufacturing, distribution, and services is addressed. Design projects 
are required. Prerequisite: Senior/Graduate Standing. 

INEN-632. Robotic Systems and Applications Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course addresses design, analysis, implementation and operation of robotics in production 
systems. End effectors, vision systems, sensors, stability and control off-line programming, 
and simulation of robotic systems are covered. Methods for planning robotic work areas are 
emphasized. Design projects are required. Prerequisite: Senior/Graduate Standing. 

INEN-633. Engineering Law and Ethics Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course introduces engineers to law and ethics. Topics include contract law and practices, 
product liability, intellectual property and patent law, research and development contracts, en- 
vironmental law, interstate commerce regulations, labor law, workers' compensation, safety 
regulations, ethical issues involving conflict of interest, and confidentiality. Prerequisite: Se- 
nior/Graduate Standing. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 243 



INEN-635. Materials Handling Systems Design Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course focuses on the design and analysis of materials handling and flow in manufactur- 
ing facilities. Principles, functions, equipment and theoretical approaches in materials handling 
are discussed. Tools for the automation of materials handling are introduced. Design projects 
are required. Prerequisite: Senior/Graduate Standing. 

INEN-648. Biomechanics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers human biomechanical and physiological behavior during work. Quantita- 
tive methods using engineering mechanics principles and computer simulation are emphasized. 
Prerequisite: Senior/Graduate Standing. 

INEN-655. Production Planning & Scheduling Credits 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on the design, control and underlying behavior of manufacturing and ser- 
vice systems with emphasis on quantitative and information technology methods. Topic covered 
in this course include demand forecasting, inventory management, aggregate planning, opera- 
tions scheduling, Material Requirements Planning and Manufacturing Resource Planning, 
Just-in-Time, Theory of Constraints and Supply Chain Management. Projects will be required. 
Prerequisite: Senior/Graduate Standing 

INEN-658. Project Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course addresses project proposal preparation, resource and cost estimation, project plan- 
ning, organizing and controlling, network diagrams, and computerized project planning systems. 
Prerequisite: Senior/Graduate Standing. 

INEN-664. Systems Safety Engineering and Risk Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course presents the principles and methods of system safety management and risk analy- 
sis. Quantitative and qualitative methods and their applications in safety and risk analysis of 
human-machine systems are emphasized. 

INEN-665. Human-Machine Systems Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course emphasizes the application of perceptual, cognitive, and physical ergonomics prin- 
ciples to the design of human-machine systems. Topics covered include physiological limitations, 
cognitive and perceptual issues, task complexity and the demands on physical/cognitive re- 
sources, human-machine system integration, usability and evaluation methods. Design projects 
are required. Prerequisites: Senior/Graduate Standing in ISE or Consent of Instructor. 

INEN-675. Design and Analysis of Experiments Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course addresses various experimental designs, to analyze data for research projects, pro- 
cess improvements, human factors studies, and surveys. Designs covered include Latin Squares, 
complete and incomplete block designs, one, two, and three variable factorials, fractional fac- 
torials, nested designs, and 2k designs. Suitable laboratory apparatus will be set up to study the 
effect of design parameters on selected response. Statistical software will be utilized to analyze 
results. Parametric statistics such as analysis of variance (ANOVA) are introduced. Prerequi- 
site: Senior/Graduate Standing. 

INEN-685. Selected Topics in Industrial Engineering Var. Credit (1-3) 

Selected engineering topics of interest to students and faculty. The topics will be selected be- 
fore the beginning of the course and will be pertinent to the programs of the students enrolled. 
Prerequisite: Senior/Graduate Standing. 



244 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



I] INEN-694. Special Projects Var. Credit (1-3) 

: Study arranged on a special engineering topic of interest to student and faculty member, who 
» will act as advisor. Topics may be analytical and/or experimental and encourage independent 
I! study. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. M.S. and Ph.D. Students Only 

INEN-721. Systems Engineering Models Credit 3 (3-0) 

I This course presents an overview of modern quantitative and computational techniques for 

system modeling, design and control. Topics include fuzzy set theory, neural network, control 
. theory, optimization search methods, Petri-nets, and knowledge-based systems. Prerequisite: 
i Graduate Standing. 

i! INEN-731. Engineering Cost Control Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is designed to emphasize the use of cost data by engineers in support of the finan- 
li cial management function. Cost functions, cost behavior, cash control, budgeting, and cashflow 
ji analysis are discussed. 

INEN-734. Engineering Organization Credit 3 (3-0) 

1 This course presents theories of organizational structures, motivation, leadership, delegation, 
incentives and rewards systems, teams, strategic planning, and personnel evaluation. Prerequi- 
I sites: Graduate Standing and Consent of Instructor. 

INEN-735. Human-Computer Interface Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides a fundamental coverage of topics in human-computer interface (HCI). 
The primary emphasis is on the impact of human characteristics and the use of information 
processing models for HCI-design, usability evaluation, virtual reality, and multimedia sys- 
i tems. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

INEN-742. Linear and Integer Programming Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course addresses solution techniques for linear and integer programming problems. Top- 
ics addressed include initial basic feasible solutions, large scale linear programs, column 
generations, scaling, Dan tzig- Wolfe decomposition, Interior point methods, integer program- 

i ming models, and branch and bound approaches for solving integer programming models. 
Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and Consent of Instructor 

i 
INEN-745. Advanced Computer-Integrated Production Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course addresses the principles relating to integration issues for an automated manufac- 

i turing enterprise. Topics include control architectures, communication networks and standards 
for graphical information interchange. Current research areas will be discussed. Design projects 

i are required. Prerequisites: INEN-624 and INEN-635. 

INEN-792. Industrial Engineering Master's Seminar Credit 1 (1-0) 

This course introduces contemporary industrial engineering topics via talks by individuals from 
industry, government, and academe. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing in ISE. 

INEN-793. Master's Supervised Teaching Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides students with the experience of assisting in instruction and evaluation of 
lecture and laboratory components of industrial engineering courses. Prerequisites: Graduate 
Standing in ISE 

INEN-794. Master's Supervised Research Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides students with the experience of assisting in all aspects of planning and 
completing research projects. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing in ISE 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 245 



INEN-796. Master's Project Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides the student an opportunity to complete a comprehensive industrial engi- 
neering project of their choice under the supervision of a faculty advisor. A project is an 
application of industrial engineering methods and techniques to a specific problem. Students 
are required to complete a project proposal and a final defense in accordance with departmental 
guidelines. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing in ISE 

INEN-797. Master's Thesis Variable Credit (1-3) 

This course provides the student an opportunity to complete a piece of original research, of 
their choice, in industrial engineering, under the supervision of a faculty advisor. Students are 
required to complete a thesis proposal and a final defense in accordance with departmental 
guidelines. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing in ISE 

INEN-799. Continuation of Master's Project / Thesis Credits 1 (1-0) 

This course will enable master's students who have completed all required coursework and all 
project/thesis credits, to complete their project/thesis work. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing 
in ISE 

INEN-812. Advanced Ergonomics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers quantitative and qualitative analysis of human motions in space and time. 
Sample topics include human physiology, anthropometry, human figure modeling, and human 
performance for a set of task requirements and specifications. Design projects are required. 
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

INEN-813. Cognitive Systems Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course examines the principles, theories, and applications of the cognitive basis of system 
design. Topics include models of human and machine information processing, mental models, 
human error, human-centered design, abstraction hierarchy, ecological interface, cognitive task 
analysis, multi-flow models, activity-behavior models, and theories of complexity in 
humanmachine systems. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and Consent of Instructor. 

INEN-814. Advanced Topics in Human-Machine Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course examines advanced topics in human-machine systems. Topics covered include 
supervisory control, human aspects of fixed and programmable automation, theories and mod- 
els of complex systems, collaborative work support systems, human attention and cognitive 
control of dynamic actions, and tele-operations. Applications include supervisory control in 
transportation, process, space operations, waste and hazardous handling, manufacturing, and 
other applications of automated systems. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and Consent of In- 
structor. 

INEN-821. Multivariate Statistics For Engineers Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on methods for statistical analysis of multivariate data. Topics include: 
dimensionality, multidimensional classification and clustering, unstructured multi-response 
sampling, analysis of covariance structures, such as principal components, factor analysis and 
canonical correlation analysis, and multivariate normal distribution and analysis of multivari- 
ate means. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and Consent of Instructor. 

INEN-822. Advanced Systems Simulation Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course discusses advanced statistical issues in the design of simulation experiments: vari- 
ance reduction, regeneration methods, performance optimization and run sampling. Continuous 
simulation models are introduced. High fidelity simulation software and high-level architec- 
ture for constructing large simulation models is introduced. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing 
and Consent of Instructor. 



246 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



INEN-831. Service Sector Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on the application of modeling and analysis of enterprises in the service 
sector of an economy. Topics include the role of the service sector in an economy, special 
characteristics of service operations, structuring the service enterprise, facility design for ser- 
vices, service quality, quantitative models for managing services. Applications in the financial 
services, health care, and other sectors will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing 
and Consent of Instructor. 

INEN-832. Information Technology Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on productivity measurement and improvement of information technology 
and information system services. Other topics covered include the planning and control of 
human resources and budgets, as well as the planning of innovation, entrepreneurship and 
research and development, and the forecasting and justification of technology. Prerequisites: 
Graduate Standing and Consent of Instructor. 

INEN-833. Supply Chain Systems Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course addresses the analysis and design of logistics and supply chain systems. Topics 
covered include: logistics and supply chain characterization, site location, mode selection, dis- 
tribution planning, vehicle routing, demand management, replenishment management, 
geographic information systems and real-time logistics control issues. Prerequisites: Graduate 
Standing and Consent of Instructor. 

INEN-841. Linear and Nonlinear Optimization Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course addresses solution techniques for linear and integer programming problems, and 
iQonlinear optimization. Topics addressed include initial basic feasible solutions, large- scale 
linear programs, column generation, scaling, Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition, interior point 
methods, integer programming models, branch and bound approaches, unconstrained multi- 
variate optimization, and penalty methods. Applications to engineering and economic systems 
are discussed. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

1NEN-843. Queuing Theory Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course presents stochastic models and solution techniques for such models. Specific top- 
ics include elements of queuing systems, measures of performance, arrival processes, steady 
state analysis, stationary arrivals, controlling service processes, priority queues, and queuing 
inetworks. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and Consent of Instructor. 

INEN-844. Reliability and Maintenance Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course reviews the statistical concepts and methods underlying procedures used in reli- 
iability engineering. Topics include the nature of reliability and maintenance, life failure and 
repair distributions, life test strategies, and complex system reliability including: series/parallel/ 
standby components with preventive maintenance philosophy. Analytical models are empha- 
sized. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and Consent of Instructor. 

TNEN-851. Integrated Manufacturing Control Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides an advanced study of systems used for manufacturing execution and shop 
ifloor control. Traditional control and adaptive control algorithms and applications for manu- 
facturing are explored. Integrated control system functions include scheduling, execution 
planning, supervisory control, human machine interface, process control, quality control, and 
information acquisition. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and Consent of Instructor. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 247 



INEN-852. Integrated Product and Process Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides an integrated approach to the design and manufacture of a new product. 
Topics include product requirements, concept generation and selection, design, product opti- 
mization, tolerances, prototype development, design for manufacturability and assembly, process 
optimization, and quality function deployment. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

INEN-853. Enterprise Integration Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is directed toward development and contribution to the advancement of a unified 
framework for conceptualizing, designing, modeling, and operating advanced integrated manu- 
facturing systems. It builds upon emerging developments in computer and communications 
technologies and conceptual breakthroughs regarding the nature and behavior of integrated 
enterprises. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and Consent of Instructor. 

INEN-854. Inventory and Warehouse Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course investigates the integration of inventory and warehouse systems. Quantitative models 
for inventory and warehouse layout/location are developed and solved. Computational tools 
and equipment in inventory and warehouse systems are reviewed. Application of supply chain 
and information technology concepts to strategic inventory and warehouse system integration 
is addressed. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

INEN-885. Advanced Special Topics in Industrial Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

The course will address a current body of knowledge in Industrial Engineering with a research 
orientation. Term papers and projects will be required. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and 
Consent of Instructor. 

INEN-991. Doctoral Qualifying Examination Credit 1 (1-0) 

This course will guide student to take the departmental Qualifying Examination. The examina- 
tion will be administered towards the end of the semester. Pass/Fail evaluation only, no letter 
grade will be given. Prerequisite: Doctoral Standing in ISE. 

INEN 992. Doctoral Seminar in Industrial Engineering Credit 1 (1-0) 

The course will present potential dissertation topics and research work-in-progress by faculty 
members and doctoral students, and talks by eminent practitioners and researchers on classical 
and contemporary topics in Industrial Engineering. Pass/Fail evaluation only, no letter grade 
will be given. Prerequisite: Doctoral Standing in ISE. 

INEN-993. Doctoral Supervised Teaching in Industrial Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 
This course will introduce the student to teaching courses under the guidance of a faculty 
member. This course will give the student experience in course planning, lecture preparation, 
classroom teaching, and student evaluation. Pass/Fail evaluation only; no letter grade will be 
given. Prerequisite: Doctoral Standing in ISE. 

INEN-994. Doctoral Supervised Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is supervised research under the direction of a member of the Graduate Faculty. This 
research should lead to the identification of a dissertation topic. Pass/Fail evaluation only; no 
letter grade will be given. Prerequisite: Doctoral Standing in ISE. 

INEN-995. Doctoral Preliminary Credit 3 (3-0) 

In this course dissertation supervisors will guide their students towards completing the Pre- 
liminary Exam. The Preliminary Exam will consist of presenting and defending the student's 
dissertation proposal, and a written exam in the area of specialization. Pass/Fail evaluation 
only; no letter grade will be given. Prerequisites: Doctoral Standing in ISE and INEN 991. 



248 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



fllNEN-997. Dissertation Variable Credit (1-3) 

This course provides the student an opportunity to complete a significant piece of original 
r research, of their choice, in industrial engineering, under the supervision of a faculty advisor. 
-Students are required to complete a dissertation proposal and a final defense in accordance 
\with departmental guidelines. Prerequisites: Doctoral Standing in ISE and INEN 995. 

(f[NEN-999. Continuation of Dissertation Variable Credit 1 (1-1) 

"Tnis course will enable doctoral students who have completed all required course work and all 
"'dissertation credits, to complete their dissertation research. Prerequisites: Doctoral Standing in 
f§E. 

6 



" Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 249 



Leadership Studies Program 



Dr. Alexander, Director 
aerwin@ncat.edu 
Bluford Library 

(336) 256-2342 

OBJECTIVE 

The objectives of the Leadership Studies Graduate program are to provide theoretical and 
practical experiences that are essential for students pursuing a Doctor of Philosophy degree. 
The interdisciplinary Ph.D. emphasizes diversity, ethics, information technology, informed 
practice and research. In addition, the graduates of this doctoral program in Leadership Studies 
will realize the following interdisciplinary objectives: 

1. Design, evaluate, and interpret the collection and analysis of data and their role in 
leadership and decision-making; 

2 . Critique and recommend technology to support the different components of leadership; 

3. Recognize, develop and incorporate ethical judgment in leadership; 

4. Recognize, value and integrate diversity for developing organizational effectiveness; 

5. Understand theories of motivation and leadership as they influence ethical decision- 
making; and 

6 . Articulate a personal leadership vision that benefits the organization and the members. 

Degree Offered 

Leadership Studies - Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

Program Description 

This is an interdisciplinary program designed for persons who desire positions of leader- 
ship in agriculture, business, industry, science, engineering, education, the military and medi- 
cal fields technology, and who are interested and committed to conducting research in the field 
of Leadership Studies. The program enhances students' scholarship in the field of leadership 
and contributes to the accumulation of new knowledge through research and application in the 
study of leadership. It fosters a scholar/practitioner approach in the preparation of leaders. The 
mission of the program is to expand the knowledge base of concepts and theories of leadership 
through application of research and experiences acquired in the program. 

Degree Requirements 

Students seeking to earn the Doctor of Philosophy in Leadership Studies degree are re- 
quired to complete a minimum of 51 hours, 42 hours of coursework and nine hours of intern- 
ship/research and dissertation writing. The program consists of 24 hours of core courses, nine 
hours of electives, nine hours of research courses, three hours of internship, three hours of 
dissertation research, and a minimum of three hours of dissertation writing. The 24 hours of 
core courses in Leadership Studies must be taken at North Carolina A&T State University. 

The program is designed for full-time and part-time students. All students must complete 
the program within a six-year period. 

Students must obtain and maintain a grade point average (GPA- 3.0) B or better in each of 
the courses completed towards the Ph.D. degree. 

Transfer credit will be awarded a maximum of six credit hours in research courses or any 
elective courses completed beyond the master's degree level. NO transfer credit will be awarded 
for Core Courses. 



250 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Admission Requirements 

Candidates seeking admission to the Leadership Studies Program for the Doctor of Phi- 
losophy degree must meet the following requirements: 

1 . A master's degree from a college or university recognized by a regional or general 
accrediting agency. 

2. A minimum of five years of work experience at the executive or managerial level or a 
minimum of five years in Leadership Studies research. 

3. A completed Graduate Record Exam (GRE) General Test, or the Graduate Manage- 
ment Admissions Test (GMAT), or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT) as applicable to 
the discipline area of the student. 

4. An applicant with his/her highest degree from a non-English-speaking country is re- 
quired to complete the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) examination 
and obtain a score of 600 or higher on the written examination or at least 250 on the 
computer examination. 

5. An applicant will be interviewed by an Admissions Committee as part of the admis- 
sion requirements prior to recommendation for final acceptance into the program. 

'Note: These requirements will be reviewed periodically and revisions made as appropriate. 

] Documentation Requirements 

The following documents are to be submitted by all applicants. 

1. Two official transcripts of all college-level academic work. 

2. Three letters of recommendation (for study at master's level) from professional asso- 
ciates or supervising faculty /professors from the degree granting institution. 

3 . An official copy of the GRE, GMAT, or MAT scores mailed directly to the University 
from the testing agency. 

4. An official copy of the TOEFL score, if applicable, mailed directly to the University 
from the testing agency. 

5 . The completed application form and application fee stipulated by the School of Gradu- 
ate Studies at NC A&T State University. 

6. A Statement of Purpose (two pages and double-spaced) explaining the reasons for 
pursuing the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Leadership Studies and detailing profes- 
sional work experience or leadership research background. The Statement will also 
be used to evaluate writing proficiency. 

\ 

Candidacy 

Following the successful documentation and completion of the internship as approved by 
the committee, the student will be admitted into candidacy for the interdisciplinary Ph.D. in 
1 Leadership Studies. The candidate will then enroll in three hours of supervised dissertation 
'research and three hours of supervised dissertation writing and upon the successful defense of 
1 the dissertation, the candidate will be awarded the doctoral degree (Ph.D.) in Leadership Stud- 
ues. Should the candidate require more than the six hours of dissertation research and writing, 
i the candidate will enroll for additional hours provided the six-year limit has not been exceeded. 

Dissertation Committee 

The committee will have at least four members including the chair. At the end of eighteen 

i hours of study, the students are required to select their four- person dissertation committee. This 

| committee will be chaired by a faculty from the Leadership Studies Faculty. The additional 

[ committee members will consist of North Carolina A&T Faculty including eminent leaders 

and adjunct faculty. 

Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 25 1 

i 



The Dissertation 

The doctoral dissertation presents the results of the student's original investigation in the 
field of major interest. It must be a contribution to knowledge, be adequately supported by data 
and be written in a manner consistent with the highest standards of scholarship. Publication is 
expected. 

The dissertation will be reviewed by all members of the advisory committee and must 
receive their approval prior to submission to the School of Graduate Studies. Three copies of 
the document signed by all members of the student's advisory committee must be submitted to 
the School of Graduate Studies by a specified deadline in the semester or summer session in 
which the degree is to be conferred. Prior to final approval, the dissertation will be reviewed by 
the School of Graduate Studies to ensure that the format conforms to its specifications. 

The University has a requirement that all doctoral dissertations be microfilmed by Univer- 
sity Microfilms International of Ann Arbor, Michigan, which includes publication of the ab- 
stract in Dissertation Abstracts International. The student is required to pay for the microfilming 
service. 

Courses Description 

LEST 800. Leadership Theories Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course explores the theoretical nature of leadership. The emphasis is on the application of 
theories of leadership in political, economic, social, and global contexts. A critical examination 
of the leadership literature and research are used to develop an appreciation for the contin- 
gency and interdisciplinary nature of leadership. 

LEST 802. Decision-Making Theories and Strategies Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on the development and enhancement of strategic decision-making capa- 
bilities. It explores the theories and principles of executive decision-making processes such as 
qualitative decision-making models and techniques. A related emphasis is on effective commu- 
nication with diverse groups, and implementation and evaluation of strategic decisions. Other 
topics include power and politics, managerial cognition, strategy formulation, organizational 
learning, organizational information processing, ethical decision-making, and the influence of 
technology on strategic decisions. 

LEST 810. Ethics and Social Responsibility in Leadership Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on the ethical and legal dimensions of leadership, including multiple phi- 
losophies and theories. This course will provide an examination and interpretation of complex 
issues from the perspective of ethical leadership and diversity. 

LEST 811. Human Behaviors and Relations Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on human relations theory and practice in various contexts. Emphasis is 
placed on the role of leaders as ethical change agents at the behavioral, interpersonal, organiza- 
tional, and societal levels. Additionally, in-depth studies of human behavior theories will focus 
on human motivation, self- awareness, interpersonal skills and group dynamics, worldview, hu- 
man relations, human interaction with technology, and personal and organizational diversity. 

LEST 812. Contemporary Issues in Cultural Diversity Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on current issues in diverse cultures and the development of cultural un- 
derstanding and knowledge of the literature, history, language, art, music, and social/political 
systems of a diverse culture. 



252 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



LEST 820. Information Technology as a Leadership Tool Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on the interaction of information technology and society and how the 
functioning of organizations are both enhanced and constrained by information technology. 
Topics of study include the ethical use of technology, technology and decision making, tech- 
inology as a management tool, technology as a teaming tool, technology as a leadership 
assessment and performance tool, and networks and the Internet. 

LEST 840. Organizational Structure and Dynamics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course examines the major theories in the study of effective organizational designs. The 
emphasis is on the creation and use of vertical and horizontal networks of interdependent and 
interrelated relationships among functional and operating units to provide the organization 
with adaptive capacity to respond effectively to a rapidly changing environment. 

LEST 850. Leadership in the Global Economy and Society Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will focus on effective and ethical global leadership in the areas of decision-mak- 
ing, problem-solving, competencies for addressing relationships, communication, teambuilding, 
leading visions into actions. Additionally, the course will emphasize stress and conflict man- 
agement, interdependent thinking, valuing the ability to advance the work of the institution's 
place in global society, communities and cultural awareness technology and global perspec- 
tives. 
i 

LEST 860. Qualitative Research Credit (3-0) 

This course focuses on methods and tools of inquiry of qualitative research, including but not 
ilimited to developing case studies, surveys, interviews and narrative observations. Strategies 
for determining the intertextuality of trends and relationships as revealed in the research will 
be developed. 

LEST 861. Computer Aided Research (prerequisite Basic Research) Credit 3 (3-0) 
This course focuses on three areas of application of the computer in research: development and 
literature reviews, data collection and statistical analysis, and the presentation of findings, con- 
clusions, and recommendations. Students will develop a synthesis of knowledge and skill in 
.applying the computer as a tool for research. 

LEST 862. Quantitative Research Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides a fundamental introduction to the field of quantitative research through 
the development of a knowledge base and an application of research skills and methodologies 
required to select, read, and interpret relevant professional literature. 

LEST 863. Statistical Applications and Interpretations Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will focus on research and case study design emphasizing implementation strate- 
gies that address organizational policies and practice. A review of paradigm shifts and an analysis 
of literature in leadership will focus on cultural and technological influences. In addition, the 
course will enhance students' understanding of how various public, private and corporate agen- 
cies are changed based on the governance and administration. 

LEST 870. Internship in Leadership Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides inquiry, exploration, and hands-on opportunities to observe and partici- 
pate in leadership decisions. The internship will be one of professional practice internship in a 
leadership environment. The internship will be with a recognized business, industry, govern- 
ment or non-governmental leader or in an organization that emphasizes leadership. It will inform 
the student of current practice and lead to the dissertation research. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 253 



LEST 900. Dissertation Research Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on the development of the dissertation proposal. The dissertation research 
is embedded in the internship experience that ensures a comprehensive application and utiliza- 
tion of research. 

LEST 930. Dissertation Writing Credit 3 (3-0) 

Dissertation writing is the culminating course in the student's doctoral program. The student 
will demonstrate high levels of scholarly and intellectual activity. Dissertation writing is an 
original contribution to knowledge in the field of study through disciplined inquiry. This course 
prepares a student for conducting, writing, and defending the dissertation in accordance with 
the highest professional standards. 

LEST 999. Continuation of Doctoral Dissertation Credit 1 (1-0) 

This course is a continuation of LEST 930. This course is for doctoral students who have 
completed all credit course hour requirements. 

LIST OF GRADUATE COURSES 

The Leadership Core - (24 Credit Hours) 

LEST 800 - Leadership Theories * 

LEST 802 - Decision-Making Theories and Strategies * 

LEST 810 - The Role of Ethics in Leadership * 

LEST 8 1 1 - Human Behaviors and Relations * 

LEST 812 - Contemporary Issues in Cultural Diversity * 

LEST 820 - Information Technology as a Leadership Tool * 

LEST 840 - Organizational Structure and Dynamics * 

LEST 850 - Leadership in the Global Economy and Society * 

Research Preparation Courses - (18 Credit Hours) 

LEST 860 - Qualitative Courses ** 

LEST 861 - Computer Assisted Research ** 

LEST 862 - Quantitative Research ** 

LEST 863 - Statistical Applications and Interpretations** 

LEST 870 - Internship in Leadership ** 

LEST 900 - Dissertation Research ** 

LEST 930 - Dissertation Writing ** 

LEST 999 - Continuation of Doctoral Dissertation** 

Elective Discipline Courses - (9 Credit Hours) 

School of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences 

AGED 710 - Program Design, Management, and Evaluation*** 

AGED 797 - Agricultural Education Program Management Plan Project*** 

School of Business and Economics 

BUAD 712 - Foundations of Enterprise Management*** 

BUAD 713 - Business Applications Development*** 

BUAD 715 - Quantitative Business Analysis*** 

BUAD 716 - Strategic Marketing*** 

BUAD 718 - Management and Organizational Analysis*** 

BUAD 730 - Human Resources Management*** 

BUAD 735 - Contemporary Issues in Human Resources Management*** 

BUAD 736 - Human Resources Management Strategy*** 



254 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



iBUAD 746 - E-Business and E-Commerce Management*** 
TRAN 701 - Strategic Logistics Management*** 
iTRAN 725 - Purchasing and Materials Management*** 
1TRAN 727 - Global Supply Chain Management*** 

," School of Education 

! ADED 773 - Leadership*** 

l CUIN 709 - Administration and Supervision*** 

CUIN 7 1 1 - Research and Inquiry*** 
: CUIN 716 - Media Center Management*** 
[CUIN 767 - Computer Lab Supervision and Management*** 
I MS A 771 - Diversity Issues in Administration*** 
?MSA 772 - Administration, Management, and Supervision*** 
^MSA 773 - Issues in Educational Administration*** 
i-MSA 774 - Curriculum and Instructional Leadership*** 
J MSA 776 - Law, Policy, and Politics of Education*** 

MSA 777 - Ethical and Societal Aspects of Educational Leadership*** 

MSA 778 - The Principalship*** 

I College of Engineering 

AREN 753 - Building Facilities Planning and Project Management*** 

AREN 755 - Computer-Aided Project Management*** 

AREN 770 - Energy Management Planning*** 
IINEN 721 - Systems Engineering Models*** 
(INEN 731 - Engineering Cost Control*** 
(INEN 735 - Human-Computer Interface*** 
(INEN 813 - Cognitive Systems Engineering*** 
f INEN 814 - Advanced Topics in Human-Machine Systems*** 
IINEN 821 - Multivariate Statistics for Engineers*** 
ilNEN 822 - Advanced Systems Simulation*** 
I INEN 831 - Service Sector Engineering*** 
IINEN 832 - Information Technology Management*** 
IINEN 833 - Supply Chain Systems Engineering*** 
IINEN 831 - Service Sector Engineering*** 
IINEN 832 - Information Technology Management*** 
IINEN 833 - Supply Chain Systems Engineering*** 
IINEN 853 - Enterprise Integration*** 

; School of Technology 

EECT 730 - Systems Integration for Telecommunications Managers*** 

IGCS 733 - Graphic Communications Organization and Management*** 

^MFG 775 - Production Management and Control*** 

^MSIT 740 - Leadership Development Seminar*** 

?MSIT 790 - Research Methods*** 

1TECH 767 - Research and Literature in Technological Education*** 

1TECH 768 - Technological Seminar*** 

iTECH 770 - Systematic Design of Training and Development for Industry*** 

* = Core Courses required for all students - No Transfer 
** = Research Preparation and Dissertation Courses 
*** = Elective Courses (Discipline Specialization) 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 255 



Management Information Systems 



Edna J. Ragins, Chairperson 

Room 325 Merrick Hall 

(336) 334-7656 

OBJECTIVE 

The Department of Business Administration offers a program of study leading to the Mas- 
ter of Science in Management degree with a major concentration in Management Information 
Systems (MIS). The program prepares students and professionals for careers in public and 
private sector positions in information systems management, or to apply MIS concepts to other 
business disciplines. 

DEGREE OFFERED 

Master of Science in Management - Management Information Systems 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The general requirements for admission are an undergraduate degree from an accredited 
institution with a minimum grade point average of 2.6 (on a 4.0 scale), and a satisfactory 
GMAT score. Applicants who do not meet the requirements will be considered on an individual 
basis. A GPA of 3.0 is required for graduation. 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

Students with a variety of undergraduate majors are encouraged to apply. The program is 
designed to appeal to those who either currently work in industry or desire to affiliate with firms 
or organizations using cutting-edge tools to deliver their products or services. Students in the 
program will have a business undergraduate degree and wish to study a particular area in greater 
depth, or have a non-business degree with the personal or professional interests or experiences 
that would be enhanced by a quality graduate program in management education. 

The program requires a minimum of 36 semester hours. There is no thesis requirement. 
Students without an undergraduate business degree will be required to take appropriate foun- 
dation courses, which may extend the requirements to 48 semester hours. The program consists 
of 21 hours of core courses, including one 3-hour elective, and 15 hours of coursework in the 
major concentration. 

The student pursuing the Master of Science in Management with a major concentration in 
MIS is required to complete a common core of courses consisting of: 



ACCT 714 Managerial Accounting & Finance 

BUAD 7 1 3 Business Applications Development 

BUAD 715 Quantitative Business Analysis 

BUAD 7 1 6 Strategic Marketing 

BUAD 7 1 8 Management & Organization Analysis 

ECON 608 Managerial Economics 

ELECTIVE One course selected from the following: 

ACCT 643 Advanced Income Tax Accounting 

BUAD 719 Information Systems Planning & Design 



3 semester hours 
3 semester hours 
3 semester hours 
3 semester hours 
3 semester hours 
3 semester hours 



3 semester hours 
3 semester hours 



256 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Courses in the MIS concentration will consist of the following: 

! BUAD 740 Management & Implementation of MIS 3 semester hours 

i BUAD 742 Telecommunication Systems Management 3 semester hours 

[ BUAD 744 Enterprise Data Modeling 3 semester hours 

! BUAD 746 E-Business and E-Commerce 3 semester hours 

! BUAD 748 MIS Projects 3 semester hours 

Students without an undergraduate business degree will be required to take appropriate foun- 
dation courses, which consist of the following. 

ACCT 708 Seminar in Financial Concepts 3 semester hours 

i BUAD 705 Seminar in Business Analysis 3 semester hours 

i BUAD 712 Foundations of Enterprise Management 3 semester hours 

[ ECON 706 Seminar in Economics 3 semester hours 

LIST OF GRADUATE COURSES 

i Course Description Credit 

ACCT 643 Advanced Income Tax Accounting 3 

ACCT 708 Seminar in Financial Concepts 3 

ACCT 714 Managerial Accounting & Finance 3 

BUAD 705 Seminar in Business Analysis 3 

BUAD 712 Foundations of Enterprise Management 3 

; BUAD 713 Business Applications Development 3 

I BUAD 715 Quantitative Business Analysis 3 

I BUAD 716 Strategic Marketing 3 

I BUAD 718 Management & Organization Analysis 3 

1 BUAD 719 Information Systems Planning & Design 3 

1 BUAD 740 Management & Implementation of MIS 3 

! BUAD 742 Telecommunication Systems Management 3 

1 BUAD 744 Enterprise Data Modeling 3 

i BUAD 746 E-Business and E-Commerce 3 

1 BUAD 748 MIS Projects 3 

! ECON 608 Managerial Economics 3 

1 ECON 706 Seminar in Economics 3 

COURSES WITH DESCRIPTION IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

] BUAD-705. Seminar in Business Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will integrate the statistical and mathematical concepts that are essential for iden- 
t tifying, analyzing, and solving complex business problems. Business applications will involve 
i investment, inventory, and capital budgeting analyses, utilizing computer spreadsheet models 
i and the Visual Basic programming language. 

I BUAD-712. Foundations of Enterprise Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

' This course provides an understanding of key themes related to successful enterprise manage- 
i ment, and discussions of the interpersonal and intellectual skills necessary to contribute to a 
! highly competitive and globalized business environment. Topics include the globalization of 
commerce, marketing and market systems, competitive strategy, perspectives on legal and ethical 
business conduct, information technology, and the elements of quality. Individual and team 
competencies are developed using materials that involve interpersonal skills, problem-solving, 
and case analysis. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 257 



BUAD 713. Business Applications Development Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on application development and tools for business solutions. Concepts 
associated with the design, creation, and implementation of computer programs are studied. 
Application algorithms are designed using supportive software tools such as flowcharts, 
pseudocode, and hierarchy charts. Emphasis is placed on the development of applications us- 
ing systems methods, top-down design, testing, debugging, modularity, and structured techniques 
to be implemented and maintained in a variety of business environments. This course uses an 
object-oriented programming language. 

BUAD-715. Quantitative Business Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course familiarizes students with basic quantitative techniques for decision-making in all 
business functions. Specific topics will include data collection and presentation; basic descrip- 
tive statistics and probability; discrete and continuous probability distributions; confidence 
intervals; hypothesis testing; business forecasting; linear and multiple regression models; lin- 
ear, integer, and nonlinear programming; and computer simulation. Emphasis will be on the 
application of these techniques for managerial decision-making. Prerequisite: ACCT 708, BUAD 
705 , BUAD 7 1 2 and ECON 706 . 

BUAD-716. Strategic Marketing Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides in-depth examination of the role of marketing in strategic planning and 
decision-making. Students develop skills critical to directing business-unit marketing strategy 
and designing or reengineering a customer-driven organization. The course content empha- 
sizes cases and readings. It also exposes students to emerging issues in marketing strategy 
including relationship marketing and e-commerce. Prerequisite: ACCT 708, BUAD 705, BUAD 
712 and ECON 706. 

BUAD-718. Management and Organizational Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a study of formal organizations as rational, organic, open systems and their 
behavior in response to an ever-changing, global and domestic environment. It covers macro 
and micro theories of management and organizations and their application to organizational 
design and processes. Organizational effectiveness, strategic planning and control, structural 
designs, leadership, motivation, globalization, and corporate politics and culture are studied 
through extensive reading, case studies, exploratory research and seminar discussions. Prereq- 
uisite: ACCT 708, BUAD 705, BUAD 712 and ECON 706. 

BUAD 719. Information Systems Planning and Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides students with an understanding of the concepts of planning, analysis, 
design, and implementation of modern information systems. Techniques used in this course are 
project tracking, structured analysis and design, prototyping, and techniques for incorporating 
human factors considerations. These project planning and design issues will be discussed both 
in terms of the traditional systems development life cycle and in terms of business process 
reengineering. Students will use both Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools, 
Business Process Reengineering (BPR) and Project Tracking (GANTT network diagrams, task 
tracking) tools in their project work. 

BUAD-740. Management and Implementation of Enterprise 

Information Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is an applied course in concepts and techniques used in the design, development, and 
implementation of management information systems and decision support systems using sys- 
tems design concepts and software development tools for web enabled applications. The 
implementation issues of organizational fit and organizational diffusion will be discussed along 
with security and ethics. Prerequisite: ACCT 708, BUAD 705, BUAD 712 and ECON 706. 



258 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



BUAD-742. Telecommunications Systems Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides in-depth coverage of data communications applications and the manage- 
ment of telecommunications hardware and software. Emphasis is on analysis and design of 
metworking applications, management of telecommunications networks, and evaluation of con- 
nectivity options. Topics to be covered include: telecommunications devices, media systems, 
network hardware and software, network configuration, network applications, cost-benefit analy- 
sis, topologies and reliability. Prerequisite: ACCT 708, BUAD 705, BUAD 712 and ECON 706. 

BUAD-744. Enterprise Data Modeling Credit 3 (3-0) 

From a business "perspective, this course will analyze databases to facilitate surveillance and 
scanning for reverse competitive intelligence and for gathering data on customers and com- 
petitors. From an information perspective it will cover distributed databases, database integrity 
land security, data warehousing, data modeling tools, data dictionaries, and query language. 
'Students will make extensive use of database systems. Prerequisite: BUAD 740 or BUAD 742. 

BUAD-746. E-Business and E-Commerce Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a comprehensive overview of building and managing an e-business. Topics ex- 
amined include: the decision to bring a business online, choosing a business model, developing 
a business plan, accepting payments, marketing strategies, and security. A complete web-based 
e-business storefront will be designed and developed based on a viable business model and 
marketing plan. Prerequisite: BUAD 740 or BUAD 742. 

BUAD-748. MIS Projects Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course requires an applied project designed to provide students with the necessary skills 
to manage the development of technology-based solutions for opportunities faced by organi- 
zations today. Students gain practical experience in enabling change through the use of 
information technology. Students work in faculty-supervised teams with sponsoring businesses. 
Project deliverables include: analysis and evaluation of existing business processes, evaluation 
of alternatives for improvement, potential for IT work process improvement, demonstration of 
feasibility, and an implementation plan. Prerequisite: BUAD 740, BUAD 742 and BUAD 744 
or BUAD 746. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 259 



Mathematics 



Wilbur L. Smith, Chairman 
102 Marteena Hall 

(336) 334-7822 

OBJECTIVE 

The School of Graduate Studies through the Department of Mathematics offers two cur- 
ricula leading to the Master of Science in Education. One is intended primarily for individuals 
who teach mathematics at the middle school or high school level and the other is intended for 
individuals who teach mathematics at the high school or two-year college level. In addition, it 
offers a program of studies leading to the M.S. degree in Applied Mathematics. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Master of Science - Mathematics Education 
Master of Science - Applied Mathematics 

GENERAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Mathematics Education and Applied Mathematics students must follow the general ad- 
mission requirements for graduate studies; Mathematics Education students must also satisfy 
the following criteria for admission to the program. 

• A Bachelor's degree in Mathematics or a related field from an accredited institution. 

• North Carolina "A" license in Secondary Mathematics or the equivalent from another 
state or eligibility to hold an "A" certification. 

• An undergraduate GPA of 2.60 overall or 3 .0 in the junior/senior years. 

• Three (3) letters of recommendation. 

• Official scores on GRE (Graduation Record Examination) or the MAT (Miller Analo- 
gies Test). Tests must be taken within the last five (5) years. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to meeting general requirements specified above, a student seeking admission 
to a graduate program in the Department of Mathematics must have earned thirty (30) semester 
hours in mathematics including differential and integral calculus, linear algebra and differen- 
tial equations. A student who fails to meet these requirements will be expected to enroll in 
appropriate undergraduate courses before beginning his graduate studies in mathematics. A 
student may not receive graduate credit for a course that is equivalent to one for which he 
received a grade of "C" or above as an undergraduate. 

MATHEMATICS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

Students may select either the thesis or non-thesis option. Each option requires a total of 
thirty-nine (39) semester hours: fifteen ( 1 5) semester hours in Professional Education , twentyone 
(21) semester hours in Mathematics, and three (3) semester hours of electives. 

All Mathematics Education students must complete the core courses specified in the de- 
scription of general requirements for a Master of Science in Education. The five (5) core Pro- 
fessional Education courses required are as follows: 

Courses Description 

CUIN 619 Learning Theories 

CUIN 7 1 1 Research and Inquiry 



260 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



'CUIN 721 Advanced Methods and Internship 

■CUIN 728 Technology Across the Curriculum 

CUIN 729 Diversity 

Each Mathematics Education student must complete at least one ( 1 ) course from each of 
the five (5) major areas of study. Students completing the Middle School/High School Cur- 
riculum must take a minimum of one (1) 700 level course in Mathematics. Students complet- 
ing the High-School-2 year College Curriculum must take a minimum of three (3) 700 level 
courses in Mathematics. 

iThe five major areas of study include: 



Algebra: 
MATH 602 
MATH 612 
MATH 665 
MATH 712 
MATH 7 17 
Analysis: 
MATH 603 
MATH 610 
MATH 611 
MATH 620 
MATH 650 
MATH 651 
MATH 700 
MATH 711 
MATH 720 
MATH 751 
MATH 752 
Geometry: 
MATH 604 
MATH 715 
Statistics: 
MATH 608 
MATH 623 
MATH 624 
MATH 706 
MATH 708 
MATH 721 



Modern Algebra 
Advanced Linear Algebra 
Principles of Optimization 
Numerical Linear Algebra 
Special Topics in Algebra 

Introduction to Real Analysis 

Complex Variables I 

Complex Variables II 

Elements of Set Theory and Topology 

Ordinary Differential Equations 

Partial Differential Equations 

Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable I 

Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable II 

Special Topics in Analysis 

Solution Methods in Integral Equations 

Calculus of Variations and Control Theory 

Modern Geometry for Secondary School Teachers 
Projective Geometry 



Methods of Applied Statistics 

Probability Theory and Applications 

Theory and Methods of Statistics 

Categorical Data Analysis 

Nonparametric Statistics 

Multivariate Statistical Analysis 
Applications of Technology in Mathematics: 

MATH 601 Technology and Applications in Secondary School Mathematics 

MATH 608 Methods of Applied Statistics 

MATH 624 Theory and Methods of Statistics 
MATH 63 1 Linear and Non-Linear Programming 

MATH 665 Principles of Optimization 

MATH 706 Categorical Data Analysis 

MATH 708 Nonparametric Statistics 

MATH 7 1 2 Numerical Linear Algebra 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



261 



MATH 721 Multivariate Statistical Analysis 

MATH 731 Advanced Numerical Methods 

MATH 765 Optimization Theory and Applications 

Other Requirements: 

1 . Thesis or Research Project or Portfolio 

2. Comprehensive Examination in Mathematics 

3 . Comprehensive Examination in Education 

APPLIED MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM 

A student seeking the Master of Science in Applied Mathematics must complete the fol- 
lowing: 

1 . At least fifteen semester hours of 700-level courses in either mathematics or an applica- 
tions area of mathematics. 

2. A minimum of eighteen semester hours of credit in the Department of Mathematics. 

3. A thesis or a project. 

4. A minimum of thirty semester hours of graduate credit. 

Courses 

MATH 600 Introduction to Modern Mathematics for Secondary School Teachers 

MATH 60 1 Technology and Applications in Secondary School Mathematics 

MATH 602 Modern Algebra 

MATH 603 Introduction to Real Analysis 

MATH 604 Modern Geometry for Secondary School Teachers 

MATH 606 Mathematics for Chemists 

MATH 607 Theory of Numbers 

MATH 608 Methods of Applied Statistics 

MATH 610 Complex Variables I 

MATH 611 Complex Variables II 

MATH 6 1 2 Advanced Linear Algebra 

MATH 620 Elements of Set Theory and Topology 

MATH 623 Probability Theory and Applications 

MATH 624 Theory and Methods of Statistics 

MATH 625 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers I 

MATH 626 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers II 

MATH 63 1 Linear and Non-Linear Programming 

MATH 632 Games and Queuing Theory 

MATH 633 Stochastic Processes 

MATH 650 Ordinary Differential Equations 

MATH 65 1 Partial Differential Equations 

MATH 652 Methods of Applied Mathematics 

MATH 665 Principles of Optimization 

MATH 675 Graph Theory 

MATH 69 1 Special Topics in Applied Mathematics 

MATH 700 Theory of Functions of a Real Variable I 

MATH 701 Theory of Functions of a Real Variable II 

MATH 705 Graduate Seminar 

MATH 706 Categorical Data Analysis 

MATH 708 Nonparametric Statistics 

MATH 710 Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable I 



262 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



' MATH 711 Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable II 

MATH 712 Numerical Linear Algebra 

MATH 715 Projective Geometry 

MATH 7 1 7 Special Topics in Algebra 

MATH 720 Special Topics in Analysis 

MATH 721 Multivariate Statistical Analysis 

MATH 723 Advanced Topics in Applied Mathematics 

MATH 725 Graduate Design Project 

MATH 730 Thesis Research in Mathematics 

MATH 73 1 Advanced Numerical Methods 

MATH 75 1 Solution Methods in Integral Equations 

MATH 752 Calculus of Variations and Control Theory 

•MATH 765 Optimization Theory and Applications 

MATH 733 Advanced Probability and Stochastic Processes 

MATH 781 Mathematical and Computational Modeling 

MATH 782 Scientific Visualization 

MATH 791 Interdisciplinary Computational Science Team Project I 

MATH 792 Interdisciplinary Computational Science Team Project II 

COURSES WITH DESCRIPTION IN MATHEMATICS 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

\MATH-600. Introduction to Modern Mathematics for Secondary School 

Teachers Credit 3 (3-0) 

^Elementary theory of sets, elementary logic and propositional systems, nature and methods of 
imathematical proofs, structure of the real number system. Open only to in-service teachers or 
to others having the permission of the Department of Mathematics. 

JMATH-601. Technology and Applications in Secondary School 

Mathematics Credit 3 (3-0) 

IThis course covers techniques of teaching algebra, advanced algebra, trigonometry, and other 
-secondary mathematics using graphing calculators, software packages and other technology. 
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

MATH-602. Modern Algebra Credit 3 (3-0) 

IThis course covers mappings, binary operations, groups, rings, integral domains, fields, and 
some applications to coding and cryptography. Prerequisite: MATH 31 1 or consent of the in- 
structor. 

*MATH-603. Introduction to Real Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

IThe following topics will be covered in this course: elementary set theory, functions, axiomatic 
development of the real number system, metric spaces, convergent sequences, completeness, 
: compactness, connectedness, continuity, limits, sequences of functions, differentiation, the mean 
* value theorem, Taylor's theorem, Reimann integration, infinite series, the fixed point theorem, 
partial differentiation, and the implicit function theorem. Prerequisite: MATH-311 or consent 
of the instructor. 

MATH-604. Modern Geometry for Secondary School Teachers Credit 3 (3-0) 

l Re-examination of Euclidean geometry, axiomatic systems and the Hilbert axioms, introduc- 
tion to projective geometry and other non-Euclidean geometries. Prerequisite: MATH-600 or 
consent of the Department of Mathematics. 

Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 263 



MATH-606. Mathematics for Chemists Credit 3 (3-0) 

Review of those principles of mathematics involved in chemical computations and derivations 
from general chemistry through physical chemistry; topics covered include significant figures, 
methods of expressing large and small numbers, algebraic operations, trigonometric functions 
and an introduction to calculus. 

MATH-607. Theory of Numbers Credit 3 (3-0) 

Divisibility properties of the integers, the Euclidean algorithm, congruences, diophan tine equa- 
tions, number-theoretic functions and continued fractions. Prerequisite: Twenty hours of college 
mathematics. 

MATH-608. Methods of Applied Statistics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course introduces the SAS programming language and uses it in the analysis of variance, 
both single and multi-factor. It includes various methods of hypothesis testing and constructing 
confidence intervals. The course covers simple and multiple linear regression, including model 
building and variable selection techniques. Elements of time series and categorical data analy- 
sis are covered. Prerequisite: MATH-224. 

MATH-610. Complex Variables I Credit 3 (3-0) 

The following topics will be covered in this course: complex number system, limits of complex 
sequences, complex functions, continuity, limits of functions, derivatives, elementary func- 
tions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, antiderivatives harmonic functions, inverse functions, power 
series, analytic functions, analytic continuation, contour integrals, Cauchy's theorem and 
Cauchy's integral formula. Prerequisite: MATH-231. 

MATH-611. Complex Variables II Credit 3 (3-0) 

MATH-611 is a continuation of MATH-610. The following topics will be covered in this 
course: Liouville's theorem, the fundamental theorem of algebra, the winding number, gener- 
alized Cauchy theorems, singularities, residue calculus, Laurent series, boundary value problems, 
harmonic functions, conformal mappings, Poisson's formula, potential theory, physical appli- 
cations and the Riemann mapping theorem. Prerequisite: MATH-610. 

MATH-612. Advanced Linear Algebra Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices determinants and sys- 
tems of linear equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, inner products, bilinear 
quadratic forms, canonical forms, and application to engineering and applied sciences. Prereq- 
uisite: MATH-450 or consent of the instructor. 

MATH-620. Elements of Set Theory and Topology Credit 3 (3-0) 

Operations on sets, indexed families of sets, products of sets, relations, functions, metric spaces, 
general topological spaces, continuity, compactness and connectedness. Prerequisites: MATH- 
23 1 and consent of the instructor. 

MATH-623. Probability Theory and Applications Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course begins with an introduction to sample spaces and probability, including 
combinatorices. It covers continuous and discrete random variables, including multivariate, 
random variables and expectations; also marginal and conditional distributions are derived. 
The course introduces moment generating functions, and covers the central limit theorem and 
its applications. Prerequisite: MATH-231. 

MATH-624. Theory and Methods of Statistics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course introduces methods of statistical estimation and inference including the following 
topics: sufficient statistics, confidence sets, hypothesis tests, and maximum likelihood meth- 



264 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



'ods. The theory of uniformly most powerful tests and the Neyman-Pearson Lemma are cov- 
ered. Other topics include least squares estimation, the linear model, and Bayesian methods. 
.Prerequisite: MATH-623. 

MATH-625. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers, K-8, 1 Credit 3 (3-0) 

Designed for in-service and prospective teachers who have as their goal "to teach the basic 
skills and competencies of mathematics sought in today's world." The course emphasizes that 
the teacher, first, must have the knowledge and skills in order to accomplish this goal. It stresses 
fundamentals of arithmetic, sets and operations, number systems, fractions, decimals, percents, 
estimation, consumer arithmetic, problem solving and traditional and metric geometry and 
measurement. This course may not be used for degree credit. 

MATH-626. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers, K-8, II Credit 3 (3-0) 

i (Formerly 3686) 

! A continuation of MATH-625. No credit towards a degree in mathematics; not open to second- 
ary school teachers of mathematics. Credit on elementary education degree. Prerequisite: 
MATH-625. 

Bf ATH-631. Linear and Non-Linear Programming Credit 3 (3-0) 

i This course covers optimization subject to linear constraints, transportation problems, simplex 
method, network flows, applications of linear programming to industrial problems and eco- 
' nomic theory, and an introduction to non-linear programming. Prerequisites: MATH-450 and 
t consent of the instructor. 

! MATH-632. Games and Queue Theory Credit 3 (3-0) 

(General introduction to game theory; two-person-non-zero-sum-non-cooperative games; 
itwoperson cooperative games; reasonable outcomes and values; the minimax theorem. Intro- 
iduction to queuing theory; single server queuing processes; many serve queuing processes; 

applications to economics and business. Prerequisites: MATH-224, MATH-450 or consent of 

the instructor. 

! MATH-633. Stochastic Processes Credit 3 (3-0) 

! This course begins with a review of Probability and Random Variables. Markov Processes, 
1 Poisson Processes, Waiting Times, Renewal Phenomena, Branching Processes, Queuing Sys- 
tern, Service Times are covered. Prerequisite: MATH-623 or consent of the instructor. 

MATH-650. Ordinary Differential Equations Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is an intermediate course in ordinary differential equations with emphasis on applications. 
Topics include linear systems and various phase plane techniques for non-linear ordinary dif- 
ferential equations. Prerequisite: MATH-431. 

MATH-651. Partial Differential Equations Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course includes introduction to complex variables and residue calculus, transform calcu- 
lus, higher order partial differential equations governing various physical phenomena, 
nonhomogeneous boundary value problems, orthogonal expressions, Green's functions and 
variational principles. Prerequisites: MATH-431, 432. 

MATH-652. Methods of Applied Mathematics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers matrix theory, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, eigenvalue prob- 
lem and its applications to systems of linear ODEs and mechanical vibrations, the simplest 
problems of calculus of variations, Euler equations, boundary conditions, extensions of Euler 
equations, Hamilton's Principles, constraints and Lagrange multipliers, introduction to integral 
equations, and solutions in iterative and other methods. Prerequisites: MATH 431, 432. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 265 



MATH-665. Principles of Optimization Credit 3 (3-0) 

Algebra, linear inequalities, duality, graphs, transport networks; linear programming; special 
algorithms; selected applications. An upper level course. Prerequisites: MATH-231 or equiva- 
lent and MATH-450. 

MATH-675. Graph Theory Credit 3 (3-0) 

Varieties of graphs, graph theory algorithms, and applications of graph theory to other disci- 
plines. Prerequisite: MATH-450. 

MATH-691. Special Topics in Applied Mathematics Credit 3 (3-0) 

Topics are selected from differential equations, numerical methods, operations research, ap- 
plied mechanics and from other fields of applied mathematics. Prerequisites: Senior or graduate 
standing and consent of the instructor. Graduate Students Only 

MATH-700. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable I Credit 3 (3-0) 

The focus of this course is a careful study of the fundamental theorems of Lebesgue theory, 
including Lebesgue measure, differentiation and integration on the real line. Topics from set 
theory and point set topology are also included in this course. Prerequisite: MATH-507 or 
equivalent. 

MATH-701 . Theory of Functions of a Real Variable II Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a continuation of MATH-700. The following topics will be covered in this course: 
general measure and integration, measure and outer measure, and some basic topics from func- 
tional analysis. Prerequisite: MATH-700. 

MATH-705. Graduate Seminar Seminar 1 (0-2) 

The seminars will present current developments and ideas in applied mathematics and compu- 
tational science. Topics explored may consist of material from various mathematics and 
computational science journals, including discussion of research by faculty and students. This 
course may be repeated for up to 3 credits hours. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

MATH-706. Categorical Data Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will include the following topics: Two-Way Contingency Table Inference for Two- 
Way Table, Models for Binary Response Variables, Log-linear Models, Testing in Loglinear 
Models, Multinomial Response Models and Estimation Theory for Parametric Models, and 
Computer Analysis of Categorical Data. Prerequisite: MATH 624. 

MATH-708. Nonparametric Statistics Credit 3 (3-0) 

The following topics will be discussed in this course: Order Statistics, Run Test for Trend, 
Goodness of Fit Tests, Rank Tests for One and Two Populations, Linear Rank Statistics, One- 
Way and Two -Way Nonparametric Analysis of Variance, and applications to practical problems. 
Prerequisite: MATH 624. 

MATH-710. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable I Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course includes basic theory of analytic functions, including Cauchy's theorem, confor- 
mal mappings, Taylor and Laurent series, and residue theory. Prerequisite: MATH-507 or 
equivalent. 

MATH-711. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable II Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a continuation of MATH-710. Basic theory and applications of conformal map- 
pings, fractional linear, analytic continuation, and Riemann surfaces will be covered in this 
course. Prerequisite: MATH-710. 



266 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



MATH-712. Numerical Linear Algebra Credit 3 (3-0) 

'Numerical analysis for solution of linear systems, approximation methods foreign values and 
: eigenvectors, least squares solutions, ill-posed and ill-conditioned systems and error analysis 
are covered. Prerequisite: One programming language, MATH-450 or equivalent. 

: MATH-715. Projective Geometry Credit 3 (3-0) 

A study of non-Euclidean geometry dealing with ordinary points, ideal points, ordinary lines, 
ideal lines, ordinary planes and ideal planes. The course deals with perceptivities and 
projectivities, harmonic sets of points and lines, dualities and related items in a non-metric 
setting. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor. 

! MATH-717. Special Topics in Algebra Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers selected topics in algebra. Topics covered will be determined by the instruc- 
tor. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and graduate standing. 

MATH-720. Special Topics in Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers selected topics in analysis. Topics covered will be determined by the in- 
structor. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and graduate standing. 

MATH-721. Multivariate Statistical Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

Multivariate Normal Distribution, Inference About a Man Vector, Comparison of Several Mul- 
tivariate Means, Analysis of Covariance Structure, Analysis of Dispersion, Classification and 
Clustering Techniques and Some Applications of Multivariate Tests will be discussed in this 
course. Also, practical examples of industrial use will be addressed. Prerequisites: MATH 608 
and MATH 624. 

MATH-723. Advanced Topics in Applied Mathematics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is designed to cover important topics in applied mathematics that may be desired 
from time to time for specific students in the graduate program. It may also be used as a vehicle 
for development of new courses for graduate program students. Prerequisite: Consent of the 
instructor. 

MATH-725. Graduate Design Project Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course requires independent project work on an advanced mathematical topic of interest 
to the student and a faculty member acting as the student's advisor. The topic must be approved 
by the advisor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

MATH-730. Thesis Research in Mathematics Credit 3 (3-0) 

Students who select the thesis option must do advanced research in an area of interest. The 
research topic must be approved by the thesis advisor. 

MATH-731. Advanced Numerical Methods Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers numerical methods for solution of parabolic, elliptic and hyperbolic bound- 
ary value problems. Problems are selected from engineering applications. Both finite difference 
and finite element methods are studied. Prerequisite: MATH-460 or equivalent. 

MATH-733. Advanced Probability and Stochastic Processes Credit 3 (3-0) 

The following topics will be discussed in this course: introduction to Lebesgue integration, 
probability theory and random variables, laws of large numbers, central limit theorems, ran- 
dom walks, martingales, Markov processes and Markov chains, ergodic theorems and Brownian 
motion. Prerequisite: MATH 603 or permission of the instructor. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 267 



MATH-751. Solution Methods in Integral Equations Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course includes an introduction to integral equations, including Volterra equations, Fredholm 
equations, symmetric kernels, orthogonal systems of functions, and types of singular and non- 
linear integral equations. Applications to engineering areas are also discussed. Prerequisites: 
MATH-43 1 , MATH-432 or equivalent. 

MATH-752. Calculus of Variation and Control Theory Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers the following topics: Functionals, Euler's equation, Lagrange multipliers, 
Kuhn-Tucker conditions, Pontryagin maximum principle, Weiserstrass-Erdmann corner con- 
ditions, Euler-Legrange equations; first and second variational problems. Applications to 
engineering areas will also be included. Prerequisites: MATH-43 1 , MATH-432 or equivalent. 

MATH-765. Optimization Theory and Applications Credit 3 (3-0) 

Gradient methods for unconstrained optimization, constrained nonlinear optimization, optimi- 
zation of multi-steps, variational principles, and applications relating to business and engineering 
are discussed. Prerequisites: MATH-450, MATH-43 1JM ATH-432. 

MATH-781. Mathematical and Computational Modeling Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course explores the steps required to model and simulate a system, including discussion of 
generic governing equations, grid generation, basic numerical schemes, simulation strategies, 
and data analysis. Both discrete and continuous methods used in scientific applications will be 
examined. Representative applications include weather prediction, molecular dynamics, sched- 
uling problems, and engine combustion modeling. Prerequisite: MATH 480. 

MATH-782. Scientific Visualization Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course explores concepts and techniques for visualization and its implementation, with 
emphasis on the use of visualization tools in mathematical simulation modeling. The course 
will provide practical experience with visualization packages in both X-Windows and main- 
frame environments. Prerequisite: MATH 781 . 

MATH-791. Interdisciplinary Computational Science Team Project I Credit 3 (1-4) 
This course continues development of skills required for independent research of problem- 
solving in the realm of computational science. The courser requires completion of a sound 
literature review on a topic in computational science, under the guidance of the instructor. 
Prerequisite: MATH 480. 

MATH-792. Interdisciplinary Computational Science Team Project II Credit 3 (1-4) 
This course continues development of skills required for independent research or problem- 
solving in the realm of computational science. The course requires completion of an agreed 
upon computational project, based upon a sound literature review, under the guidance of the 
instructor. Prerequisite: MATH 791. 



268 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Manufacturing Systems 



http://www.ncat.edu/~sot/mfg/ 
Dr. Derrek B. Dunn, Interim Chairperson 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The School of Technology at North Carolina A&T State University offers a Master of 
Science in Industrial Technology (MSIT) degree. This program is coordinated by the Depart- 
ment of Manufacturing Systems and is designed to increase students' understanding of indus- 
trial management challenges in an array of technical areas and to explore effective methods for 
dealing with accelerated technological change. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Manufacturing Systems - Master of Science in Industrial Technology 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

The Master of Science in Industrial Technology, within the School of Technology, re- 
quires the GRE General Test as part of the admission process. No minimum score is required at 
this time. Please contact the Graduate School Office for more information. 

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 

The MSIT degree program is built upon the competencies achieved at the baccalaureate 
level in the industrial technology curriculum and thus enable students to secure applications 
oriented "technical-management" positions in today's industrial environment. Specifically, the 
MSIT program is designed to prepare technical-management professionals and enhance their 
proficiencies in the following areas: 

1 . Planning, organization and management of technology, people, and resources; 

2. Applying and controlling the use of various high technologies, e.g., computer-aided 
drafting and design (CADD), computer integrated manufacturing (CIM), machine 
vision and photonics, telecommunications and wireless communications, computer- 
ized construction estimating systems, safety support systems, etc. 

3. Control processes to improve quality, reliability and productivity 

4 . Human resource management and the development of a changing work place to achieve 
organizational goals; and 

5. Problem-solving and creative thinking skills. 

TARGET AUDIENCE AND CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

This program is designed to serve the diverse needs of persons who are interested in pur- 
suing careers in technology. Included in this group are the following: (1) persons currently 
employed in industrial management positions and have professional growth aspirations; (2) 
individuals recently completing their undergraduate study and want additional preparation prior 
to embarking on a career in industry; and (3) students interested in entering an advanced gradu- 
ate degree program (Ph.D., Ed.D., etc.) and whose ultimate goal is university teaching and/or 
research. Graduates of the program should be able to perform more creatively and competently 
in leadership roles involving planning, problem solving, and decision-making. Additionally, 
the program is designed to enhance student competencies in the areas of research and scholarly 
writing. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 269 



INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 

A total of 36 hours is required for the Master of Science in Industrial Technology with a 
concentration in Manufacturing Systems. The total consists of 12 SH of Core Courses, 6 SH 
of Management Electives, 9 SH of Technical Electives and 9 SH of Required Courses. 

PROGRAM CURRICULA 

Core Courses ( 1 2 credit hours) Credits 

MSIT610 Problem Solving in Industrial Technology 3 

MSIT 700 Concepts of Technological Innovations 3 

MSIT 740 Leadership Development Seminar 3 

MSIT 779 Statistical Research in Industrial Technology 3 

Management Course (6 credit hours) 

MSIT 673 Industrial Productivity Measurement & Analysis 3 

MFG 735 Manufacturing Organization and Management 3 

MFG 745 Managing Project Development 3 

MFG 755 Production Management and Control 3 

MFG 770 Managing a Total Quality System 3 

MFG 772 Strategic Concepts in Quality 3 

Technical Electives (9 credit hours) 

MFG 65 1 Principles of Robotics 3 

MFG 674 Advanced Automation and Control 3 

MFG 682 Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) Technology II 3 

MFG 690 Special Problems in Manufacturing Systems 3 

MFG 696 Applied Computer Integrated Manufacturing 3 

MFG 699 Independent Study in Manufacturing Technology 3 

MFG 710 Manufacturing Materials 3 

MFG 715 Tool Technology 3 

MFG 760 Advanced Manufacturing Process/CNC 3 

MFG 780 Reliability Testing and Analysis 3 

MFG 799 Special Topics in Manufacturing Technology 3 

Required Courses (9 credit hours) 
Select either Non-Thesis or Thesis Option 

Non-Thesis Option: 

MSIT 750 Internship I 3 

MSIT 751 Internship II 3 

MSIT 789 Master's Project 3 

or 

Thesis Option: 

MSIT 780 Statistical and Research Methods in Industrial Technology II 3 

MSIT 791 Research for Master's Thesis I 3 

MSIT 792 Research for Master's Thesis II 3 

Required Examination (0 credit hours) 

MFG 788 Master's Comprehensive Examination 



270 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



COURSES DESCRIPTION IN MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS (MFG, MSIT) 

Undergraduate/Graduate 

MSIT-610. Problem Solving in Industrial Technology Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course teaches the fundamentals of problem solving as they are applied to an industrial 
technology environment. Included are analytical as well as creative problem solving techniques. 
Industrial projects within assigned teams are required. 

MFG-651. Principles of Robotics Credit 3 (1-3) 

This course emphasizes the study of robotics principles and logic control manipulators towards 
the total integration into a flexible manufacturing system. 

MSIT-673. Industrial Productivity Measurement and Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

Study of work measurement and method analysis towards establishing work standards and 
measuring productivity in industries. 

MFG-674. Study of Automation and Control Systems Credit 3 (1-3) 

This course emphasizes the study of automation and control system to include application of 
PLC, CAD, CAM, CNC, sensors and robotics to simulate a total computer-integrated manu- 
facturing (CIM) environment. 

MFG-682. Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) Technology II Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course presents the newly developed and/or advanced NDE technologies, such as acoustic 
emission techniques, magnetic flux leakage techniques, radiographic techniques, thermal in- 
frared testing, microwave techniques, ultrasonic holography, and vibro-thermographic 
techniques. For each of these technologies, a series of topics will be discussed: physical prin- 
ciples, testing procedures, application areas, equipment, instruments, data acquisition, data 
analysis, flaw indication, advantages and limitations. 

MFG-690. Special Problems in Manufacturing Technology Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is to provide a forum for dialogue about areas of interest to students pertaining to 
issues and or skill development. This will be accomplished through the definition, exploration, 
and tentative resolution of selected current and evolving industrial technology. This experience 
is targeted toward providing students the opportunity to think about a particular concern and/or 
interest then to develop a final product in the form of paper and presentation. 

MFG-696. Applied Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course is designed to provide a working knowledge of computer integrated manufacturing 
(CIM). It will provide hands-on experience using sensoring devices necessary to control a CIM 
system. Prerequisite: MFG-674. 

MFG-699. Independent Study in Manufacturing Technology Credit 3 (3-0) 

The student selects a problem, either management or technical in nature, in consultation with a 
faculty member in this area of interest. This problem may be research or application oriented in 
nature. A standard report format will be required. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 

MFG-700. Concepts of Technological Innovations Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will provide instruction in the concepts of technological innovations. Contempo- 
rary issues are also explored. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 271 



MFG-710. Manufacturing Materials Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course surveys the materials commonly used to manufacture products. It explores the way 
these materials are formed. Covered are traditional metals and plastics as well as emerging 
high tech materials. The practical applications of these materials are emphasized. Prerequisite: 
MFG-471 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 

MFG-715. Tool Technology Credit 3 (2-1) 

Includes coverage of tool layout, tool material, tool wear and failure, work holding principles, 
jig and die, specifications for press working, blanking, bending, forming, drawing, and forg- 
ing, etc. Tooling for joining processes such as welding, soldering, brazing, mechanical joining, 
and adhesive bonding are covered, as well as the use of computers in tooling. Prerequisite: 
MFG-472 or equivalent or consent of instructor. 

MFG-735. Manufacturing Organization and Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course surveys contemporary manufacturing organization and management issues, focus- 
ing on manufacturing aspects of the product cycle, research and development, product design, 
marketing, sales and distribution. This course explores new trends in technology management 
and quality of work life issues. 

MSIT-740. Leadership Development Seminar Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is an experiential seminar designed for assessment of the individual's managerial strengths 
and weaknesses in a manufacturing management position. Current and evolving leadership 
issues will be discussed and leadership models will be presented. Managerial and leadership 
issues in high participation work places will be stressed. Students will participate in behavioral 
simulations and receive psychometric feedback. 

MFG-745. Managing New Product Development Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers the product development cycle and emphasizes the benefits of Early Manu- 
facturing Involvement (EMI) and Logistics Processes. Use of cross-functional teams in product 
development is also explored. 

MSIT-750. Internship I Credit 3 (0-6) 

This course is designed to provide students with an internship experience in an industrial envi- 
ronment related to their technical discipline. Students must be employed full-time for one 
semester. Evaluation will be based on reports from the student's industrial supervisor and the 
university coordinator. Prerequisite: 15 hours graduate credit. 

MSIT-751. Internship II Credit 3 (0-6) 

This course is designed to provide students with an additional semester of internship experi- 
ence related to their technical discipline. 

MFG-755. Production Management and Control Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focus is on production scheduling, work flow, and inventory flow, Just-in-time 
(JIT), and Material Resources Planning (MRP) are explored as techniques for structuring pro- 
duction as well as inventory management. Traditional work design is compared to newer, more 
high participative work designs including self-managed teams. 

MFG-760. Advanced Manufacturing Process/Computer Numerical 

Control (CNC) Credit 3 (1-2) 

This course explores applications in advanced Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) ma- 
chine tool technology with precision work performed on lathes, mill, Electrostatic Discharge 
Machining (EDM), and surface drilling work stations. Prerequisite: MFG-472 or consent of 
instructor 



272 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



I MFG-770. Managing a Total Quality System Credit 3 (3-0) 

The study of total quality control systems assists to reduce defects, lower costs, and increase 

productivity in a manufacturing environment. Study includes implementing quality through 

! ^Statistical Process Control (SPC), managing quality, quality information systems, quality circles, 

jjand quality work-life concepts. Prerequisite: MFG-495 or equivalent or consent of instructor 

I MFG 772. Strategic Concepts in Quality Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course has four parts. Part I, Introduction to Total Quality, presents the core principles of 
TQ and begins to explain how they relate to management concepts. This section also explains 
many of the mo9st comm9on quality techniques students are likely to encounter. Part II, Total 
Quality and Organization Theory, introduces the idea of customer-supplier relations and shows 
how TQ relates to topics including organization-environment relations, organizational design, 
sand change. Part III, Total Quality and Organizational Behavior will discuss the themes of 
' teamwork and empowerment and relates TQ on both the content and process of competitive 
strategy. The bibliography at the end of the textbook provides a number of references for the 
selection of the Quality Paper and Quality Presentation requirement of this course. 

MSIT 779. Statistical Research in Industrial Technology Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course introduces the concepts and methods of statistics, which include descriptive statis- 

' tics, probability theory, sampling distribution, interval estimation, hypothesis testing, statistical 
inferences, linear and multiple regressions, auto- and cross-correlation, and non-parametric 
statistical methods. The course also emphasizes the applications of the statistics to the research 

| and development in industrial technologies, which include research design, data collection and 

; analysis, proposal development and reports 

} MFG-780. Reliability Testing and Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

! Study of Metrology and reliability testing at various stages of manufacturing processes for zero 
I failures. Includes destructive and non-destructive testing procedures, failure analysis, expo- 
i nential and Weibull Failure Law, and reliability prediction of components and/or systems. 

MFG 788. Master's Comprehensive Exam Credit (0-1) 

This course will aid in the preparation of the graduate student to take the Master of Science in 
I Industrial Technology (MSIT) comprehensive examination. The examination will be adminis- 
i tered towards the end of the semester or summer session. This course will be graded on a Pass/ 
I Fail basis. The passing of this course is a requirement for graduation from the MSIT program. 
I Prerequisites: 24 credit hours of graduate level courses. (F;S;SS) 

MSIT-789. Master's Degree Project Credit 3 (3-0) 

The master's degree project is designed to be a culminating experience for the master's degree. 

It is applications oriented and focuses on an actual project related to the student's technical 
i discipline. The course is intended to integrate the learning from the classes taken in the degree 
I program. Prerequisite: 24 hours graduate credit. 

MSIT-790. Research Methods Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course explores empirical methodologies that are applicable to technical research investi- 
gation. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of thesis advisor. 

MSIT-791. Thesis I Credit 3 (3-0) 

The student will select a research topic that is of special interest and approved by his/her gradu- 
ate thesis advisor. Prerequisite: MSIT 790 or consent of advisor. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 273 



MSIT-792. Thesis II Credit 3 (3-0) 

The student may enroll in this course to complete approved research for the thesis. Prerequi- 
sites: MSIT 790, MSIT 791 or consent of advisor. 

MFG-799. Special Topics in Manufacturing Technology Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will allow a group of students to work on special topics of interest which are not 
covered by an existing course. These are emerging themes that reflect the rapidly changing 
nature of "World Class Manufacturing" environments. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 



274 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Mechanical Engineering 



Leonard C. Uitenham, Chairperson 

618 McNair Building 

(336) 334-7621 

OBJECTIVE 

The objective of graduate study in Mechanical Engineering is to provide advanced level 
study in mechanical engineering in four distinct areas of specialization. The Master of Science 
in Mechanical Engineering is designed to prepare the graduate for Ph.D. level studies or for 
advanced mechanical engineering practice in industrial consulting or government service. The 
Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering provides both advanced instruction and independent 
research opportunities to students. The Ph.D. degree is the highest academic degree offered, 
and graduates typically are employed in research environments in government laboratories and 
industries, and as university faculty. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (MSME) 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Mechanical Engineering 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



Program Description 

The Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering is a graduate-level program comprising 
advanced studies in mechanics and materials, energy and thermal/fluid systems, design and 
manufacturing, and aerospace. 

Admission to the MSME Program 

The Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering Program is open to students with a 
Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering or a closely related field from an institution of 
recognized standing. Application packages may be obtained from the School of Graduate Stud- 
ies Office, Room 122, Gibbs Hall, North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro, NC 
27411. Applicants may be admitted to the MSME Program under two categories: Uncondi- 
tional Admission or Conditional Admission. Details follow: 

1 . Unconditional Admission: An applicant may be given unconditional admission to the MSME 
Program if he/she possesses a MSME bachelor's degree from an ABET (Accreditation 
Board for Engineering and Technology) accredited institution, with an overall GPA of 3.0 
or better on a 4.0 scale. 

Students admitted on an unconditional basis are also expected to have completed 
"key courses" below as part of their prior undergraduate program. 
Undergraduate Courses Required: 
Calculus (minimum of 8 semester hours) Statics 

Differential Equations Dynamics 

Applied Engineering Mathematics Strength of Materials 

Physics (minimum of 6 semester hours) Materials Science 

Chemistry Thermodynamics 

Fortran Programming Fluid Mechanics 

Introductory Numerical Methods Mechanical Engineering Design 

Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 275 



Additional undergraduate course requirements for Specialization in Mechanics and 
Materials: three (3) credits of Advanced Materials 

Additional undergraduate course required for Specialization in Energy and Thermal/ 
Sciences: three (3) credits of Heat Transfer 

Additional undergraduate courses required for Specialization in Design and Manu- 
facturing: three (3) credits of System Dynamics and three (3) credits of Manufacturing 
Processes 

2. Provisional Admission: Applicants may be granted conditional admission if they do not 
qualify for unconditional admission due to one or more of the following reasons: 

a. Applicant has a baccalaureate mechanical engineering degree from a non-ABET ac 
credited program. Undergraduate engineering degrees from foreign universities fall 
into this category. 

b. Applicant has a baccalaureate degree in engineering but is deficient in key back 
ground courses listed in the previous section. These deficiencies must not exceed 12 
credit hours. 

c. Applicant has an undergraduate degree which is not in engineering but is in a closely 
related curriculum with a substantial engineering science content. Background defi- 
ciencies should not exceed 12 credit hours. 

d. Applicant's undergraduate grade point average is below that required for uncondi 
tional admission but there is also academic evidence that the student will successfully 
complete the degree. 
Provisional admission status will be changed to unconditional when the student has 

satisfied the two conditions below: 

a. All required course deficiencies have been completed with a 3.0 GPA or above and 

b. A minimum of 3.0 GPA is attained on A&T courses taken for graduate credit at the 
end of the semester in which the 9th semester credit is completed. 

Failure to move to unconditional admission when first eligible will result in the stu 
dent being subject to probation policies. Other admission conditions and program require 
ments may be imposed on a case-by-case basis as approved by the Dean of the School of 
Graduate Studies. 

Provisional admission status is the minimum level of graduate admission classifica- 
tion. In this classification, students are eligible to register for 700-level courses, provided 
such courses are approved by the academic advisor. 

Change of Admission Status 

It is the student's responsibility to apply to the department for a change in admission 
status. Students who fail to have their status upgraded run the risk of not receiving graduate 
credit for any completed graduate courses. Such students also run the risk of academic proba- 
tion and dismissal. 

Program Options 

1. Course Work Option 

This option consists of thirty-three (33) semester hours of course work. Successful 
completion of the comprehensive examination is a degree requirement. Approval must be 
obtained from the Graduate Program Coordinator to elect the course work option. A course 
work Option student must also take at least five courses from her/his specialization area or 
in a related area as specified by the academic advisor. A candidate who chooses the course 
work option must select a permanent advisor who will direct the course of study and who 
will plan the Final Comprehensive Examination. The advisor may also be part of the group 



276 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



of examiners who conduct the Final Comprehensive Examination. A candidate who se- 
lects this option does not have a formal advising committee. 

Comprehensive Examination (Course work Option) 

Candidates who elect the course work option must sit for a written comprehensive 
examination of six (6) hours duration, prepared as three independent two-hour examina- 
tions. A student must have completed at least twenty-one (21) hours of course work to be 
eligible to take the comprehensive examination. 

One week each semester, at least forty-five (45) days prior to the end of the semester, 
will be designated as Comprehensive Examination Week. All students wishing to take the 
examination must do so during this period. 

Applications to take the examination must be submitted by the academic advisor to 
the Graduate Program Coordinator at least thirty (30) days prior to the scheduled begin- 
ning date of the examination. The student must initiate this process by contacting his/her 
advisor with an examination request. 

The application should contain a description of the subject areas to be covered by the 
exam. In consultation with the academic advisor, the Graduate Coordinator assigns an 
appropriate group of examiners as well as a test time and date. The Graduate Program 
Coordinator will organize the examination to arrange for as much "common" testing as 
possible based on material relating to the student's course work. 

The candidate must achieve a satisfactory score in at least two (2) sessions of the 
examination. Acandidate who fails to achieve a satisfactory score at the first attempt may 
sit again in the next regularly scheduled Comprehensive Examination Week, generally in 
the following semester. A candidate who fails a second time must petition the Dean of the 
School of Graduate Studies for permission to sit again. An unfavorable decision will result 
in dismissal from the program. A third failure will always result in dismissal from the 
program. 

Project and Thesis Options 

The Project Option consists of thirty (30) semester hours of course work and three (3) 
hours of special project. It is intended for students with an interest in research or indepen- 
dent study but who do not wish to do a full Master's thesis. Project Option students must 
take three hours of MEEN-796 Master's Project. An oral examination project defense/ 
examination is required. 

The Thesis Option consists of twenty-four (24) semester hours of course work and six 
(6) hours of thesis. Thesis Option students must take six hours of MEEN-797 Mater's 
Thesis. An original research topic must be chosen in conjunction with the student's advi- 
sor culminating in the preparation of a scholarly thesis. An oral thesis defense/examina- 
tion is required. This option is intended for students with strong research interests who 
may desire to pursue further graduate studies towards a Ph.D. degree. 

THE DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Program Description 

The Ph.D. degree program in Mechanical Engineering provides both doctoral-level in- 
struction and independent research opportunities for students. The Ph.D. degree is the highest 
academic degree offered, and graduates typically are employed in research environments in 
government laboratories and industries, and as University faculty. 

The Ph.D. degree program is highly individualistic in nature, and the student is expected 
to make a significant contribution to the reservoir of human knowledge by investigating a 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 111 



significant topic within the domain of mechanical engineering. The Ph.D. student must rely 
heavily on the guidance of the academic advisor and on the academic committee in formulating 
a plan of work, in setting and meeting the degree goals, and in selecting a dissertation problem. 
The academic advisor serves to guide the student during the dissertation study phase of the 
program. 

For details concerning admission requirements, see Admission and Other Information else- 
where in this catalog. 

Ph.D. Program Policies and Requirements 

The doctorate symbolizes the ability of the recipient to undertake original research and 
scholarly work of the highest levels without supervision. The degree is therefore not granted 
simply upon completion of a stated amount of course work but rather upon demonstration by 
the student of a comprehensive knowledge and high attainment in scholarship in a specialized 
field of study. As a guide however, the student is expected generally to have completed at least 
twenty-four (24) course credits beyond the master's degree and a minimum of twelve (12) 
dissertation credits. The student must demonstrate both the attainment of scholarship and inde- 
pendent study in a specialized field of study by writing a dissertation reporting the results of an 
original investigation. The student must pass a series of comprehensive examinations in the 
field of specialization and related areas of knowledge and defend successfully the quality, meth- 
odology, findings, and significance of the dissertation. 

Advisory Committee and Plan of Graduate Work 

An advisory committee of at least four graduate faculty members, one of whom will be 
designated as chair, will be appointed by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies upon the 
recommendation of the Chairperson of the department. The committee, which must include at 
least one representative of the minor field, will, with the student, prepare a Plan of Graduate 
Study which must be approved by the department and the School of Graduate Studies. In addi- 
tion to the course work to be undertaken, the subject of the student's dissertation must appear 
on the plan; any subsequent changes in committee or subject or in the overall plan must be 
submitted for approval as with the original plan. 

The program of study must be unified, and all constituent parts must contribute to an 
organized program of study and research. Courses must be selected from groups embracing 
one principal subject of concentration, the major, and from a cognate field, the minor. Nor- 
mally, a student will select the minor work from a single discipline or field. If the advisory 
committee finds that the needs of the student will be best served by work in an interdisciplinary 
minor, it has the alternative of developing a special program in lieu of the usual minor. 

OTHER INFORMATION 

See "Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree" elsewhere in this catalog for 
information related to residence requirements, qualifying examination, preliminary examina- 
tion, comprehensive examination, final oral examination, admission to candidacy, and time 
limit. Students should also consult the department handbook for more details. 

THE DISSERTATION 

The doctoral dissertation presents the results of the student's original investigation in the 
field of major interest. It must be a contribution to knowledge, be adequately supported by data 
and be written in a manner consistent with the highest standards of scholarship. Publication is 
expected. 



278 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



The dissertation will be reviewed by all members of the advisory committee and must 
receive their approval prior to submission to the School of Graduate Studies. Three copies of 
the document signed by all members of the student's advisory committee must be submitted to 
ji the School of Graduate Studies by a specified deadline in the semester or summer session in 
which the degree is to be conferred. Prior to final approval, the dissertation will be reviewed by 
the School of Graduate Studies to ensure that the format conforms to its specifications. 

The University has a requirement that all doctoral dissertations be microfilmed by Univer- 
sity Microfilms International of Ann Arbor, Michigan, which includes publication of the ab- 
stract in Dissertation Abstracts International. The student is required to pay for the microfilming 
service. 

Mechanical Engineering Course Summary 

COURSE TITLE 

MEEN 602 Advanced Strength of Materials 

MEEN 604 Intermediate Dynamics 

MEEN 606 Mechanical Vibrations 

MEEN 608 Experimental Stress Analysis 

MEEN 610 Theory of Elasticity 

MEEN 613 Composite Materials 

MEEN 614 Mechanics of Engineering Modeling 

MEEN 618 Numerical Analysis for Engineers 

MEEN 626 Advanced Fluid Dynamics 

MEEN 642 Materials Joining 

MEEN 645 Aluminum Product Design and Manufacturing 

MEEN 646 Advanced Manufacturing Processes 

MEEN 647 Computer Integrated Mechanism Design 

MEEN 649 Design of Robot Manipulators 

MEEN 650 Mechanical Properties and Structure of Solids 

MEEN 65 1 Aero Vehicle Structures II 

MEEN 652 Aero Vehicle Stability and Control 

MEEN 653 Aero Vehicle Flight Dynamics 

MEEN 654 Advanced Propulsion 

MEEN 655 Computational Fluid Dynamics 

MEEN 656 Boundary Layer Theory 

MEEN 657 Design of Thermal Systems 

MEEN 660 Selected Topics in Engineering 

MEEN 663 Energy Conversion Systems Design 

MEEN 667 Environmental Control 

MEEN 668 Gas Dynamics 

MEEN 670 Internal Combustion Engines 

MEEN 67 1 Turbo machinery 

MEEN 675 Solar Energy Fundamentals and Design 

MEEN 702 Continuum Mechanics 

MEEN 706 Theory of Vibrations 

MEEN 707 Real Time Analysis of Dynamic Systems 

MEEN 7 1 6 Finite Element Methods 

MEEN 719 Advanced Computer Aided Design 

MEEN 73 1 Conduction Heat Transfer 

MEEN 732 Convection Heat Transfer 

MEEN 733 Radiation Heat Transfer 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



279 



MEEN 742 Tools, Jigs, and Fixtures 

MEEN 743 Instrumentation 

MEEN 785 Special Topics 

MEEN 792 Master's Seminar 

MEEN 796 Master's Project 

MEEN 793 Master's Supervised Teaching 

MEEN 794 Master's Supervised Research 

MEEN 797 Master's Thesis 

MEEN 804 Advanced Dynamics 

MEEN 808 Energy Methods in Applied Mechanics 

MEEN 810 Advanced Theory of Elasticity 

MEEN 813 Composite Structures 

MEEN 814 Mathematical Theory of Plasticity 

MEEN 820 Advanced Classical Thermodynamics 

MEEN 822 Statistical Thermodynamics 

MEEN 824 Irreversible Thermodynamics 

MEEN 834 Special Topics in Applied Heat Transfer 

MEEN 838 Solar Thermal Energy Systems 

MEEN 840 Machine Tool Design 

MEEN 846 Stochastic Modeling of Mechanical Systems 

MEEN 847 Computational Engineering Dynamics 

MEEN 848 Digital Control of Machines and Processes 

MEEN 849 Computer Control of Robot Manipulators 

MEEN 850 Phase Equilibria 

MEEN 858 Mechanical Metallurgy 

MEEN 860 Fracture Mechanics 

MEEN 885 Special Topics 

MEEN 992 Doctoral Seminar 

MEEN 993 Doctoral Supervised Teaching 

MEEN 994 Doctoral Supervised Research 

MEEN 995 Doctoral Preliminary Examination 

MEEN 997 Doctoral Dissertation 

MEEN 999 Continuation of Thesis/Dissertation for Mechanical Engineering 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

MEEN-602. Advanced Strength of Materials Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers stress-strain relations as applied to statically indeterminate structures, bending 
in curved bars, plates, shells, and beams on elastic foundations. Topics include: strain energy 
concepts for formulation of flexibility matrix on finite elements, bending in beams and plates, 
Cartesian tensor notation, and matrix structural analysis. Prerequisites: MEEN 336, MATH 
432 or equivalent. 

MEEN-604. Intermediate Dynamics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course reviews particle and system dynamics, and introduces rigid body dynamics with 
solution techniques for the non-linear systems of ordinary differential equations as initial value 
problems. Other topics covered include: angular and linear momentum, energy and Langrangian 
methods of body problems, generalized variables, small vibrations, and gyroscopic effects and 
stability. Prerequisites: MEEN 337, MATH 432 or equivalent. 



280 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



MEEN606. Mechanical Vibrations Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is a course in modeling, analysis and simulation of free and forced vibrations of damped 
and undamped, single and multi-degree of freedom systems. Prerequisites: MEEN 440 and 
MATH 431. 

MEEN-608. Experimental Stress Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 

Principles and methods of experimental stress analysis are covered in this course. Photo-elastic 
and micromeasurement techniques applied to structural models are also addressed. Prerequi- 
sites: AREN 457 or MEEN 602 or equivalent. 

MEEN-610. Theory of Elasticity Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course introduces stress, strain-strain relations, energy principles, and other related top- 
ics. Prerequisites: MATH 432, MEEN 336 or equivalent. 

MEEN-613. Composite Materials Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course introduces the processing of fiber-reinforced composite materials, anisotropic theory, 
and test methods for composites. Topics include different methods of processing polymeric 
composites, process control parameters, anisotropic constitutive equations, classes of anisot- 
ropy and associated elastic constants, micromechanics models, theories of failure, test methods, 
classical laminate theory, and special types of laminates. The concepts are applied to the design 
of simple composite structural components. This course includes a laboratory component for 
students to learn processing and testing of composite materials. Prerequisites: MEEN 260 and 
MEEN 336 or their equivalents. 

MEEN-614. Mechanics of Engineering Modeling Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is a course in engineering modeling techniques including time dependent integration simu- 
lation models of systems, and finite difference and finite element methods in mechanics. 
Prerequisites: MEEN 210, MEEN 336, MATH 432 or equivalent. 

MEEN-618. Numerical Analysis for Engineers Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a study of scientific programming, error analysis, matrix algebra, eigenvalue 
problems, curve-fitting approximations, interpolation, numerical differentiation and integra- 
tion, solutions to simultaneous equations, and numerical solutions of differential equations. 
Prerequisite: MEEN 210 or equivalent. 

MEEN-626. Advanced Fluid Dynamics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course presents an overview of Navier-Stokes Equations, continuity equation, energy equa- 
tion, inviscid flow, potential theory, complex potentials, and conformal mapping. Prerequisite: 
MEEN 416 or equivalent. 

MEEN-642. Materials Joining Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers theories and applications of joining of metals, ceramics, and plastics by the 
standard industrial techniques: arc, gas, electron beam, laser, ultrasonic, and diffusion bond- 
ing. Additional topics covered include: phase diagrams, diffusion equations, and physical/ 
chemical properties in joining considerations. Prerequisites: MEEN 446 and MATH 432 or 
equivalent. 

MEEN-645. Aluminum Product Design and Manufacturing Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course introduces students to the principles of product and manufacturing process design 
specifically applicable to aluminum-based materials. Material properties of aluminum are com- 
pared with those of other commercial materials. Raw material fabrication and product 
manufacturing processes are presented. The interactions between processes and material prop- 






Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 28 1 



erties are described. Case studies are presented to guide the student in successful completion of 
design projects. Prerequisites: MEEN 260 and MEEN 474. 

MEEN-646. Advanced Manufacturing Processes Credit 3 (3-0) 

Theory, application, and design considerations for forming and machining are covered in this 
course. Additional topics covered include: machines and tooling in modern manufacturing pro- 
cesses, dimensional and tolerance analysis, and control of work piece and tool. Design projects 
of molds, dies, presses, jigs and fixtures or automated machinery are required. Prerequisites: 
MEEN 446, MEEN 474, MATH 23 1 , or equivalent. 

MEEN-647. Computer Integrated Mechanism Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is a course in modern computer simulation tools and the underlying theories for synthesis 
and analysis of mechanical systems consisting of linkages, cams, and gears. Prerequisite: MEEN 

440. 

MEEN-648. Computer Controlled Manufacturing Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course introduces students to computer integrated manufacturing, numerical control and 
group technology. Topics include: manufacturing process interfacing, discrete process model- 
ing, analysis and control techniques and algorithms, characteristics and software of control 
computers, sensors for computer control, programmable controllers, and sequential control. 
Prerequisites: MEEN 446, MATH 331, or consent of the instructor. 

MEEN-649. Design of Robot Manipulators Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers fundamentals of kinematics, dynamics, computer graphics, sensing devices, 
measurements and control in robot manipulators. Prerequisites: MEEN 440 or equivalent. 

MEEN-650. Mechanical Properties and Structure of Solids Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course examines the elastic and plastic behavior of matter in relation to its structure, both 
macroscopic and microscopic. Major representative classes of materials to be examined are 
thermoplastic materials, elastomers, glasses, ceramics, metals, and composites. Prerequisite: 
MEEN 460 or equivalent. 

MEEN-651. Aero Vehicle Structures II Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers deflection of structures, indeterminate structures, fatigue analysis, and mini- 
mum weight design. Finite element methods and software are utilized. Prerequisite: MEEN 422. 

MEEN-652. Aero Vehicle Stability and Control Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers longitudinal, directional, and lateral static stability and control of aerospace 
vehicles. It also covers linearized dynamics analysis of the motion of a six degree-of- freedom 
flight vehicle in response to control inputs and disturbance through the use of the transfer func- 
tion concept, plus control of static and dynamics behavior by vehicle design (stability derivatives) 
and/or flight control systems. Prerequisites: MEEN 415, MEEN 422, and ELEN 410. 

MEEN-653. Aero Vehicle Flight Dynamics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers the basic dynamics of aerospace flight vehicles including orbital mechan- 
ics, interplanetary and ballistic trajectories, powered flight maneuvers and spacecraft 
stabilization. Prerequisites: MATH 432, MEEN 337, and MEEN 422. 

MEEN-654. Advanced Propulsion Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a second course in propulsion. It covers the analysis and design of individual 
components and complete air-breathing propulsion systems including turbo fans, turbo jets, 
ramjets, and chemical rockets. Prerequisite: MEEN 576. 



282 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



I MEEN-655. Computational Fluid Dynamics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides an introduction to numerical methods for solving the exact equations of 
I fluid dynamics. Finite difference methods are emphasized as applied to viscous and inviscid 
'([ flows over bodies. Students are introduced to a modern computational fluid dynamics com- 
puter code. Prerequisites: MATH 432 and MEEN 415 or MEEN 416. 



t MEEN-656. Boundary Layer Theory Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers the fundamental laws governing flow of viscous fluids over solid bound- 
aries. Exact and approximate solutions are studied for various cases of boundary layer flow 
t including laminar, transitional and turbulent flow. Prerequisite: MEEN 415 or 416. 

I 

| MEEN-657. Design of Thermal Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

; This is a course in the selection of components for fluid and energy processing systems to meet 
system performance requirements. Computer-aided thermal design, simulation and optimiza- 

I tion techniques, and investment economics are discussed. Design projects are assigned to 

I demonstrate application of these topics. Prerequisites: MEEN 562 and INEN 260. 

f 
MEEN-660. Selected Topics in Engineering Credit 3 (3-0) 

I This course consists of selected mechanical engineering topics of interest to students and fac- 

i ulty. The topics will be selected before the beginning of the course and will be pertinent to the 

programs of the students enrolled. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

I MEEN-663. Energy Conversion Systems Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers the design of steam power systems, internal combustion power systems, 
i refrigeration and heat pump systems, and an overview of direct energy conversion devices. 
] Power system design projects are assigned. Prerequisites: MEEN 416 and MEEN 442. 
I 
,1 MEEN-667. Environmental Control Credit 3 (3-0) 

, This course deals with the principles of heating and air conditioning and their applications to 

design of environmental control systems and determination of building heating and cooling 

I loads. Principal equipment, layout and control are discussed for various types of systems. Pre- 

j requisites: MEEN 442 and MEEN 562. 

( 
MEEN-668. Gas Dynamics Credit 3 (3-0) 

The course covers the principles of one-dimensional compressible fluid flow, normal shocks, 

and flow with friction, heating, and cooling. Two-dimensional flows are also introduced. Pre- 

I. requisites: MEEN 415 or MEEN 416 and MEEN 441 . 

J MEEN-670. Internal Combustion Engines Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course deals with the fundamental principles of spark-ignition and compression ignition 

ji engines, combustion phenomena, the effect of fuel-air mixture, design of components of an 

i internal combustion engine, and testing and performance curves. Design projects are assigned. 

I Prerequisite: MEEN 442. 

I 

i MEEN-671. Turbomachinery Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers the application of the cascade method to turbomachines, impulse and reac- 

i tion turbines, compressible fluid dynamics, gas turbine principles, pumps, compressors and 
blowers, and the design of turbine elements. Project work is assigned. Prerequisites: MEEN 

I- 415 or MEEN 416 and MEEN 442. 

MEEN-675. Solar Energy Fundamentals and Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course deals with the characterization of solar radiation at the earth's surface. Solar col- 
lectors of both flat and concentrating types, and storage and distribution systems are discussed 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 283 



and analyzed. System sizing, design and economic analysis for space heating, water heating 
and industrial process are covered. Prerequisite: MEEN 562. 

MEEN-702. Continuum Mechanics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers the applications of the laws of mechanics and thermodynamics to the con- 
tinuum. Topics include a rigorous development of the general equations applied to a continuum 
and the application and reduction of the general equations for specific cases of both solids and 
fluids. Prerequisite: MEEN 336 or equivalent. 

MEEN-706. Theory of Vibrations Credit 3 (3-0) 

Vibration analysis of systems with one-, two- or multi-degrees of freedom are introduced in 
this course. Topics include instrumentation, continuous systems, and computer techniques. Pre- 
requisites: MEEN 440, MATH 432, and MEEN 606. 

MEEN-707. Real Time Analysis of Dynamic Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers the theory and application of real time analysis (RTA) used in system iden- 
tification and machinery fault detection. RTAapplications in production engineering and product 
development are addressed to study short-lived events or to analyze system operation in time 
domain or frequency domain to identify system characteristics or possible problems. Prerequi- 
site: Consent of instructor. 

MEEN-716. Finite Element Methods Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers fundamental concepts of the finite element method for linear stress and 
deformation analysis of mechanical components. Topics include the development of truss, beam, 
frame, plane stress, plane strain, axisymmetric isoparametric, solid, thermal, and fluid ele- 
ments. ANSYS and NASTRAN software will be used for solving practical stress analysis 
problems. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

MEEN-719. Advanced Computer-Aided Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers important methods and techniques for using the computer to aid the design 
process. Simulation and optimization methods are applied to the design of mechanical sys- 
tems. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

MEEN-731. Conduction Heat Transfer Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course presents the development of the general heat conduction equation and its applica- 
tions to one-, two-, and three-dimensional steady and unsteady boundary value problems. Closed 
form and numerical solution techniques are addressed. Prerequisite: MEEN 562 or equivalent. 

MEEN-732. Convection Heat Transfer Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course presents the analysis of heat convection in laminar and turbulent boundary layer 
and pipe flow. Topics include: dimensional analysis, free convection, condensation, and boil- 
ing. Prerequisite: MEEN 562 or equivalent. 

MEEN-733. Radiation Heat Transfer Credit 3 (3-0) 

A comprehensive treatment of basic theories is reviewed in this course. Topics include: radia- 
tion characteristics of surfaces, radiation properties taking account of wave length and direction, 
and analysis of radiation exchange between idealized and real surfaces. The course also ad- 
dresses fundamentals of radiation transfer in absorbing, emitting, and scattering media. The 
interaction of radiation with conduction and convection is discussed. Prerequisite: MEEN 562 
or equivalent. 

MEEN-742. Tools, Jigs, and Fixtures Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers tool design methods, tool-making practices, tool materials and heat treat- 
ments, and plastics for tool materials. Additional topics covered include: design of cutting tools 

284 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



i for N/C machine tools , design of size and fixture , basics of clamping , and chucking and indexing 
for various machining processes. Prerequisites: MEEN 460, MATH 432 or equivalent. 

(i MEEN-743. Instrumentation Credit 3 (3-0) 

- Principles and practices of industrial measurement are presented in this course. Topics include: 
i instrument dynamics and response characteristics; theory of transducers for temperature, pres- 
i sure, flow, motion, force; and other physical phenomena. Special topics in instrumentation, 

data acquisition and data reduction are covered. A project is assigned in an instrumentation 

application. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. 

i MEEN-785. Special Topics Credit 3 (3-0) 

-! This course is designed to allow the introduction of potential new courses on a trial basis or 
special content courses on a once only basis at the Master's level. The topic of the course and 

title are determined prior to registration. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

i 

MEEN-792. Master's Seminar Credit 1 (1-0) 

i This course provides a forum for discussions and reports of subjects in mechanical engineering 
\i and allied fields. Prerequisite: Master's level standing. 

MEEN-793. Master's Supervised Teaching Credit 3 (3-0) 

Students will gain teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student 
I in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during 
t the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment. Prereq- 
uisite: Master's level standing. 

) MEEN-794. Master's Supervised Research Credit 3 (3-0) 

I This course is supervised research under the mentorship of a faculty member. It is not intended 
to serve as the project nor thesis topic of the master's student. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

J MEEN-796. Master's Project Credit 3 (3-0) 

The student will conduct advanced research of interest to the student and the instructor. A 
written proposal, which outlines the nature of the project must be submitted for approval. This 
course is only available to project option students. Prerequisite: Master's level standing. 

MEEN-797. Master's Thesis Credit 3 (3-0) 

i Master of Science thesis research will be conducted under the supervision of the thesis com- 
mittee chairperson leading to the completion of the Master's thesis. This course is only available 
to thesis option students. Prerequisite: Consent of advisor. 

I MEEN-804. Advanced Dynamics Credit 3 (3-0) 

i This course covers Lagrange's equations of motion as applied to rigid body dynamics. Topics 
include: generalized coordinates, generalized conservative and dissipative forces, degrees of 
freedom, holonomic constraints as related to rigid body motion, calculus of variations, and 

I I Hamilton's equations of motion. Prerequisite: MEEN 604 or equivalent. 

! MEEN-808. Energy Methods in Applied Mechanics Credit 3 (3-0) 

1 The use of energy methods in solving applied mechanics problems is presented in this course. 
. Applications in beams and frames, deformable bodies, plates and shells, and buckling are ad- 
dressed. Variational methods are also discussed. Prerequisite: MEEN 610 or equivalent. 

MEEN-810. Advanced Theory of Elasticity Credit 3 (3-0) 

I This is a course in strains, stresses, and the equations of elasticity. Topics include general 
formulation of the 2-D boundary value problems and the formulation of certain three-dimen- 
sional problems with symmetry. Prerequisite: MEEN 610 or equivalent. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 285 



MEEN-813. Composite Structures Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on the application of composite materials to the design and analysis of) 
structures. The topics covered are two- and three-dimensional hydrothermal anisotropic elastic 
constitutive equations; classical laminate theory; static stress, vibration, and buckling analysis 
of laminated beams and plates; environmental effects; and fatigue and fracture of laminated 
composites. Prerequisite: MEEN 613 or equivalent. 

MEEN-814. Mathematical Theory of Plasticity Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers stress and strain tensors, transformations and equilibrium, and elastic be- 
havior. Topics include: theories of strength, plastic stress/strain, classical problems of plasticity, 
including thick- walled pressure vessels and rotating cylinders in elastic-plastic conditions, and 
slip line theory with applications. Prerequisite: MEEN 610 or equivalent. 

MEEN-820. Advanced Classical Thermodynamics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course covers conditions of equilibrium, processes and thermodynamic systems, first and 
second order phase transitions, and Nernst Postulate. Prerequisite: MEEN 442 or equivalent. 

MEEN 822. Statistical Thermodynamics Credit 3 (3-0) 

Statistical mechanics and macroscopic properties from statistical methods are presented in this 
course. Topics include: equilibrium information, generalized coordinates, and general vari-j 
ables. Prerequisite: MEEN 442 or equivalent. 

MEEN-824. Irreversible Thermodynamics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is a study of processes which are inherently entropy producing. Topics include: 
development of general equations for the theory of minimum rate of entropy production, me- 
chanical processes, life processes, and astronomical processes. Prerequisite: MEEN 820 or; 
equivalent. 

MEEN-834. Special Topics in Applied Heat Transfer Credit 3 (3-0) 

Selected special topics in applied heat transfer are presented in this course. Topics include: heat 
exchanger design and performance, cooling of electronic equipment, and advanced thermal 
insulation systems. Prerequisite: MEEN 562 or equivalent. 

MEEN-838. Solar Thermal Energy Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

Characteristic of extraterrestrial and terrestrial solar radiation transfer are presented in this i 
course. Topics include: analysis of thermal performance of concentrating and non-concentrat- i 
ing solar collectors, thermal energy storage systems and energy transport systems, and life] 
cycle cost analysis of solar energy systems. Computer simulation software is introduced. Pre- 
requisites: MEEN 731 and MEEN 732 or equivalent. 

MEEN-840. Machine Tool Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course presents general features and requirements of machine tools and design principles. 
Topics include: static and dynamic stiffness and rigidity, cutting forces, machine tool vibra- 
tions, stability against chatter, damping and dampers, transmission of motion, and standardization 
of speed change gears. This course will cover the design of constructional elements: bearings, j 
electrical components, pneumatics, hydraulics, material selection, and main spindle layouts. 
Prerequisites: MEEN 565 and MEEN 646 or equivalent. 

MEEN-846. Stochastic Modeling of Mechanical Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course introduces an engineering approach to the analysis of time series and discrete 
linear transfer function models. Applications include the analysis of experimental data for sys- 
tem modeling, identification, forecasting, and control. Prerequisite: Consent of advisor. 



286 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



(i MEEN-847. Computational Engineering Dynamics Credit 3 (3-0) 

1 This course introduces computer-oriented methods for the analysis and design of engineering 
p dynamic systems. Topics include: analytical and experimental techniques for model develop- 
f ment, design refinement of components in flexible dynamics systems (machine tools, robots, 
i moving vehicles, etc), and optimization techniques for transient response analysis on both con- 
strained and unconstrained systems. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

(I MEEN-848. Digital Control of Machines and Processes Credit 3 (3-0) 

-This course covers control algorithms and design of discrete controllers. Interfaces and com- 
mand generation for machines and process control are treated. Applications in numerically 
^controlled machines and industrial robots are covered. Prerequisite: MEEN 648. 

MEEN-849. Computer Control of Robot Manipulators Credit 3 (3-0) 

(i This course covers basic and adaptive robot control systems, sensory requirements and capa- 
t bilities, and robotic system diagnosis and applications. Prerequisite: MEEN 649 or Consent of 

instructor. 

(IMEEN-850. Phase Equilibria Credit 3 (3-0) 

'-This course presents interpretation and mathematical analysis of unary, binary and ternary, 

• inorganic , phase equilibria systems with examples for solving practical materials science prob- 
lems. Topics include: isoplethal and isothermal sections, crystallization paths, and 
thermodynamic fundamentals. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

MEEN-858. Mechanical Metallurgy Credit 3 (3-0) 

• This course covers continuum mechanics and the microscopic basis of plastic behavior. Em- 
iphasis is on the development and use of dislocation theory. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

MEEN-860. Fracture Mechanics Credit 3 (3-0) 

(This course introduces the student to the concept of stress and strain singularities and their 
'effect on fracture strength and fatigue life of isotropic and anisotropic materials. Topics cov- 
ered include: computation of the stress-strain field around a crack-tip, stress-intensity-factor, 
-strain energy release rate, J-integral, fracture toughness, residual strength, and fatigue crack 
propagation life. The course concepts are applied to the design of damage tolerant structures. 
'Prerequisite: MEEN-460 or equivalent. 

MEEN-885. Special Topics Credit 3 (3-0) 

p This course is designed to allow the introduction of potential new courses on a trial basis or 
ispecial content courses on a once only basis at the doctorate level. The topic of the course and 
i title are determined prior to registration. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

(MEEN-992. Doctoral Seminar Credit 1 (1-0) 

■4 In this course, doctoral students attend colloquia or seminars. They consist of presentations by 
■doctoral students on dissertation topics and works-in-progress and by guests on important clas- 
sical, contemporary, or research problems in mechanical engineering. Prerequisite: Doctoral 
elevel standing. 

MEEN-993. Doctoral Supervised Teaching Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is designed to introduce the doctoral student to classroom or laboratory teaching 
I under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Doctoral students who serve as teaching assistants or 
-as instructors are required to take this course during the first semester they teach. Others plan- 
- ning to undertake a teaching career are also strongly encouraged to take it. Topics covered 

include: course planning, classroom teaching, lecture preparation, student evaluation, and grad- 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 287 



ing. The supervisor(s) will observe and provide feedback to the student and evaluate the student's] 
performance. Prerequisite: Doctoral level standing. 

MEEN-994. Doctoral Supervised Research Credit 3 (3-0)4 

This is supervised research under the mentorship of a member of the graduate faculty. It is not 
intended to serve as the dissertation topic of the doctoral student. Prerequisite: Consent of J 
instructor. 

MEEN-995. Doctoral Preliminary Examination Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is required of students who have completed the qualifier examination and who are takingj 
the preliminary examination during the semester. This is a supervised program to help prepare! 
the student for the preliminary examination under the mentorship of the academic advisor.j 
Prerequisite: Doctoral level standing. 

MEEN-997. Doctoral Dissertation Credit 3 (3-0) 

This supervised research serves as the dissertation of the doctoral student. Twelve credits of] 
dissertation are required for graduation. Prerequisites: Doctoral standing and consent of advisor.j 

MEEN-999. Continuation of Thesis/Dissertation for Mechanical 

Engineering Credit 1 (1-0)1 

The course is for master's and doctoral students who have completed all required credit hour! 
requirements. Prerequisite: Completion of all Thesis/Dissertation Credits. 



288 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Natural Resources and Environmental Design 



G. B. Reddy, Chairman 

238 Carver Hall 

(336) 334-7543 

reddyg@ncat.edu 

OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Design offers a program lead- 
ing to the Master of Science Degree in Plant, Soil and Environmental Science. Students may 
select any concentration in Applied Environmental Biology, Land Use and Management, Soil 
and Sustainable Fertility, Applied Environmental Chemistry, Soil Mineralogy, Soil and Water 
Conservation, Environmental Horticulture, Plant Biotechnology, Constructed Wetlands, and 
Mushroom Biology. The objective of the program is to prepare students with the expertise 
needed to assume technical, teaching, research, and extension positions in universities, indus- 
tries, and state/federal governments. 

Master of Science - DEGREE OFFERED 

1 Master of Science - Plant, Soil and Environmental Science 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The admission of students to the graduate degree program in the Department of Natural 
Resources and Environmental Design is concurrent with the general admission requirements 
of the University. For other requirements refer to the graduate catalog. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Candidate should have a Baccalaureate degree from an accredited undergraduate institu- 
tion. A bachelor's degree in Agriculture is not required if the student has had adequate training 
in the basic sciences. The candidate should have a grade point average of 3.0 either in science 
and mathematics courses, or an overall undergraduate GPA of at least 2.6 (on a 4.0 scale). 
Additionally, the candidates should have the following required courses and credits or their 
equivalent. 

Chemistry 12 credit hours 

Biology 12 credit hours 

Mathematics and Calculus 6 credit hours 

Physics 3 credit hours 

Soil Science 3 credit hours 

Plant Science 3 credit hours 

Students who have not completed the required or equivalent courses at the undergraduate 
level, but have satisfied all other requirements for admission will be granted provisional or 
conditional admission and allowed to make up the deficiencies in the first two semesters. The 
students lacking adequate background in soil science, plant science or environmental science 
should take 6 credits in the deficient concentration. 

Thesis Option 

This option consists of a minimum of 30 semester hours at the 600 and 700 levels and 
completion of a thesis. A student receives 6 semester hours credit for thesis. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 289 



Non-thesis Option 

This option consists of a minimum of 33 semester hours at 600 and 700 levels , and comple- 
tion of a project report. 

The student pursuing the Master of Science degree in Plant, Soil and Environmental Sci- 
ence is required to complete a common core of courses consisting of 10 hours of the following 
courses: A student must take courses marked with asterisk (*). 

*HORT 700 Plant Biotechniques (Plant Science Option) 3(1-4) 

*SLSC 632 Soil Physics (Soil Science Option) 3 Semester Hours 

*AGRI 604 Experiment Methods in Research 3 Semester Hours 

*SLSC 717 Methodology in Soil, Plant, and Water Analysis 3 Semester Hours 

*NARS 720 Graduate Seminar in Natural Resources 1 Semester Hour 

Students pursuing the M.S . in Plant, Soil and Environmental Science are required to spend 
a minimum of two years to complete course work and a problem in applied research. In addi- 
tion, a minimum of 16 semester hours is required by area of concentration. 



Courses offered in Plant, Soil and Environmental Science - M.S. 

Courses 

AGEN 600 Soil and Water Engineering I 

AGEN 624 Water Resources Engineering 

AGEN 701 Soil and Water Design 

AGEN 714 Applied Hydrogeology 

AGRI 604 Experiment Methods in Research 

AGRI 799 Thesis Research in Agriculture and Environmental Science 

AGRI 999 Continuation of Thesis 

EASC 622 Environmental Sanitation and Waste Management 

EASC 624 Earth Science, Geomorphology 

EASC 625 Earth Resources 

EASC 644 Problem Solving in Earth Science 

EASC 666 Earth System Science 

EASC 699 Environmental Problems 

EASC 708 Conservation of Natural Resources 

EASC 718 Applied Environmental Microbiology 

HORT 600 Plant Tissue Culture 

HORT 611 Commercial Greenhouse Production 

HORT 620 Vegetable Production 

HORT 700 Plant Biotechniques 

NARS 608 Special Problems in Natural Resources 

NARS 610 Applied Spatial Statistics and GIS 

NARS 618 General Forestry and Ecology 

NARS 720 Graduate Seminar in Natural Resources 

NARS 777 Special Problems in Plant Sciences Graduate Studies 

SLSC 621 Soil Microbiology 

SLSC 632 Soil Physics 

SLSC 633 Soil Genesis, Classification and Land Use 

SLSC 634 Soil Environmental Chemistry 

SLSC 640 Wetland Management 

SLSC 7 1 Soils of North Carolina 

SLSC 715 Soil Mineralogy 

SLSC 717 Methodology in Soil, Plant and Water Analysis 

SLSC 727 Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition 

SLSC 734 Applied Environmental Chemistry 



Program 
Credits 



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3 


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3 


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3 


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3 


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3 


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3 


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3 


[2-2) 


3 


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3 


[2-2) 


3 


[1-4) 


3 


[3-0) 


3 


[2-2) 


3 


[2-2) 


1 


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3( 


[3-0) 


4 


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31 


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3( 


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3< 


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31 


3-0) 


3( 


0-6) 


3( 


3-0) 


4( 


4-0) 



290 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



COURSES WITH DESCRIPTION IN 
NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 

Plant, Soil and Environmental Science 
Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

AGEN-600. Soil and Water Engineering I Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course will illustrate measures to improve soil and water use by evaluating and using 
present conservation practices and models. Water conveying and retaining structures, and soil 
conservation, drainage and irrigation systems will be discussed and designed. The course will 
emphasize sound environmental design practices. Prerequisite: AGEN 360 or Consent of in- 
structor. (F) 

AGEN-624. Water Resources Engineering Credit 3 (2-2) 

Analysis and design of water resources systems. Topics include: water resources planning, and 
development, hydraulic structures, introduction to aquifer analysis and contamination, well 
development, pump evaluation and selection, water quality and management, water laws, de- 
tention and retention ponds, wastewater management and remediation. 

AGRI-604. Experiment Methods in Research Credit 3 (3-0) 

Experimental design, methods and techniques of experimentation, application of experimental 
design to plant, animal and food research; and interpretation of experimental data will be in- 
cluded in the course. Prerequisite (Math 224) 

EASC-622. Environmental Sanitation and Waste Management Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course is the study of traditional and innovative patterns as well as problems of managing 
with handling waste products of urban and rural environments, their renovation and reclama- 
tion. (F) 

EASC-624. Earth Science, Geomorphology Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course examines various land forms and their evolution - the naturally evolved surface 
features of the Earth's crust and the processes responsible for their evolution, their relation to 
man's activities and as the foundation for understanding the environment. (F) 

EASC-625. Earth Resources Credit 3 (2-2) 

Conservation, management and use of renewable and nonrenewable resources and their impact 
on the social and economic quality of our environment. (F) 

EASC-644. Problem Solving in Earth Science Credit 3 (3-0) 

Independent field and/or laboratory research in earth and environment science for advanced 
students is/or required. (S) 

EASC-666. Earth System Science Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is the study of the earth as a "system" with emphasis on the atmosphere, biosphere, 
hydrosphere, and lithosphere interactions as related to global change and human activities. (F) 

EASC-699. Environmental Problems Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides multidisciplinary examination of environmental problems and applica- 
tion of appropriate techniques of analysis to selected problems. Team taught by environmental 
faculty. (S) 



Jncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 29 1 



HORT600. Plant Tissue Culture Credit 3 (2-2) 

Theory and principles of plant cell, tissue and organ culture, and their application in crop im- 
provement will be studied. Prerequisites: NARS 110 and HORT 334. (S) 

HORT 611. Commercial Greenhouse Production Credits 3 (2-2) 

The culture of floriculture crops in the greenhouse with emphasis on seasonal production, mar- 
keting, insect and disease controls and plant growing structures will be studied. Prerequisites: 
HORT 334 and 610. (S) 

HORT 620. Vegetable Production Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course provides a comprehensive study of major and minor vegetable crops of North 
Carolina, the United States, and the world in relation to the industry, production practices, crop 
development, nutritional value, quality characteristics, marketing, and post-harvest handling 
and storage. Prerequisites: NARS 110 and SLSC 338. (F) 

NARS 608. Special Problems in Natural Resources Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is designed for students who desire to study special problems in Natural Resources; 
plant, soil, and environment. (F, S) 

NARS 610. Applied Spatial Statistics and GIS Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course introduces spatial statistical analysis techniques, which provide the students with 
the opportunity to conduct exploratory spatial data analysis with Arc View GIS, S-PLUS/ 
SpatialStats and the SAS/GIS Software. The focus of this course is on effective application of 
spatial data analysis in GIS environment; MATH 224 and GIS software or consent of instruc- 
tor. (DEMAND) 

NARS-618. General Forestry and Ecology Credit 3 (2-2) 

History, classification, culture, and utilization of native trees, with special emphasis on their 
importance as a conservation resource and the making of national forestry policy, and the eco- 
logical impact of trees on environmental quality. Prerequisite: Botany- 140. 

SLSC-621. Soil Microbiology Credit 4 (2-4) 

A study of soil micro and macro organisms and their role in elemental cycles, environmental 
pollution remediation and crop yields. Also, deals with the rhizosphere ecology and processes. 
Organic matter accumulation and carbon. 

SLSC-632. Soil Physics Credit 3 (2-2) 

This course is a study of fundamental physical principles and laws that govern the behavior of 
soils. Physical constitution of soil water, soil air and the relationship of soil physical conditions 
to plant growth and engineering usage will also be studied. Prerequisites: SLSC 338, CHEM 
102, and MATH 1 13, and consent of instructor. (S) 

SLSC-633. Soil Genesis, Classification and Land Use Credit 4 (2-4) 

Factors and processes of soil formation, grouping of soils based on their properties, soil map- 
ping, soil interpretations for various uses and discussion of new concepts in soil taxonomy. 
Prerequisite: SLSC 338. 

SLSC-634. Soil Environmental Chemistry Credit 4 (3-2) 

This course is a study of the chemical properties of soil environment including interactions of 
solid, liquid and gaseous phases. Discussion will also include ion and pollutant interactions 
with soil, their retention, potential movement and environmental impact. Additional discussion 
will include oxidation and reduction, soil acidity and alkalinity and their impact on waste man- 
agement, resource utilization and the environment. (S) 



292 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



i SLSC-640. Wetland Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

Designed to provide a basic understanding of benefits that wetlands in their natural conditions 
offer mankind, fish and wildlife habitat, water quality improvement, flood protection, filter 

: traps for pollutants, erosion control, natural products, recreation, and aesthetics. Primary in- 
structional areas include wetland ecology, wetland systems of the southeast region, wetland 
law and regulations , soil conditions of wetlands , hydrology of wetlands , methodology of delin- 
eating wetlands, wetland irrigation, plant and vegetation identification, and writing 
environmental reports. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 

( 

iHORT-700. Plant Biotechniques Credit 3 (1-4) 

Fundamentals of biotechniques in plant cell and tissue culture. These techniques are 
orgonogenesis, somatic embryogenesis isolation of plant cellular and plasmid DNA, RNA trans- 
1 formation and ELISA. 

AGEN-701 . Soil and Water Engineering II Credit 3 (3-0) 

The design of drainage and irrigation systems and their applicability to specific regions will be 
1 addressed. There will be in-depth discussion of saturated and un-saturated flow, and various 
'equations used to solve soil water movement. Open channel flow, well hydraulics, and earth 

damsor embankments will be covered. Prerequisite: AGEN-600 or consent of the instructor. 

h 

i EASC-708. Conservation of Natural Resources Credit 3 (3-0) 

A descriptive course dealing with conservation and development of renewable natural resources 
; encompassing soil, water, and air; cropland, grassland, and forests; livestock, fish, and wild- 
1 life; and recreational, aesthetic and scenic values. Attention will be given to protection and 
'•] development of the nation's renewable natural resources base as an essential part of the na- 
tional security, defense, and welfare. 

SLSC-710. Soils of North Carolina Credit 3 (2-2) 

\ A study of the factors basic to the understanding of the soils of North Carolina, their classifica- 
'< tion, and properties as related to sound land use and management. Prerequisite: Fundamentals 

of Soil Science 338. 

AGEN-714. Applied Hydrogeology Credit 3 (3-0) 

) This course covers principles of groundwater resource evaluation and the approach or tech- 
niques used to solve groundwater problems. Discussion includes methods used to quantitatively 
i appraise hydrogeologic parameters affecting water-yielding capacity of wells and aquifers. 
\ Various types of aquifers will be discussed under the umbrella of confined and unconfined 
j aquifers. Ground water quality, conservation and contamination will also be covered. 

\ SLSC-715. Soil Mineralogy Credit 3 (3-0) 

; A study of soil minerals with regard to their composition, structure, classification, identifica- 
tion, origin, and significance. Special emphasis on primary weatherable silicates, layer silicates, 
| and oxide minerals. Prerequisites: SLSC-634 and consent of the instructor. 

; SLSC-717. Methodology in Soil, Plant and Water Analysis Credit 3 (0-6) 

A study of principles involved in the analysis of soils, plants and water. Emphasis on basic 
i instrumental and chemical methods for interpretation of soil fertility and environment. Instruc- 
tion in the use of special instruments. 






Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 293 



EASC-718. Applied Environmental Microbiology Credit 3 (2-2) 

Discussion of interactions between micro-organisms and their physical environment, and sig- 
nificance of micro-organisms in eutrophication, mining spoils, and waste treatments. 
Prerequisites: General Microbiology-22 1 and consent of the instructor. 

NARS-720. Graduate Seminar in Natural Resources Credit 1 (1-0) 

SLSC-727. Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition Credit 3 (3-0) 

Fundamental and theoretical aspects of soil fertility, productivity and plant nutrients. A discus- 
sion of important research data on soil fertility and plant nutrition. Prerequisites: SLSC-517 
and consent of the instructor. 

SLSC-734. Applied Environmental Chemistry Credit 4 (3-2) 

This course is an in-depth discussion of soil chemical interaction in terms of ion exchange, 
solution equilibrium, solubility patterns and also electrochemistry; comprehensive coverage of 
the chemistry of contaminant interactions with soil, its retention, movement and the environ- 
mental impact; review of relevant advances in soil chemistry in the past and recent times. 
Prerequisite: SLSC-634 or equivalent. 

NARS-777. Special Problems in Plant Science Credit 3 (3-0) 

AGRI-799. Thesis Research in Agriculture and 

Environmental Science Credit 1-6 1 (1-0) to 6 (6-0) 

AGRI-999. Continuation of Thesis Credit 1 (1-0) 



294 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Physics 

Solomon Bililign, Chairperson 
101 MarteenaHall 

(336) 334-7733 

| OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Physics provides quality instruction, mentoring, and training in order 
I to produce competitive graduates who are trained in the arts of critical thinking, analytical 
\ I reasoning, independent learning, and problem solving. 

The Department of Physics has 7 full-time faculty and 4 adjunct faculty that participate in 
I four actively funded research areas. These include low- and medium-energy physics, experi- 
| mental and theoretical chemical physics, physics education, the physics of materials and geo- 
n sciences. To support these efforts, the department receives over $600,000 per year in research 
J funds. Each year, faculty and students publish over 20-refereed articles and make over 25 
presentations at national and international conferences. 

The department has strong and active collaborations with major research institutions such 
| as Duke University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Stanford University, and 
the University of Connecticut. Collaborations with national laboratories include the Joint Insti- 
i tute for Laboratory Astrophysics (JILA), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), 
1 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), 
M Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility 
( (JLab). International collaborations include the University of Marseilles in France and the Addis 
1 Ababa University in Ethiopia. 

RESEARCH PROGRAMS AND FACILITES 

There are five research groups in the department with adequate facilities. 

1 a. Low and Medium Energy Physics: Research carried out on campus and at Thomas 
Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory with 
support by a grant from the National Science Foundation. 

i b. Chemical Physics: Experimental and Theoretical: Facilities include: Two 20 Hz Nd: 
YAG lasers, two Continuum ND 6000 dye lasers, a UVX (frequency doubling and track- 
ing system), a Continuum Leopard picosecond laser with second, third and fourth har- 
monic generating crystals, Reflectron Time-of- Flight Mass Spectrometer with pulsed source 
and effusive source. Other Accessories include a 35 cm McPherson monochromator, a 
SPEX spectrometer, a Tektronix digital oscilloscope, Le Croy 4-channel, 3-GHz with 20 
GS/s sampling rate oscilloscope, box car averager and gated integrator system (Stanford 
System), power supply (Stanford), temperature controllers (Omega Engineering), PMT, 
PMT cooled housing, and optical components. 

In addition, for theoretical and computational work facilities include eight paralleled dual- 
processor Apple Macintosh G5 ("Big-Mac"), and several IBM and SUN servers. The Na- 
tional Science Foundation supports the research, 
c. Physics of Materials: Research in low temperature and semiconductor physics. 

Facilities include: closed cycle refrigerators, LR-400AC resistance bridge, tube furnace, 
ac susceptibility set up, crystal growth setup, water-cooled electromagnet (Varian) and 
Lakeshore EM4-HV water cooled electromagnet. 

Physics Education: Research on web-based education and innovative teaching methods 
and on creating a responsive learning environment. The research is supported by grants 
from The National Science Foundation and The Department of Education. Space and Earth 
Science Education development through NASA grant. 

Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 295 



e. Seismic Data Processing Facility: Research in seismic physical modeling, seismic data I 
analysis, subsurface imaging and non-destructive testing using ultrasonic waves. The I 
research is supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation. 

The School of Graduate Studies through the Department of Physics offers two program I 
tracks leading to the Master of Science in Physics, Professional Physics and Applied Physics, I 
as well as Computational Sciences with a Physics concentration. 

The Professional Physics track provides the comprehensive preparation needed for the I 
pursuit of a Ph.D. in physics or related areas. The Applied Physics track provides opportunity I 
for interdisciplinary studies and research with other science, engineering, and mathematics I 
programs to broaden the student's experience for employment in business, industry, or govern- I 
ment. The M.S. in computational sciences is an interdisciplinary program, where students can I 
work on a computational problem in physics after fulfilling the common requirements for the I 
program. 

DEGREES OFFERED 

MS in Physics with concentrations in 

Professional Physics 

Applied Physics 

Computational Sciences (Physics) 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

Admission to the M.S. in Physics degree program in the Department of Physics is based I 
upon the general admission requirements of the University. In addition, regular admission to 
the M.S. in Physics degree program requires the undergraduate degree in physics or its equiva- 
lent. Regular admission also requires that an applicant's background reflect maturity in physics 
from junior and senior level undergraduate courses in classical mechanics, electromagnetism, 
thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, and quantum physics. Applicants may be admitted 
to graduate studies unconditionally, provisionally, or as special students. Provisional admis- 
sion may be granted to those whose training is in other disciplines related to physics. 

DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS 

The M.S. in Physics degree program offers three options: the thesis option, the course 
work option and the project option. The thesis option requires a minimum of 30 semester hours, 
which includes 6 semester hours of thesis. The course work option requires a minimum of 33 
semester hours plus a comprehensive examination. The project option requires a minimum of 
30 semester hours plus 3 semester hours of special project. At least fifty percent of the courses 
counted towards the M.S. in Physics degree must be numbered 700 and above. In addition, the 
Professional Physics track requires a minimum of 24 semester hours of physics courses and the 
Applied Physics track requires a minimum of 18 semester hours of physics courses. The mini- 
mum physics course requirements include a core of competency courses in the following sub- 
jects: Classical Mechanics, Quantum Mechanics, Electromagnetic Theory, and Statistical 
Mechanics. 

To meet graduation requirements, students must maintain and complete the M.S. in Phys- 
ics program with an overall GPA of 3.0 or better on a scale of 4.0. Up to six semester hours of 
graduate work may be transferred from another university, provided it was not a part of any 
prior undergraduate degree requirement. The course content must adequately replace current 
graduate offerings in the student's curriculum. Transfer credits should be at a level comparable 
to 600 or 700 level courses at North Carolina A&T. 



296 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



SUGGESTED CURRICULUM GUIDE 



I First Semester 

i PHYS 600 Classical Mechanics 
J PHYS 615 Electromagnetic Theory I 
PHYS 620 Quantum Mechanics I 

First Semester 

j PHYS 7XX Elective 

or 
J 7XX Technical Elective 

: 1 PHYS 770 Research* 
or 
PHYS 760 Special Topics* 

or 
PHYS 740 Seminar* 
PHYS 791 Masters Project 

or 
PHYS 792 Masters Thesis 



First Year 
Credit Second Semester Credit 

3 PHYS 630 Statistical Mechanics 3 

3 PHYS 715 Electromagnetic Theory n 3 

3 PHYS 720 Quantum Mechanics n 3 



Second Year 
Credit Second Semester 

PHYS 7XX Elective 

3 7XX Technical Elective 

PHYS 770 Research* 

PHYS760 Special Topics* 

0-3 PHYS 740 Seminar* 
3 PHYS 791 Masters Project 

0-6 PHYS 792 Masters Thesis 



Credit 



0-3 

3 

0-6 



* Graduate courses in Research, Special Topics, or Seminar may be substituted from other 
technical areas upon appropriate approvals. 

List of Courses 

Course Description 

PHYS 600* Classical Mechanics 

PHYS 601 Selected Topics in Geophysics 

PHYS 602 Introduction to Geophysical Research 

PHYS 605 Mathematical Methods 

PHYS 615* Electromagnetic Theory I 

PHYS 620* Quantum Mechanics I 

PHYS 630* Statistical Mechanics 

PHYS 715* Electromagnetic Theory II 

PHYS 720* Quantum Mechanics II 

PHYS 730 Optical Properties of Matter 

PHYS 735 Atomic & Molecular Physics 

PHYS 736 Spectroscopic Techniques 

PHYS 737 Physics of Solids 

PHYS 738 Nuclear Physics 

PHYS 739 High Energy Physics 

PHYS 740 Graduate Seminar 

PHYS 743 Experimental Methods in Physics 

PHYS 744 Introduction to Computational Methods 

in the Physical & Biological Sciences 

PHYS 745 Computational Physics 

PHYS 750 Relativistic Quantum Mechanics I 

PHYS 751 Relativistic Quantum Mechanics II 

PHYS 760 Special Topics 



c 

3 


redit 

(3-0) 


3 


(2-2) 


3 


(1-4) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 


Var. 1-3 


3 


(2-3) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(2-3) 


3 


(3-0) 


3 


(3-0) 



Var. 1-3 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



297 



PHYS 770 Research 

PHYS791 Masters Project 

PHYS 792 Masters Thesis 

^Required Core Courses 



Var. 


1-9 


3 (3-0) 


Var. 


1-6 


Credit 


Var. 


1-6 


Var. 


1-6 


Var. 


1-6 


Var. 


1-6 


Var. 


1-6 



Courses for Professional Teachers 

Course Description 

PHYS 705 Physics for Science Teachers I 

PHYS 706 Physics for Science Teachers II 

PHYS 707 Physics for Science Teachers III 

PHYS 708 Physics for Science Teachers IV 

PHYS 709 Physics for Science Teachers V 

COURSES WITH DESCRIPTION IN PHYSICS 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

PHYS-600. Classical Mechanics Credit 3 (3-0) 

A theoretical treatment of particle and rigid body dynamics. Topics include variational prin- 
ciples, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, the physics of rotation, oscillations, canonical 
transformations and Hamilton's equations, and Hamilton-Jacobi theory. Prerequisite: Physics- 
401 or Graduate standing. 

PHYS-601. Special Topics in Geophysics Credit 3 (2-2) 

This is an advanced undergraduate and graduate course on selected topics in applied and com- 
putational geophysics . A descriptive title and syllabus must have received departmental approval 
before scheduling. Students' records will carry both course number and descriptive title. The 
course may be repeated to earn a maximum of six credit hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 241 or 
permission of instructor. 

PHYS-602. Introduction to Geophysical Research Credit 3 (1-4) 

This course involves student participation in research training in geophysical sciences con- 
ducted by faculty. It offers structured education and research training activities that guide 
experiences in geophysical topics, techniques and research projects involving geophysical sur- 
veys, physical modeling and numerical simulation. The course may be repeated to earn a 
maximum of six credit hours. The course is conducted in a lecture-laboratory format with one 
hour of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 60 1 or permission of 
instructor. 

PHYS-605. Mathematical Methods Credit 3 (3-0) 

Covers topics in mathematical physics: vector calculus, complex variables, Fourier theory, 
special functions and boundary value problems, variational methods, Green functions. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. 

PHYS-615. Electromagnetic Theory I Credit 3 (3-0) 

Along with Physics 715, is an advanced study of electromagnetic phenomena: electromagnetic 
properties of matter; propagation, radiation, and absorption of electromagnetic waves; simple 
radiating systems; special relativity, covariant electrodynamics; radiation by moving charges. 
Prerequisite: Physics-416 or Graduate standing. 



298 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



PHYS-620. Quantum Mechanics I Credit 3 (3-0) 

An advanced study of quantum theory that, along with Physics 720, covers the fundamental 
concepts and formulations: theory of measurement with applications to simple physical sys- 
tems, operator formalism, symmetries and in variance, system of identical particles, angular 
momentum and the theory of spin, variational and perturbation approximation techniques, time- 
dependent perturbation theory and radiation, scattering theory with applications. Prerequisite: 
Physics-422 or Graduate standing. 

PHYS-630. Statistical Mechanics Credit 3 (3-0) 

Fundamentals of classical and quantum statistical mechanics: statistical ensembles and distri- 
bution functions, non-interacting particles, ideal Fermi and Bose systems, treatment of interacting 
systems, phase transitions, approaches to collective phenomena. Prerequisite: Physics-430 or 
Graduate standing. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 

PHYS-715. Electromagnetic Theory II Credit 3 (3-0) 

A continuation of Physics-615. Prerequisite: Physics-615. 

PHYS-720. Quantum Mechanics II Credit 3 (3-0) 

A continuation of Physics-620. Prerequisite: Physics-620. 

PHYS-730. Optical Properties of Matter Credit 3 (3-0) 

Classical wave properties of light and quantum mechanical treatment of the interaction of light 
and matter: interference, diffraction, absorption, scattering, and polarization of light, interac- 
tion with atoms, atomic structure, optical absorption and emission, laser theory. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. 

PHYS-735. Atomic and Molecular Physics Credit 3 (3-0) 

An advanced study of atomic and molecular systems. Topics include many-electron atoms, 
Hartree-Fock and self-consistent field methods, interaction of many-electron atoms with elec- 
tromagnetic fields, diatomic molecules, Born-Oppenheimer approximation, rotation and 
vibration and electron spectra of diatomic molecules, polyatomic systems, laser spectroscopy, 
and molecular dynamics. Prerequisite: Physics-465 or Graduate standing. 

PHYS-736. Spectroscopic Techniques Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course describes the methods and instrumentation of several spectroscopic techniques 
such as laser spectroscopy, optical resonance spectroscopy, supersonically cooled molecular 
spectroscopy, multiple-photon spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman scattering, 
Mossbauer spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron spin resonance 
spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy. Prerequisites: Physics-465, 420 or Graduate standing 

PHYS-737. Physics of Solids Credit 3 (3-0) 

An advanced study of the physics of solids with applications to metals, semiconductors and 
insulators. Topics include electronic structures, dynamics of electrons in solids, transport prop- 
erties, optical properties, magnetic properties and superconductivity. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or consent of the instructor. 

PHYS-738. Nuclear Physics Credit 3 (3-0) 

Descriptions of properties of the nuclear force and nuclear structure: nucleon-nucleon scatter- 
ing, nuclear scattering theory, phenomenological potential models, the shell model, collective 
motion, giant resonances, direct and compound reactions, few-body systems, heavy ion phys- 
ics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 299 



PHYS-739. High Energy Physics Credit 3 (3-0) 

Theoretical and experimental concepts in high energy physics. Topics include elementary par- 
ticles; conservation laws; strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions; particle accelerators; 
beams and detectors; strange particles; and quark models. Prerequisite: Physics-738 or Gradu- 
ate standing. 

PHYS-740. Graduate Seminar Variable Credit (1-3) 

A survey of current developments in physics. 

PHYS-743. Experimental Methods Credit 3 (2-3) 

Theory and techniques of measurement in experimental physics: experimental design, detector 
development, signal processing techniques, data acquisition, error analysis, statistics and the 
treatment of experimental data. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. 

PHYS 744. Introduction to Computational Methods in the 

Physical & Biological Sciences Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will offer an introduction to computational methods used in physics, chemistry and 
biology. It will survey the various methods used in those areas and give hands-on experience 
with some software. This may include, but not limited to: quantum chemistry calculations, 
electronic structure, empirical force fields and molecular mechanics, energy minimization, Monte 
Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations, structure of proteins, RNA/DNA sequence search 
and pattern recognition. 

PHYS-745. Computational Physics Credit 3 (2-3) 

Computational approaches to advanced physical problems. Includes ordinary differential equa- 
tions, boundary value and eigenvalue problems, matrix operations, Monte Carlo Methods, 
nonlinear equations, curve fitting, and approximation of functions. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing or consent of instructor. 

PHYS-750. Relativistic Quantum Mechanics I Credit 3 (3-0) 

Along with Physics-75 1 covers the Dirac equation and elementary mass renormalization, propa- 
gator theory, second quantization, the quantization of the electromagnetic field, Feynman graphs, 
calculations in quantum electrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics, gauge theories, mod- 
els of electromagnetic, weak and strong interactions. Prerequisite: Physics-720 or Graduate 
standing. 

PHYS-751. Relativistic Quantum Mechanics II Credit 3 (3-0) 

A continuation of Physics-750. Prerequisite: Physics-750. 

PHYS-760. Special Topics Variable Credit (1-3) 

Studies in physics under faculty guidance. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

PHYS-770. Research Variable Credit (1-9) 

This course is a supervised research under the mentorship of a faculty mentor. It is not neces- 
sarily intended to serve as the project or thesis topic of a master's student. 

PHYS-791. Masters Project Credit 3 (3-0) 

The student will conduct a research project under the supervision of an advisor. The project 
could be experimental, theoretical, or a literature survey on a topic of interest to the student. 
This course is available to project option students. Prerequisite: Consent of advisor and mas- 
ters standing. 



300 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



PHYS-792. Masters Thesis Variable Credit (1-6) 

The Master of Science thesis research will be conducted under the supervision of a thesis 
advisor to the completion of a masters thesis. The course is available to thesis option students. 
Consent of advisor and masters standing. 

PROFESSIONAL TEACHERS PROGRAM 

PHYS-705. Physics for Science Teachers I Variable Credit (1-6) 

For in-service teachers. Course covers fundamentals of astronomy and earth science. Full de- 
scriptive title, syllabus and the amount of credit will have received departmental approval before 
scheduling. Prerequisite: MATH-111 or equivalent. 

PHYS-706. Physics for Science Teachers II Variable Credit (1-6) 

For in-service teachers. Lecture and integrated lab study of the fundamental principles of me- 
chanics, thermodynamics, wave motion, electricity and magnetism, optics and modern physics. 
Full descriptive title, syllabus and the amount of credit will have received departmental ap- 
proval before scheduling. Focus: Mechanics and Thermodynamics. Prerequisite: MATH-111 
or equivalent. 

PHYS-707. Physics for Science Teachers III Variable Credit (1-6) 

A continuation of PHYS-706. Focus: Wave motion and electricity and magnetism. Prerequi- 
site: PHYS-706 or equivalent. 

PHYS-708. Physics for Science Teachers IV Variable Credit (1-6) 

A continuation of PHYS-707. Focus: Optics and modern physics. Prerequisite: PHYS-707 or 
equivalent. 

PHYS-709. Physics for Science Teachers V Variable Credit (1-6) 

A continuation of PHYS-708. Focus: Modern Physics. Prerequisite: PHYS-708 or equivalent. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 301 



Social Work 



Joint Master of Social Work Program* 
Department of Sociology & Social Work 

Dr. Arnold Barnes (NC A&T SU), Co- Director - 336-334-7894 
Dr. John Rife (UNCG), Co- Director - 336-334-4098 

The Joint Master of Social Work (JMSW) program represents the efforts of faculty and 
administrators at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University (NC A&T SU) 
and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG). The administration of the JMSW 
program rotates between the two campuses every four years. 

This is a single academic program with instruction by faculty from each department. Stu- 
dents attend classes on the campuses of both universities and have access to all academic and 
support services of the two universities. 

There are two portals of entry, each requiring 60 semester hours. The two portals are: 

1 . The full-time program which is completed in two years, and 

2. The three-year part-time program with classes offered on Saturdays. 

The Joint Master of Social Work Program is accredited by the Council on Social Work 
Education. 

The JMSW curriculum has been designed by the joint faculty from both institutions to 
provide students with advanced generalist social work education. The model for the curricu- 
lum is based on contemporary, state-of-the-art theory and practice methods. Courses reflect the 
theme of providing effective services to families in urban and rural North Carolina communi- 
ties. The curriculum is organized by foundation, area of practice, advanced generalist integra- 
tive seminars, and field instruction. The primary purpose of the MSW program is to prepare 
students for advanced generalist social work practice. 

* Jointly administered with UNCG 

Program goals are: 

Goal 1 : To prepare graduate students for employment as advanced generalist social work prac- 
titioners in direct and indirect practice. 

Goal 2: To provide students with a graduate advanced generalist social work curriculum that 
results in the acquisition and demonstration of: 

A. Knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, social welfare policy, 
research, practice methods, cultural diversity, populations at-risk, social and eco- 
nomic justice, and social work values and ethics as a foundation for generalist 
social work practice 

B . The professional self as reflected in an affiliation with the profession of social 
work 

C. The values and ethics of professional social work practice as stated by the Na- 
tional Association of Social Worker's Code of Ethics 

D. Advanced generalist social work practice skills with individuals, families, groups, 
organizations, and communities. 

Goal 3: To provide professional service that ameliorates social problems, provides leader- 
ship, and benefits our communities in Central and Western North Carolina. 

Goal 4: To conduct and disseminate research that contributes to the knowledge base for effec- 
tive social work practice. 



302 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



CURRICULUM PLAN 



The curriculum design of the program provides students with a theoretical and applied 
education in social work to enhance and promote advanced generalist social work education. 
The two-year program is organized to insure that all students, as advanced social work practi- 
tioners, will be prepared to independently engage in social work practice with individuals, 
families, small groups, organizations, and communities in their chosen area of practice. Stu- 
dents will be prepared to serve as managers, supervisors, researchers and social planners. The 
concentration of the program is advanced generalist practice. 

COURSE OF STUDY AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

The MSW program is a two-year program of 60 credits that will require full time enroll- 
ment by students. The program offers a foundation year and a second year of concentration 
content for advanced practice. 



First Year Foundation Courses (30 Hours) 

NCA&TSU 



UNC-G 



SOWK 501 
SOWK 502 
SOWK 504 
SOWK 560 
SOWK 511 



First Semester 

SOWK 700 Human Behavior and Social Functioning I 

SOWK 70 1 Social Welfare Policy and Analysis I 

SOWK 703 Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families 

SOWK 704 Social Work with Groups 

SOWK 705 Social Work Practice and Human Diversity 

Second Semester 

SOWK 702 Human Behavior and Social Functioning II 
SOWK 707 Social Work Research Methods I 
SOWK 708 Social Work Practice with Communities 

and Organizations I 
SOWK 709 Field Instruction and Seminar I 



Second Year- Advanced Curriculum (30 Hours) 



15 Credit Hours 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 

15 Credit Hours 

3 
3 
3 



6 

15 



SOWK 517 
SOWK 503 
SOWK 514 

SOWK 516 



First Semester Area of Practice Course 

SOWK 706 Social Policy and Welfare Analysis II 
SOWK 710 Social Work with Families and Youth at Risk I 
SOWK 7 1 2 Social Work in Health and Mental Health I 
SOWK 7 1 8 Research Designs & Data Analysis for Social Work 

Practice 
SOWK 722 Field Instruction and Seminar II 

Second Semester Area of Practice Course 



SOWK 711 
SOWK 713 
SOWK 716 
Elective 
SOWK 724 



Social Work with Families and Youth at Risk II 
Social Work in Health and Mental Health II 
Social Work in Administration 

Field Instruction and Seminar III 

Total Hours 



Credit 

3 
3 



3 
6 
15 

Credit 

3 

3 
3 
6 
15 
60 



SOWK 512 
SOWK 601 
SOWK 602 

SOWK 513 



SOWK 611 
SOWK 612 
SOWK 605 

SOWK 616 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



303 



FOUNDATION YEAR 

During the first year, students complete 30 semester hours of foundation course work. In 
the first semester of the first year, students complete courses in human behavior and social 
functioning, social welfare policy, social work practice and human diversity, social work prac- 
tice with individuals and families, and social work practice with groups. In the second semester 
of the first year, students complete a second human behavior and social functioning course, 
social work practice with communities and organizations, social work research methods, and a 
six semester hour foundation field instruction placement and seminar. The purpose of the foun- 
dation course work during the first year is to prepare students for the advanced generalist prac- 
tice year. 

ADVANCED GENERALIST PRACTICE YEAR 

In the second year of study, students complete the concentration in advanced generalist 
practice. The second year of study requires the completion of 30 semester hours of course 
work. Students choose one of three advanced generalist practice areas: families and youth at 
risk, mental health, or health. Students complete two courses in their advanced generalist prac- 
tice area, advanced courses in social welfare, administration, and research, and they complete 
two semesters of advanced generalist field instruction, which includes a field seminar and a 
capstone project. Students also complete one graduate level elective. Choice of this elective 
requires the approval of the student's educational advisor. 

ADMISSIONS 

A Joint Admissions Committee has been established for this program. It is comprised of 
faculty members from NCA&TSU and faculty members from UNCG. These committee mem- 
bers use a common evaluation system to review applications and recommend applicants for 
admission. 

In addition to the admission materials set forth by The Graduate School, applicants must 
complete the following prerequisites to become eligible for admissions review: 

1. Completion of a baccalaureate degree, with competitive grades, from an accredited 
college or university in the United States or its equivalent in another country; 

2. A "B" average or better in the undergraduate major; 

3. An overall minimum GPA of 2.5 and an acceptable score on the GRE; 

4. Evidence of a liberal arts foundation to include the following minimum 30 credit 
hours: 

18 Social and Behavioral Sciences* 
6 Humanities 
3 Human Biology 
3 Statistics 
30 Hours 
* (Political Science, Psychology, Anthropology, Economics, Ethnic/Global Studies, History, 
and Sociology). 

5. Applicants must demonstrate intellectual and personal qualifications considered es- 
sential to the successful practice of social work, such as sensitivity and responsiveness 
in relationships, concern for the need of others, adaptability, good judgment, creativity, 
integrity, and skill in oral and written communication. This determination shall be based 
on a review of the applicant's references and written personal statement. 



304 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Documentation validating that applicants meet the above criteria will be required in the 
, admission packet. Members of the Joint Admissions Committee and staff at the two graduate 
schools will verify that acceptable validation of these five criteria have been included in appli- 
cants admission materials. 

The Joint Admissions Committee has established five areas that will be rated to determine 
admission decisions: 

1 . Acceptable GRE scores; 

2. GPA averaged from all undergraduate and graduate degrees; 

3. Three letters of recommendation; 

4. Relevant paid and/or volunteer experience (including internships in social work); and, 

5. A personal statement indicating why applicant is seeking admission, what applicant 
wants to learn and the factors that influenced this decision. 

Consistent rating measures have been established for the evaluation of the five above 
I areas. The Joint Admissions Committee has developed a review process that ensures a consis- 
tent and fair evaluation of applicants. All applicants will be notified in writing of the Joint 
Admissions Committee decisions by The Graduate School. 

The M.S.W. Program does not grant academic credit for life or work experience. Only 
students who have been admitted to the program and who have completed all required prereq- 
uisite course work may be admitted to practice courses and to the field instruction program. 

The program admits students only once a year for Fall semester enrollment. Questions 
concerning the MSW program may be addressed to the Department of Sociology & Social 
Work, NCA&TSU. The phone number is (336) 334-7894. All inquiries concerning admission 
for Fall 2007 should be directed to: The Graduate School, University of North Carolina at 
i Greensboro, PO Box 26176, Greensboro, NC 27402-6176. The phone number is (336) 334- 
5596. 

Applications for admission of Fall 2003 - 2006 will be processed through the School of 
i Graduate Studies, North Carolina A&T State University, 1601 East Market Street, 120 Gibbs 
Hall, Greensboro, NC 27411. The phone number is (336) 334-7920. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS IN SOCIALWORK 

SOWK-700. Human Behavior and Social Functioning I Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is the first of a two course sequence on human behavior in the social environment. 
This course emphasizes theories of human behavior and intervention with people in a variety 
of systems, including individuals, families, and small groups. Students will learn an ecological 
framework for understanding and assessing human behavior in social and cultural contexts. 
Content about various oppressed and vulnerable groups is included. Culture is examined to 
analyze how it affects clients and workers perceptions of problems, their conceptualizations of 
strategies for problem- solving, their orientations in measuring treatment outcomes, and the 
efficacy of the worker-client relationship. 

SOWK-701. Social Welfare Policy and Analysis I Credit 3 (3-0) 

This first foundation policy course is designed to help the student examine philosophical, so- 
cial, political, psychological, and economic factors that have influenced the emergence of social 
welfare as a social institution. Students learn to analyze social policy for its effects on individu- 
als, families, various oppressed and vulnerable groups, and communities. The impact of social 
policy on service delivery in rural areas will be highlighted. This is the first of two policy 
courses. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 305 



SOWK-702. Human Behavior and Social Functioning II Credit 3 (3-0) 

Human Behavior and Social Functioning II provides students with the knowledge necessary to 
analyze institutional, social and cultural environments in which human behavior occurs, and 
the reciprocal interaction between individuals, communities, organizations, groups and fami- 
lies. The course provides students with the concepts and knowledge necessary to understand 
adult development and the development of families and groups in community. HBSF II builds 
on personality and developmental theory that was introduced in HBSF I to emphasize the 
biopsychosocial-spiritual nature of human beings in their family environment. This course pre- 
sents groups and families as social entities that affect and are affected by individual social 
functioning and behaviors. 

SOWK-704. Social Work with Groups 

The purpose of this course is to prepare students for entry into field instruction. In this course 
students will begin to develop the knowledge and skills necessary for advanced generalist prac- 
tice with groups. Students will learn four basic group work models. Special attention is devoted 
to developing relationships and working effectively at the mezzo level with individuals of di- 
verse cultural and racial backgrounds along with populations at risk. Students will learn how to 
effectively set-up, plan, facilitate and evaluate groups across social work settings. This course 
will provide hands on learning through a small group experience as part of each class. 

SOWK-705. Social Work Practice and Human Diversity I Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will examine cultural and social diversity and address theoretical and practice 
dimensions of social practice with oppressed people of color, women, the aged, the sexually 
diverse, and the physically disabled. The concepts of ethnicity, minority status, social stratifi- 
cation, and sexual preference are explored in the context of American culture and are translated 
into the impact of dealing with these issues with clients, the system, and with the helper. 

SOWK-706. Social Welfare Policy and Analysis II Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course, the second foundation course in social welfare policy, presents social welfare 
policy analysis as another form of social work practice, with a repertoire of roles, functions, 
and skills as in other practice concentrations such as interpersonal or planning and manage- 
ment. As a part of this school's professional curriculum, the course will embody the primary 
value of social justice as it examines policies, programs and current delivery systems in ad- 
dressing issues affecting families, mental and health care. Strategies to shape and frame policy 
at various levels are addressed. 

SOWK-707. Social Work Research Methods I Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is the first of two research courses in the MSW curriculum. The intention of both 
courses is to prepare the social work practitioner to use research as a means of informing and 
improving one's professional practice. The primary purpose of this course is to provide a frame- 
work for the rigorous study of research methodology as it relates to the professional practice of 
social work. As a result of this course, students will learn, appreciate, and be able to apply 
quantitative and qualitative research strategies to address fundamental social work problems 
and processes. 

SOWK-708. Social Work Practice with Communities, and Organizations Credit 3 (3-0) 
This course is designed to prepare students to practice in the area of macro social work. Ad- 
vanced generalist social workers must be prepared to respond to and influence changing social 
and political environments. This course prepares students for involvement in broad scale social 
systems change particularly in group, community, and organizational development and analy- 
sis. This course provides a framework for exploring knowledge, analytical skills, and professional 
behavior appropriate for practice with work groups, communities, and organizations. Particu- 
lar emphasis will be given to the multidimensional strategies for professional intervention. 

306 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



SOWK-709. Field Instruction and Seminar I Credit 6 (6-0) 

This is the first year of the field curriculum. The purpose of the two courses is to provide an 
opportunity to students to synthesize theoretical knowledge for application within a variety of 
agency settings and among diverse client systems. Students are expected to apply theories and 
concepts from previous courses in the role of a professional social work practitioner within the 
client system of various field agency experiences. Field seminar will run concurrently with the 
field practicum. Student field days are typically Wednesday, Thursday and Friday for a total of 
24 clock hours per week. 

SOWK-710. Social Work with Families and Youth at Risk I Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is the first course in the concentration on Social Work with Families and Youth at Risk. 
This course will integrate elements of social policy that affect families with the theory, knowl- 
edge, and skills necessary to work with diverse family forms at different stages of life. Building 
on foundation year content regarding the families, this course will prepare students to assess 
and intervene with families at an advanced level. An ecological systems perspective will be 
utilized to help students understand the relationships between individuals and their families 
and between families and the various social systems with which they interact. 

SOWK-711. Social Work with Families and Youth at Risk II Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is the second course in the concentration sequence on Social Work with Families and 
Youth at Risk. This course will build on the advanced knowledge and skill gained in the previ- 
ous course and allows students to apply that knowledge to specific problems faced by families 
across the life span. By participating in this problem-focused course, students will have an 
opportunity to learn more about the types of problems families face in the United States and 
how to use various interventive models most appropriate to specific types of problems. 

SOWK-712. Social Work in Health and Mental Health I Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is the first of two courses in the Health and Mental Health area of practice. This 
first course focuses on health and mental health disorders across the life span as well as an 
exploration of the complex interrelationships between health and mental health care practices, 
social work values, and ethical dilemmas. Students will integrate knowledge and skills to en- 
gage in advanced generalist social work practice in health and mental health settings. This 
course will address policy and procedural issues unique to the administration and program 
services within health and mental health settings. 

SOWK-713. Social Work in Health and Mental Health II Credit 3 (3-0) 

This is the second course in the Health and Mental Health area of practice. This course contin- 
ues to focus on health and mental health disorders across the life span as well as an examination 
of effective direct and indirect practice interventions. Material on models for working with 
clients, family members, and caregivers, will be covered. Attention is given to understanding 
differential patterns of health care service utilization and delivery based on demographic char- 
acteristics such as age, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation. Current policy initiatives 
and social work roles within health and mental health settings are examined. 

SOWK-716. Social Work in Administration Credit 3 (3-0) 

As advanced generalist practitioners, students must be prepared for indirect as well as direct 
practice roles. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the basic knowledge and 
skills necessary to function as a social work supervisor and manager. Students from the three 
concentrations will take this course together, thus allowing all students to gain a broader under- 
standing of social work administrative issues in various fields of practice. This course will 
highlight specific issues relevant to social work management in both urban and under-served 
rural areas. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 307 



SOWK-718. Research Designs and Data Analysis for Social Work Practice Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is the second of two research courses in the MSW curriculum. The intention of 
both courses is to prepare the social work practitioner to use research as a means of informing 
and improving one's professional practice. Students will be able to apply quantitative and quali- 
tative research strategies to address fundamental social work problems and processes Elective 
Credit 3 (3-0) 

SOWK-722. and SOWK-724. Field Instruction and Seminar II and III Credit 6 (6-0) 

Second year field is a culmination of the academic preparation for Social Work practice. As 
advanced Generalists, students are expected to demonstrate understanding and application of 
social work theories, skills and interventions. Additionally, students are expected to assume 
greater independence in their own practice. Field Seminar will run concurrently with the field 
practicum. Student field days will typically be Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays of each 
week, August- May. Specialized placements in School Social Work require a longer placement. 
School social work internships include activity three days a week for the academic year, August- 
June. 



308 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Department of Sociology and Social Work 

Dr. Robert Davis, Interim Chairperson 
201 Gibbs Hall 

Note: The courses listed below are offered to advanced undergraduate and graduate students 
only. Please note that these courses are not part of the Joint Master of Social Work (JMSW) 

curriculum. 

i 

Courses Offered for Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate Students 

SOCI-600 Seminar in Social Planning 

SOCI-601 Seminar in Urban Studies 

SOCI-603 Introduction to Folklore 

SOCI-625 Sociology /Social Service Internship 

SOCI-650 Independent Study in Anthropology 

SOCI-65 1 Anthropological Experience 

SOCI-669 Small Groups 

SOCI-670 Law and Society 

SOCI-672 Selected Issues in Sociology 

SOCI-674 Evaluation of Social Programs 

SOCI-701 Seminar in Cultural Factors in Communication 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



309 



Transportation and Logistics 



John A. Cole, Interim Chairperson 

Room 225, Merrick Hall 

(336) 334-7744 

OBJECTIVE 

The Department of Economics and Transportation/Logistics offers a program of study 
leading to the Master of Science in Management degree with a major concentration in Trans- 
portation and Logistics. The program prepares students and professionals for careers in public 
and private sector positions in transportation and business logistics. The program blends tradi- 
tional management education in the areas of marketing, management, and quantitative analy- 
sis, with specialized core competencies relating to transportation planning, transportation and 
business logistics, supply chain and materials management, and purchasing. 

DEGREE OFFERED 

Master of Science in Management - Transportation and Logistics 

CERTIFICATE IN SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT 

The Department also offers a program of study leading to a certificate in Supply Chain 
Management. This program is designed for individuals holding a college degree in any field of 
study and working in Supply Chain Management or related fields. It prepares individuals for 
upper level management positions and is tailored for those who have full time positions and 
can only study on a part-time basis. The program consists of the five courses listed below: 

TRAN 701: Strategic Logistics Management 

TRAN 720: Analysis and Design of Supply Chain Systems 

TRAN 725: Purchasing and Materials Management 

TRAN 727: Global Supply Chain Management 

BUAD 713: Business Applications Development 

All five courses above must be completed with a grade of "C" or above to receive the 
certificate. Should an individual desire to enter the graduate program at some future date, a 
grade of "B" or above will be required. 

GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS (MSM) 

The general requirements for admission are an undergraduate degree from an accredited 
institution with a grade point average of 2.6 (on a 4.0 scale), and a satisfactory GMAT score. 
Applicants who do not meet the requirements will be considered on an individual basis. A GPA 
of 3.0 is required for graduation. 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

Students with a variety of undergraduate majors are encouraged to apply. The program is 
designed to appeal to those who either currently work in industry or desire to affiliate with firms 
or organizations using cutting-edge tools to deliver their products or services. Students in the 
program will have a business undergraduate degree and wish to study a particular area in greater 
depth, or have a non-business degree with the personal or professional interests or experiences 
that would be enhanced by a high quality graduate program in management education. 



310 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



The program requires a minimum of 36 semester hours. There is no thesis requirement. 
Students without an undergraduate business degree will be required to take appropriate foun- 
dation courses, which may extend the requirements to 48 semester hours. The program consists 
of 21 hours of core courses, including one 3-hour elective, and 15 hours of coursework in the 
major concentration. 

The student pursuing the Master of Science in Management with a major concentration in 
Transportation/Logistics is required to complete a common core of courses consisting of: 
ACCT 714 Managerial Accounting & Finance 3 semester hours 

BUAD 713 Business Applications Development 3 semester hours 

BUAD 715 Quantitative Business Analysis 3 semester hours 

BUAD 716 Strategic Marketing 3 semester hours 

BUAD 718 Management & Organization Analysis 3 semester hours 

ECON 608 Managerial Economics 3 semester hours 

ELECTIVE One course selected from the following: 

TRAN 665 Transportation Regulation and National Policy 3 semester hours 

BUAD 719 Information Systems Planning and Design 3 semester hours 

Courses in the Transportation and Logistics concentration will consist of the following: 

TRAN 701 Strategic Logistics Management 3 semester hours 

TRAN 720 Analysis and Design of Supply Chain Systems 3 semester hours 

TRAN 725 Purchasing and Materials Management 3 semester hours 

TRAN 727 Global Supply Chain Management 3 semester hours 

TRAN 730 Transportation Planning 3 semester hours 

Students without an undergraduate business-related degree will be required to take appropriate 

foundation courses, which consist of the following. 

ACCT 708 Seminar in Financial Concepts 3 semester hours 

BUAD 705 Seminar in Business Analysis 3 semester hours 

BUAD 712 Foundation of Enterprise Management 3 semester hours 

ECON 706 Seminar in Economics 3 semester hours 



LIST OF GRADUATE COURSES 

Course Description 

ACCT 643 Advanced Income Tax Accounting 

ACCT 708 Seminar in Financial Concepts 

ACCT 714 Managerial Accounting & Finance 

BUAD 705 Seminar in Business Analysis 

BUAD 712 Foundation of Enterprise Management 

BUAD 713 Business Applications Development 

BUAD 715 Quantitative Business Analysis 

BUAD 716 Strategic Marketing 

BUAD 7 1 8 Management & Organization Analysis 

BUAD 719 Information Systems Planning and Design 

ECON 608 Managerial Economics 

ECON 706 Seminar in Economics 

TRAN 701 Strategic Logistics Management 

TRAN 720 Analysis and Design of Supply Chain Management 

TRAN 725 Purchasing and Materials Management 

TRAN 727 Global Supply Chain Management 

TRAN 730 Transportation Planning 



Credit 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



311 



COURSES WITH DESCRIPTION IN 
ECONOMICS AND TRANSPORTATION AND LOGISTICS 

BUAD 713. Business Applications Development Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on application development and tools for business solutions. Concepts 
associated with the design, creation, and implementation of computer programs are studied. 
Application algorithms are designed using supportive software tools such as flowcharts, 
pseudocode, and hierarchy charts. Emphasis is placed on the development of applications us- 
ing systems methods, top-down design, testing, debugging, modularity, and structured techniques 
to be implemented and maintained in a variety of business environments. This course uses an 
object-oriented programming language. 

BUAD 719. Information Systems Planning and Design Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course provides students with an understanding of the concepts of planning, analysis, 
design, and implementation of modern information systems. Techniques used in this course are 
project tracking, structured analysis and design, prototyping, and techniques for incorporating 
human factors considerations. These project planning and design issues will be discussed both 
in terms of the traditional systems development life cycle and in terms of business process 
reengineering. Students will use both Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools, 
Business Process Reengineering (BPR) and Project Tracking (GANTT network diagrams, task 
tracking) tools in their project work. 

ECON-608. Managerial Economics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course will apply economic principles to decision-making in management. The basic tools 
and methods of analysis are derived mainly from microeconomics. Additional tools discussed 
include statistical methods, operations research, financial analysis, and decision-making theory 
that are applied to managerial problems. Particular emphasis will be placed on demand analy- 
sis, forecasting, pricing and output decisions, cost-benefit analysis, present value analysis, 
cost-benefit analysis, capital budgeting, risk analysis, and decision-making under uncertainty. 

ECON-706. Seminar in Economics Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course introduces basic microeconomic principles and their applications in business. Ba- 
sic economic concepts, including marginal analysis of consumer and firm decisions, will be 
covered along with macroeconomic theories that support managers' understanding of the glo- 
bal economic environment and the economic policies affecting that environment. 

TRAN-701. Strategic Logistics Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course is designed to introduce students to the critical role of logistics in the achievement 
of strategic objectives. This approach involves all activities associated with moving raw mate- 
rials, inventory, and finished goods from the point of origin to the point of use or consumption. 
The course addresses logistics strategy, planning, customer service goals, transportation funda- 
mentals and decision-making, transportation strategy, inventory and location strategies, 
organization and control. 

TRAN-720. Analysis and Design of Transportation and Logistics Systems Credit 3 (3-0) 

This logistics modeling course deals with various ways of modeling logistics forecasts to fa- 
cilitate supply chain management, mode selection, distribution planning, facility location, 
network design and optimization, routing and scheduling. Software will be used extensively to 
model logistics and supply chain applications. 



312 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



TRAN-725. Purchasing and Materials Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course focuses on purchasing as the integration of long-term materials planning with 
corporate strategic planning process. The increasingly strategic role played by the purchasing 
professional in an organization is also examined. Areas receiving special attention include col- 
laborative participation in the identification and procurement of key material requirements, 
determination and application of supplier qualification and selection activities, implementa- 
tion of supplier development programs, relationship building programs, and participation in 
supply chain development decisions. 

TRAN-727. Global Supply Chain Management Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course addresses issues in global supply chain management. Some topics addressed are 
international sourcing, evaluating international suppliers, outsourcing, financial management 
issues, relationship management, information management, and selecting international carri- 
ers. The course relies on cases to understand and solve problems in global supply chain 
management. 

TRAN-730. Transportation Planning Credit 3 (3-0) 

This course addresses the transportation planning process and related activities. Topics of spe- 
cial focus are modal classifications, data requirements, transportation demand analysis, methods 
of evaluation (GIS, cost-benefit analysis, internal rate of return, payback period, etc). Others 
are multiple criteria evaluation method, post-project evaluation, finance, transportation de- 
mand management, and issues in intelligent transportation systems. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 313 



GRADUATE FACULTY 

School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences 

Department: Agribusiness, Applied Economics, and Agriscience Education 
Chair: Dr. Anthony K. Yeboah 

Kofi Adu-Nyako 3 S., University of Science and Technology; M.S., Cornell University; Ph.D., 

University of Florida, Adjunct Associate Professor 
Antoine J. Alston, B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Iowa State 

University, Associate Professor 
Marcus Comer, B.S., M.S., Tennessee State University, Ph.D., University of Missouri, Assistant 

Professor 
Godfrey C. Ejimakor, B.S., North Carolina State University; M.S., North Carolina A&T State 

University; Ph.D., Texas Tech, Associate Professor 
Benjamin Gray, B.S., M.S. North Carolina A&T State University, Ph.D., North Carolina State 

University, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Kenrett Y. Jefferson-Moore, B.S. Southern University, M.S. Alabama A&M University, Ph.D. 

Auburn University, Assistant Professor 
Daniel M. Lyons, B.S. , M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute and State University, Agricultural Extension Faculty, Administration 
Donald R. McDowell, B.S., Southern University A&M; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois, 

Professor/Associate Dean for Academic programs 
John O'Sullivan, B.A., Stanford University; M.S., Auburn University; Ph.D., University of 

California at Los Angeles, Agricultural Extension Faculty 
John P. Owens, B.S. Appalachian State University, M.S. North Carolina A&T State University, 

Adjunct Instructor 
Arthur Purcell, B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 

Urbana-Champagne, Agricultural Extension Faculty 
Richard D. Robbins, B.S., N. C. A&T State University; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State 

University, Professor 
Terrence Thomas ,B.S., University of West Indies; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., 

Louisiana State University, Adjunct Associate Professor 
Alton Thompson, B .S., North Carolina Central University; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University, 

Professor and Dean 
Anthony K . Yeboah ,B .S . , University of Science and Technology, Kumasi , Ghana; M .S . , Ph .D . , 

Iowa State University, Professor and Chairperson 
Osei- Agyeman Yeboah , B .S . , University of Science and Technology, Kumasi , Ghana, M .S . North 

Carolina A&T State University, Ph.D. University of Nebraska, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

FACULTY EMERITI 

Sidney H. Evans, B.S. Virginia State University, MA. Ph.D. Ohio State University, Professor 

Emeritus 
Arthur P. Bell, B.S. North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Ph.D., Penn State University, 

Professor Emeritus 

Department: Animal Sciences 
Interim Chair: Dr. David W. Libby 

Allen, John W., B.S., University of Georgia; M.S., Ph.D., University of North Carolina; Adjunct 
Assistant Professor 



314 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Branch, Stacy, B.S., University of Pittsburgh; DVM, Tuskegee University; Visiting Scholar 
Fultz, Doris G., B.S., Virginia Commonwealth University; B.S. , DVM, Tuskegee University; 

Associate Professor 
Hanner, Tracy L., B.S., North Carolina Central University; DVM, North Carolina State 

University;Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Libby, David W., B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Maine; Associate Professor 
McKinnie, M. Ray, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Ohio StateUniversity; 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University; Associate Dean for Cooperative Extension Program 
Willis, Willie, B.S., Fort Valley State University; M.S., Ph.D., Colorado State 

University;Professor 
Worku, Mulumebet, B.Sc, Addis Ababa University, Alemaya College of Agriculture, 

Ethiopia;M.S., Ph.D., University of Maryland, College Park; Associate Professor 

Department: Human Environment and Family Sciences 
Chair: Dr. Gladys G. Shelton 

Mohamed Ahmedna, B.S., Institute Agronomique et Veterinaire Hassan II; M.S., Ph.D., 

Louisiana State University Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Mary J. Baldwin, B.S. , M.Ed., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Cooperative 

Extension Faculty 
Thessalenueve Hinnant-Bernard, B.S., M.S., North Carolina Central University, Ph.D., Iowa 

State University, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Thelma Feaster, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.A., Case Western 

ReserveUniversity, Ph.D., The Ohio State University, Cooperative Extension Faculty 
Ipek Goktepe, B.S., University of Istanbul, M.S., Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 

AdjunctAssistant Professor 
Thurman N. Guy, B .S ., M.S ., North Carolina A&T State University, Ed.D., University of North 

Dakota, Associate Professor 
Salam A. Ibrahim, B.S., University of Mosul, M.S., University of Georgia, Ph.D., University 

of Kentucky, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Valerie J. McMillan, B .S., M.Ed, South Carolina State University; Ph.D. Iowa State University, 

Associate Professor 
Rosa Siler Purcell, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.Ed., Ph. D., University of 

Illinois, Associate Professor 
Geraldine Ray, B.S. , North Carolina A&T State University; M.Ed., University of North Carolina 

Greensboro, Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Associate Professor 
Shirley Rouse McNeill, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.Ed., North Carolina 

State, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Cooperative Extension Faculty 
Lizette Sanchez-Lugo, B.S., University of Puerto Rico, M.P.H., University of Puerto Rico, 

M.S., Wake Forest University, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Assistant 

Professor 
Chung W. Seo, B.S., M.S., Korea University, Ph.D., Florida State University, Professor 
Gladys G. Shelton, B.S., North Carolina Central University, M.S., Cornell University, Ph.D., 

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Associate Professor and Chairperson 
Claudette Smith, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University, M.S., Ph.D., The Ohio State 

University, Cooperative Extension Faculty 
Ellen Smoak, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Cooperative 

Extension Faculty 
Sheilda Sutton, B.S. , North Carolina Central University, M.S., North Carolina State University, 

Cooperative Extension Faculty 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 315 



Carolyn S. Turner, B.S., M.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Ph.D., Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute and State University, Associate Professor 
Wilda Wade, B.S., M.S., R.D., North Carolina A&T State University, Ph.D., University of 

North Carolina at Greensboro, Cooperative Extension Faculty 
Jane Walker, B.S., Appalachian State University; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State 

University; Ph.D., The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Associate Professor 

FACULTY EMERITI 

Harold E. Mazyck, B.S., South Carolina State College, M.A., New York University, Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Professor Emeritus 

Department: Natural Resources and Environmental Design 
Chair: Dr.G.B.Reddy 

M.R. Reddy, B.S., Osmania University; M.S., A.P.A.U. (India); Ph.D., University of Georgia; 

Professor, Graduate Program Coordinator 
GA. Gayle, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Ph.D., N.C. State University; 

Professor 
M. Kamp-Glass, B.S., Texas Tech University; M.S., Ph.D., Texas A&M University; Professor 
O. Isikhuemhen, B.S., M.S., University of Benin, Nigeria; Ph.D. Institute of Microbiology, 

Prague, Czech Republic, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
C. Neidziela, B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., West Virginia University; Ph.D., North 

Carolina State University, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
C.W. Raczkowski, B.S., M.S., Kansas State University; Ph.D., N.C. State University; Adjunct 

Associate Professor 
G.B. Reddy, B.S., M.S., A.P.A.U. (India); Ph.D., University of Georgia; Professor and Chair 
Manuel R. Reyes, B.S., University of the Philippines at Los Banos; M. Phil., Cranfield Institute 

of Technology, England; Ph.D., Louisiana State University; Associate Professor 
A. Shahbazi, B.S., University of Tabriz; M.S., University of California, Davis; Ph.D., 

Pennsylvania State University; Associate Professor 
GA. Uzochukwu, B.S., M.S., Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., University of Nebraska; 

Professor 
G. Yang, B.S., Jilin Agricultural University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln; 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Department: Biology 
Interim Chair: Dr. Mary Smith 

David W. Aldridge, B.S., University of Texas, Arlington; Ph.D., Syracuse University; Professor 
Jerry Bennett, B.S.,Tougaloo College; M.S., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Iowa State University; 

Associate Professor 
Goldie S. Byrd, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Meharry Medical College; 

Postdoctoral, Meharry Medical College; Associate Professor and Chair 
Javier Cisneros, D.V.M., Universidad Central del Ecuador; M.S., North Carolina A&T State 

University; Ph.D., North Carolina State University; Assistant Professor 
Roy Coomans , B .S . , Eckerd College ; Ph .D . , University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill ; Associate 

Professor 
Doretha B. Foushee, B.S., Shaw University; M.S., North Carolina Central University; Ph.D., 

University of Maryland at College Park; Associate Professor 

316 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Andrew G. Goliszek, B.S., University of West Florida; M.S., Ph.D., Utah State University; 

Postdoctoral, Wake Forest University; Associate Professor 
i Rita A. Hagevik, B .S ., Meredith College; M.S ., Ph.D., North Carolina State University; Assistant 

Professor 
r Thomas L. Jordan, B.A., Rockhurst College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison; 

Post-Doctoral: Washington-Seattle; Associate Professor 
Perry V. Mack, B.S., South Carolina State College; M.S., North Carolina Central University; 

Ed.D., Rutgers University; Extramural Associate, N.I.H.-Bethesda, Professor 
i Bette McKnight, B A., Barber Scotia; M.A., North Carolina Central University; Ph.D., Meharry 

Medical College; Associate Professor 
I Mary A. Smith, B.S., M.S. Morgan State University; Ph.D. Cornell University; Post-doctoral: 

Cornell University and Michigan State University. Associate Professor 
. Joseph J. Whittaker, A. B., Talladega College; Ph.D., Meharry Medical College; Post-doctoral: 

Purdue University and Washington University; Associate Professor 
James A. Williams, A.B., Talladega College; M.S., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Brown University; 

Professor 

I Department: Chemistry 

I Interim Chair: Dr. Claude N. Lamb 

Foluso Adebodun, B.S., Jersey City State College; M.S., Rutgers University; Ph.D., Rutgers 

University; Biochemistry, Associate Professor 
William Adeniyi, B. A., Hampton University; M.S., Loyola University; Ph.D., Baylor University, 

Analytical Chemistry; Associate Professor 
1 Mufeed Basti, B.S., Baath University (Horns, Syria); Ph.D., North Illinois University, Physical 

Chemistry; Associate Professor 
I Marion Franks, B.S., Clark- Atlanta University, Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State 

University. Organic Chemistry, Assistant Professor 
I Etta Gravely, B.S., Howard University; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ed.D., 

UNC-Greensboro; Associate Professor 
!' Vallie Guthrie, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.A., Fisk University; Ed.D., 

American University; Associate Professor 
Julius Harp, B.S., York College (Jamaica, NY); Ph.D., Howard University, Organic Chemistry, 

Associate Professor 
'Margaret Kanipes, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University, Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon 

University, Associate Professor 
Jothi Kumar, B.Sc, Annamalai University, Cdm., India; Ph.D., Kansas State University; 

Professor 
( Claude N. Lamb, B.S., Mount Union College; M.S., North Carolina Central University; Ph.D., 

Howard University; Organic Chemistry, Associate Professor 
IDivi Venteskateswarlu, B.S., Sri University, M.S., Kakatiya University, M.S. University of 

Hyderabad, Ph.D., North Eastern Hill University, Assistant Professor 
j Alex N. Williamson, B.S., Jackson State University; Ph.D., University of Illinois; Inorganic 

Chemistry, Associate Professor 

I Department: English 

I Interim Chair: Dr. Shirley H. Bell 

Ahmad, Anjail R. B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., University of 

Missouri-Columbia; Assistant Professor 
Bell, Shirley H. B.S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ed.D., Auburn University at 

Auburn; Associate Professor and Interim Chairperson 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 317 



Bonner, Patricia E. B.A., University of Alabama; M. A., Atlanta University; Ph.D., University 

of South Florida; Associate Professor 
Brown, Jane G. B.A., Converse College; M.A., Vanderbilt University; M.A. and Ph.D., 

University of Dallas; Associate Professor 
Garren, Samuel B. B. A., Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University; Professor 
Greene, Michael. B.A., Duke University; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University; Professor 
Kamara, Gibreel M. B.A., M.A., North Carolina A&T State University; Ed.D., Temple 

University; Associate Professor 
Kulii, Elon. B.A., Winston-Salem State University; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; 

Ph.D., Indiana University; Professor 
Levine, Robert T. B.A., Queens College of the City University of New York; M.A. and Ph.D., 

Cornell University; Professor 
Levy, Michele F. B A., George Washington University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of North 

Carolina at Chapel Hill; Professor 
Meyerson, Gregory D. B.A., Miami University of Ohio; M.A. and Ph.D., Northwestern 

University; Assistant Professor 
Nwankwo, Chimalum. B A., University of Nigeria, Nsukka; M.F.A., M.A., and Ph.D., University 

of Texas at Austin; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin; Professor 
Parker, Jeffrey D. B A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.A., North Carolina 

A&T State University; Ph.D., University of South Carolina; Associate Professor 

Department: History 

Chair: Dr. Olen Cole, Jr. 

Millicent Brown, B.A., The College of Charleston, M.Ed., The Citadel, Ph.D., Florida State 

University; Assistant Professor 
Olen Cole, Jr., B. A., M.A. , California State University at Fresno; Ph.D., University of North 

Carolina at Chapel Hill; Professor and Chair 
Margaret L. Barrett, B .S., University of Southern Mississippi; M A., Southern Illinois University; 

Ph.D., University of Missouri at Columbia; Associate Professor 
Fuabeh P. Fonge, B.A., The University of Yaounde; M.A., Georgetown University; Ph.D., 

Howard University; Associate Professor 
Karen Hornsby, B.A., California State University-Sacramento, M.A., Ph.D., Bowling Green 

State University; Assistant Professor 
Peter V. Meyers, B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D., Rutgers University; Director of 

University Honors Program and Professor 
Conchita F. Kemei, B.F.A., Xavier University; M A., Ph.D., Howard University; Professor 
Thomas E. Porter, B.A., Loyola College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Washington; Associate 

Professor 
James A. Wood, B.A., Tufts University, M. A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel 

Hill; Associate Professor 
Yunqui Zhang, B A., Qufu Normal University, M.A., Ph.D., University of Toronto; Assistant 

Professor 

Department: Mathematics 
Chair: Dr. Wilbur Smith 

Bampia Bangura, B. S., Njala University College; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; 

Ed.D., Louisiana State University; Associate Professor 
Bolindra N. Borah, B.S., Gauhat University; M.S., Ph.D., Oregon State University; Professor 
Burns, D. Shea, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Ph.D., Howard University; 

Assistant Professor 



318 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Gilbert Casterlow, Jr., B .S ., M.S ., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., The Pennsylvania 

State University; Professor 
^Mingxiang Chen, B.S., M.S., Huazhong Normal University; Ph.D., Georgia Institute of 

Technology; Assistant Professor 
| James F. Chew, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Associate Professor 
Thomas G. Clarke, B.A., Hiram College; M.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., Kent State University; 

Assistant Professor 
Dominic P. Clemence, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Ph.D., Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute and State University; Professor 
•Kathy M. Cousins-Cooper, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; M.S., 

North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., University of South Florida; Associate 

Professor 
'Kossi D. Edoh, B.S., Cap Coast University-Ghana; M.S., Ph.D., Simon Fraser University- 
Canada; Associate Professor 
Legunchim Emmanwori, B.S., West Virginia University; M.S., New Mexico Institute of 

Technology; Ph.D., North Carolina A&T State University; Assistant Professor 
'Gregory Gibson, B.A., State University of New York/College at Geneseo; M.S., Ph.D., North 

Carolina State University; Assistant Professor 
i Alexandra Kurepa, B .S., M.S., University of Zagreb, Ph.D., University of North Texas; Professor 
Robert C. Mers, A.B., University of Texas; M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., University of 

Colorado; Associate Professor 
Janis M. Oldham, B. A., University of Chicago; M.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., University of 

California-Berkeley; Associate Professor 
t Wilbur L. Smith, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University, M.S., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania 

State University; Professor 
iGuoqing Tang, B.S., M.S., Anhui University; M.S., Nanjing University of Science and 

Technology; Ph.D., Rutgers University; Professor 
Barbara Tankersley, B.S., Paine College; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., 

Ph.D., Howard University; Assistant Professor 
rParamanathan Varatharajah, B.S., University of Jaffna; M.S., Ph.D., University of Arizona; 

Associate Professor 
Giles Warrack, B.S., M.S., California State Polytechnic University, Ph.D., University of Iowa; 

Associate Professor 
Nail K. Yamaleev, M.S., Ph.D., Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology; Associate Professor 

Department: Physics 

(Chair: Dr. Solomon Bililign 

Abdellah Ahmidouch, B.S., Mohammed V. University; M.S., Joseph Fourier Grenoble I 

University; Ph.D., University of Geneva; Associate Professor 
^Solomon Bililign, B.S., M.S., Addis Ababa University; Ph.D., University of Iowa; Professor 

and Chair 
^Samuel S. Danagoulian, M.S., Yerevan State University; Ph.D., Yerevan Physics Institute; 

Associate Professor 
Ashot Gasparian, B.S., Yerevan State University, Ph.D., Yerevan Physics Institute; Associate 

Professor 
Floyd J. James, B.S., M.S., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University of N.C. at Chapel 

Hill; Associate Professor 
Abebe B. Kebede, B.S., Addis Ababa University; M. A, Ph.D., Temple University; Associate 

Professor 
Melvin Levy, Ph.D., Indiana University; Research Professor 
Ronald S. Pedroni, B. A., Jacksonville University; Ph.D., Duke University; Associate Professor 

Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 319 



Department: Sociology & Social Work /Joint Master of Social Work 
Interim Chair: Dr. Robert Davis 

Fasihuddin Ahmed, B.A., Forman Christian College; M.A., University of the Punjab; Ph.D., 

University of Chicago; Professor 
Arnold Barnes, B .A., University of Maryland Baltimore County; M.S.W., University of Maryland 

at Baltimore; Ph.D., Washington University; Assistant Professor 
Glenna Barnes, B.S.N. Boston University; M.S.W. University of Maryland; Ph.D. Indiana 

University; Assistant Professor 
Phillip Carey, B.S., Oklahoma State University; M.S., Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., 

Oklahoma State University; Professor. 
Robert Davis, B.A., Southern University; M.A., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Washington State 

University; Post-Doctoral, University of Wisconsin at Madison; Professor 
David Johnson, B.A., Hamilton College; M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Associate Professor 
Sarah V. Kirk, B. A., St. Augustine College; M.S.W., Atlanta University; M.P.H., University of 

Pittsburgh; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Professor 
Wayne Moore, B.S., East Carolina University; M.S.W., Ohio State University; Ph.D., University 

of South Carolina; Associate Professor 
Ernest Morant, B.A., Claflin College; M.S.W., New York University; Assistant Professor 
Velma Tyrance, B.S., Tuskegee University; M.S.W., Fordham University; Assistant Professor 
John Steele, B.A., Maryville College; M.S.S.W., Virginia Commonwealth University; D.S.W., 

Catholic University of America; Assistant Professor 
Elizabeth D. Watson, B.A., Columbia Union College; M.S.W., Howard University; Ph.D., 

Andrews University; Associate Professor 

ADJUNCT GRADUATE FACULTY - UNCG 

Jacalyn Claes, B.S., Western Illinois University; M.S., Western Illinois University; M.S.W., 

University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Iowa; Associate Professor. 
Susan Dennison, B.S.W., University of Detroit; M.S.W., Barry University; Associate Professor 
Elizabeth Lindsey, Diplome, University of Lyon; B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel 

Hill; M.S.W., University of Georgia; Ph.D., University of Georgia; Professor 
Carolyn Moore, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S.S.A., Case Western Reserve 

University; Lecturer 
John Rife, B.A., Hanover College; M.S.W., Indiana University; M.A., Ohio State University; 

Ph.D., Ohio State University; Professor 

School of Business and Economics 






Department: Economics and Transportation/Logistics 
Interim Chair: Dr. John A. Cole 

Abdussalam Addus, B.A., Addis Ababa University; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., 

Pennsylvania State University; Associate Professor 
Julian Benjamin, B.S., New York University; M.S., Ph.D., State University of New York at 

Buffalo; Professor 
Mark Burkey, B.S., Appalachian State University; Ph.D., Duke University; Assistant Professor 
David Chen, B.S., National Taiwan University; M.S., New Mexico State University; Ph.D., 

University of Wisconsin; Associate Professor 
Joong-Kun Cho, B.A., Korea Military Academy; M.S., U.S. Naval Postgraduate School; M.B.A., 

University of Arkansas; Ph.D., University of Arkansas; Assistant Professor 

320 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



John A. Cole, B. Comm., University of Alberta (Canada); Ph.D., University of Michigan; Visiting 

Associate Professor, Interim Chairperson 
Dong Jeong , B . A . , Teachers College , Kyung-Pook National University, Korea; MA., University 

of Hawaii; Ph.D., Wayne State University; Associate Professor 
Krishna Kasibhatla, B.A., S.K.B.R. College, India; M.A. Andhra University, India; Ph.D., 

Rutgers University; Associate Professor 
Vereda King, B.A., Johnson C. Smith University; M.B.A., North Carolina Central University; 

Ph.D., Duke University; Associate Professor 
Lawrence Morse, B. A., Oberlin College; Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Associate Professor 
Kofi Obeng, B.Sc, University of Science & Technology (Kumasi, Ghana); A.M., Ph.D., 

University of Pennsylvania; Professor 
Ryoichi Sakano, B.S., Keio University; M.B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina at 

Greensboro; Ph.D., University of Alabama; Associate Professor 
Scott Simkins, B.A., St. John's University; Ph.D., University of Iowa; Associate Professor 
Michael Simmons, B.S., Arkansas AM&N; M. A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Washington 

State University; Assistant Professor and Director, Transportation Institute 
Harry Sink, B.S., MBA, Ph.D., University of Tennessee; Associate Professor 
Hal Snarr, B.S., State University of New York; B.S., Idaho State University; Ph.D., Washington 

State University; Assistant Professor 

Department: Business Administration 
Chair: Dr. Edna J. Ragins 

Hay ward P. Andres, B.S., Southern University; M.S., University of West Florida; Ph.D., Florida 

State University; Associate Professor 
Robert J. Angell, B.S., B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.B.A., University 

of Virginia; D.B.A., Florida State University; Professor 
Chiekwe Anyansi-Archibong, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Kansas; Professor 
Rose L. Bailey, B.S.B. A., Appalachian State University, J.D., St. Mary's University School of 

Law, LL.M. in Taxation, New York University School of Law; Assistant Professor 
Sylvia S. Black, B.S., Howard University; M.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 

M.B.A., University of Kansas; Ph.D., Columbia University; Assistant Professor 
William A. Carden, B.A., University of South Alabama; M.B.A., Memphis State University; 

Ph.D., The University of Memphis; Assistant Professor 
Kathryn T. Cort, B.S. Ed., M.A., Ohio State University, M.B.A., Kent State University, Ph.D., 

Kent State University; Assistant Professor 
Kathryn E. Dobie, B.M., Wittenburg University; A.S., Dal ton College; M.B.A., University of 

Central Arkansas; Ph.D., University of Memphis; C.P.M.; Associate Professor 
Roger J. Gagnon, B.S., Boston University; M.B.A., Clark University; Ph.D., University of 

Cincinnati; Associate Professor and Director-Master of Science in Management Program 
Lawrence M. Glisson, B.S., M.A., East Carolina University; M.B.A., Ph.D., The American 

University; C.P.M., Professor 
Rhonda L. Hensley, B.S., M.B.A., James Madison University; Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth 

University; Associate Professor 
Robert L. Howard, B. A., Williams College; M.B.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., The Ohio 

State University; Associate Professor 
Alice M. Johnson, B.A., Winston-Salem State University; M.S., Winthrop University; Ph.D., 

University of Kentucky; Assistant Professor 
Olenda Johnson, B.S., M.B.A., Florida A&M University; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; 

Associate Professor 



Uncompromising Excellence :. A Blueprint for the Future 321 



Keith Jones, B.S., Northeast Missouri State University (Truman State University), M.B.A., 

Northwest Missouri State University, Ph.D., The University of Memphis; Associate 

Professor 
Wanda F. Lester, B.S., Florida A&M University, Ph.D. Florida State University; Assistant 

Professor and Assistant Dean 
Mary R. Lind, B.S., Duke University; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel 

Hill; Professor 
Thaddeus McEwen, B.S., College of Arts, Science and Technology, Jamaica; M.S., Ph.D., 

Southern Illinois University at Carbondale; Professor 
Kimberly R. McNeil, B .S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Florida State University; 

Associate Professor 
Angela K. Miles, B.A., University of Virginia; M.B.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison; 

Ph.D., Florida State University; Assistant Professor 
Shona D. Morgan, B.S., Spelman College; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State University; 

Assistant Professor 
Japhet H. Nkonge, B A., North Carolina A&T State University; M.B.A., Rutgers University; 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Professor 
Edna J. Ragins, B.S., Hampton University; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Florida State 

University; Associate Professor 
Alonzo Redmon, B.S., University of Missouri at Columbia; M.B.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Associate Professor 
Tracy D. Rishel, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Associate Professor 
Patrick Rogers, BSBA, M.B.A., Western Carolina University; Ph.D., University of Tennessee 

at Knoxville; Associate Professor 
Alice Stewart, B.B A., M.B.A., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

at Chapel Hill; Associate Professor 
Joanne M. Sulek, B.S., M.A., Wake Forest University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at 

Chapel Hill; Professor 
George S. Swan, B.A., The Ohio State University; J.D., University of Notre Dame; LL.M., 

S.J.D., University of Toronto Faculty of Law; Associate Professor 
Silvanus Udoka, B.S., Weber State University; M.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State University; 

Associate Professor 
Isaiah O. Ugboro, B.S., Utah State University; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of North Texas; 

Professor 
Hong Wang, B.S. Dalian University of Technology, M.A., The Ohio State University, Ph.D., 

The Ohio State University; Assistant Professor 
Jacqueline Williams, B.S. , Drexel University; M.B.A., University of Delaware; Ph.D., Florida 

State University; Associate Professor 

School of Education 

Department: Curriculum and Instruction 
Chair: Dr. Dorothy Leflore 

David Boger, B.S., Livingston College; M.S., New Mexico Highlands University; Ph.D., 

University of New Mexico; Professor (Elementary Education) 
Elizabeth Jane Davis, B. A., Duke University; M.Ed., University of Virginia; Ph.D., University 

of North Carolina at Greensboro; Associate Professor (Elementary Education) 
Loury Floyd, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., University of Wisconsin-La 

Crosse; Ph.D., The College of William and Mary; Assistant Professor (Special Education) 



322 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 






Anthony Graham, B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.Ed, University of 

North Carolina at Greensboro; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Assistant 

Professor (Elementary Education) 
Karen D. Guy, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.Ed., North Carolina Central 

University; Ed.D., University of North Dakota; Director of Student Teaching and 

Educational Internships; Assistant Professor (Elementary Education) 
Vivian Harding Hampton, B. A., North Carolina Central University; M.Ed., Howard University; 

Ph.D., University of Maryland; Associate Professor (Elementary Education) 
Pamela I. Hunter, B A., Livingston College; M. Ed., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; 

Ph.D., Ohio State University; Elementary Education Coordinator; Associate Professor 

(Elementary Education) 
Muktha Jost , B . A . , Madras University ; M .S . , University of Kansas ; Ph .D . , Iowa State University ; 

Assistant Professor (Instructional Technology) 
Cathy Kea, B.A., North Carolina Central University; M.S., University of Wisconsin-LaCross; 

Ph.D., University of Kansas; Associate Professor (Special Education) 
Dorothy D. Leflore, B.S., Mississippi Valley State University; M.S., University of Oregon; 

Ph.D., University of Oregon Chairperson 
Stephen McCary-Henderson , B .S . , North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University ; 

M.Ed. University of Southern Mississippi; Ph.D., Union Institute and University; Adjunct 

Assistant Professor (Mathematics) 
Larry Powers, B.S., M.Ed., Tuskegee University; Ph.D., Michigan State University; Associate 

Dean and Associate Professor 
Karen Smith-Gratto, B.A., Christopher Newport College; M.A., Ph.D., University of New 

Orleans; Associate Professor (Instructional Technology) 
Thomas J. Smith, B.A., Manchester College; M.S., Indiana University; Ph.D., University of 

South Carolina; Assistant Professor (Elementary Education) 
Dawn C. Waegerle, B A., MA. Oral Roberts University, Ed.D. College of Williams and Mary; 

Assistant Professor (Special Education) 
Simon V. Whittaker, B.S., University of Detroit Mercy, M.S., Grambling State University, Ed.D., 

Grambling State University; Assistant Professor (Instructional Technology) 
Ereka R. Williams, B.S., Fayetteville State University; M.A., Fayetteville State University; 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Assistant Professor (Elementary 

Education) 

Department: Human Development and Services 
Chair: Dr. Wyatt Kirk 

James J. Battle -B .S ., M.S ., M.S ., Ed.S , Ed.D, North Carolina A. & T State University; University 

of North Carolina at Greensboro; Nova Southeastern University: MS A Program Assistant 
Patricia D. Bethea- Whitfield, B.A., North Carolina Central University; M.Ed., University of 

North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ed .D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Associate 

Professor 
Bernadine S . Chapman, B .S ., Elizabeth City State University; MA. , Teachers College, Columbia 

University; Ed.D., Northern Illinois University; Associate Professor 
Edward Fort, B ., B .S ., M. Ed., Wayne State University; Ed.D., University of California, Berkeley; 

Professor and Chancellor Emeritus 
Brenda S. Hall, B.A., M.Ed., Shippensburg University; Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

and State University; Assistant Professor 
Wyatt D. Kirk, B.S., M.S., Ed.D., Western Michigan University; Associate Professor and 

Chairperson 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 323 



Robin G. Liles, B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.S., Ed. S., Ph.D., University 

of North Carolina at Greensboro; Assistant Professor 
David L. Lundberg, B.S., United States Air Force Academy; M.Ed., Boston University; Ph.D., 

University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Assistant Professor 
Chester F. Preyar, B.S., Miami University; M.Ed., Xavier University; Ed.S., University of 

Cincinnati; Associate Professor 
Tammy T. Webb, B.S., Coppin State College; M.S.W., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Mississippi 

State University; Assistant Professor 
Miriam L. Wagner, B.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.Ed., North Carolina 

A&T State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Assistant 

Professor 
Tyra Turner Whittaker, B.S., Xavier University of Louisiana; M.S., Xavier University of 

Louisiana; Rh.D., Southern Illinois University-Carbondale; Associate Professor 
Mary P. Williams, B. A., Winston-Salem State University; MHS,Duke University ;Ed.D, Atlanta 

University; Associate Professor. 

Department: Human Performance and Leisure Studies 
Chair: Dr. Deborah Callaway 

Deborah J. Callaway, B.S., Virginia State College; M.Ed., Virginia Commonwealth University; 

Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Associate Professor 
Yongchul Chung, B.S., Seoul National University; M.S., Ph.D., UNC-Greensboro, Assistant 

Professor 
Gloria M. Palma, B.S., University of the Philippines; M.S., Ph.D., Washington State University; 

Associate Professor 
Daniel Webb, B.S., Coppin State College; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Ohio State 

University, Assistant Professor 

College of Engineering 

Program: Chemical Engineering 

Director: Dr. Vinayak Kabadi 

Yusuf G. Adewuyi, B.S., Ohio University; M.S., Ph.D, University of Iowa; Associate Professor 
Shamsuddin Ilias, B.S., Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka; M.S., 

University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran; Ph.D., Queen s University, Canada; 

P.E.; Associate Professor 
Vinayak N. Kabadi, B .ChE, Bombay University; M.S., S.U.N.Y. at Buffalo; Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

State University; Professor 
Franklin G. King, B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., Kansas State University; M.Ed., 

Howard University; D.Sc, Stevens Institute of Technology; Professor and Chairman 
Jianzhong Lou, B.S., M.S., Zhejang University of Technology; Ph.D., University of Utah; 

Associate Professor 
Kenneth L. Roberts, B.S., M.S., Georgia Tech; Ph.D, University of South Carolina; Assistant 

Professor 
Keith A. Schimmel, B.S., Purdue University; M.S., Ph.D., Northwestern University; P.E.; 

Associate Professor 
Gary B. Tatterson, B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.S., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Ohio 

State University; P.E.; Professor 



324 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Department: Civil, Architectural, Agricultural and Environmental Engineering 
Chairperson: Dr. Peter Rojeski, Jr., P.E. 

Program: Civil and Environmental Engineering Director: Dr. Emmanuel Nzewi, P.E. 

Program: Bioenvironmental Engineering Director: Dr. Abolghasem Shahbazi 

Program: Architectural Engineering Director: Dr. Peter Rojeski, Jr., P.E. 

Peter Rojeski, Jr. , B.S., Clarkson College of Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 

(P.E.) Professor 
Emmanuel U. Nzewi, B.S., Michigan Tech. Univ.; M.S. & Ph.D., Purdue University (P.E.) 

Professor 
Abolghasem Shahbazi , B.S., University of Tabriz; M.S., University of California at Davis, 

Ph.D, Pennsylvania State University (F.E.), Professor 
Godfrey A . Gayle , B .S . , North Carolina A&T State University ; M .S . , Ph .D , N .C . State University, 

Professor 
Harmohindar Singh, B.Sc, M.Sc, Punjab University; M.S., Ph.D., Wayne State University 

(P.E .), Professor 
Shoou- Yuh Chang , B .S . , M .S . , National Taiwan University ; M .S . , University of North Carolina 

at Chapel Hill; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; (P.E.) , Professor 
M. Reza Salami, B.S., M.E., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Ph.D., 

University of Arizona (P.E.) Professor 
William Mark McGinley, B.S., M.S.C.E., Ph.D., University of Alberta (P.E.), Professor 
Miguel Picornell, B.S., Madrid Polytechnic University; M.S., Ph.D., Texas A&M University 

(P.E.), Professor 
Ronald N. Helms, B. Arch., M.S.A.E., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Ohio State University (P.E.), 

Professor 
Manuel R. Reyes, B.S., M.S., University of the Philippines at Los Banos; M. Phil., Cranfield 

Institute of Technology, England, Ph.D, Louisiana State University, Associate Professor 
Sameer A. Hamoush , B.S., University of Damascus; M.S., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., 

North Carolina State University (P.E.), Associate Professor 
Ronnie S. Bailey, B A., Howard University; M.U.P., University of Wisconsin, Associate 

Professor 
Jiann-Long Chen, B.S. National Taiwan University, M.S., Duke University, Ph.D., University 

of Cincinnati Assistant Professor. 
Stephanie Luster- Teasley, B.S., NC A&T State University, M.S., Ph.D. Michigan State 

University, Assistant Professor 
Robert Powell, B.S. , Stanford University; MArch., M.I.T., (AI A), Assistant Professor 
Peggy Fersner, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.S., Clemson University (P.E. ), Adjunct 

Associate Professor 
Richard Phillips, B.S., Iowa State University, M.S., N.C. State University; (P.E.) , Adjunct 

Associate Professor 
Taher Abu-Lebduh , B .S . & M .S . , Yarmouk University (Jordan) , Ph .D . , Louisiana State University 

(P.E.), Adjunct Associate Professor 

Department: Computer Science 
Chair: Dr. Kenneth A. Williams 

Sharon A . Brown , B .S . , M .S . , North Carolina A&T State University ; M .S . , University of Illinois ; 

Adjunct Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies 
Edward C. Carr, B.S., Wingate University; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., 

Western Carolina University; Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Edmundson Effort, B.S. NC A&T State University; M.S., NC A&T State University; Adjunct 

Assistant Professor & System Administrator in College of Engineering 

Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 325 






Albert C . Esterline , B . A . , Lawrence University ; M .Litt . , Ph .D , University of St . Andrews ; M .S . , 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Associate Professor 
Ray Hawkins, B.S. University of Baltimore; MBA, Pace University; Adjunct Associate Professor 
Jung Hee Kim, B.S. , Korea University; M.S., Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology; Assistant 

Professor 
Yaohang Li, B.S. South China University of Technology; M.S. Florida State University; Ph.D. 

Florida State University; Assistant Professor 
Stephen V. Providence, B.A., M.S., Lehman College, CUNY; Ph.D., The City University of 

New York; Assistant Professor 
Kenneth A. Williams, B.S., M.S., Michigan Technological University; Ph.D., University of 

Minnesota; Associate Professor and Chairperson 
Jinsheng Xu, B.S., Nanjing University; M.S., Beijing University; Ph.D., Michigan State 

University; Assistant Professor 
Sung Yoon, B.S., Seoul Nation University; M.S., North Carolina A&T State University, Ph.D., 

North Carolina State University; Associate Professor 
Xiaohong Yuan, B.S., Hua Zhong University of Science and Technology; Ph.D., Institute of 

Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Ph.D., Florida Atlantic University; Assistant 

Professor 
Huiming (Anna) Yu, B.S., Xiamen University; M.S., Hefei Polytechnic University; Ph.D., 

Stevens Institute of Technology; Professor and Director of Graduate Studies 

Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering 
Chair: Dr. John C. Kelly, Jr. 

Ali Abul-Fadl, Associate Professor; B.S., M.S. and Ph.D., University of Idaho 

Marwan U. Bikdash, Associate Professor; B.S., American University of Beiruit, M.S. and Ph.D., 

Virginia Tech., Blacksburg, VA 
Eric A . Cheek , Sr. , Adjunct Associate Professor; B .S . , Carnegie Mellon , M .S . and Ph .D . , Howard 

University 
Ward J. Collis, Associate Professor; B.S. and M.S., Northwestern University; Ph.D., The Ohio 

State University 
Numan S. Dogan, Associate Professor; B.S. , Karadeniz Technical University; M.S., Polytechnic 

University of New York, Ph.D., University of Michigan 
Christopher Doss, Assistant Professor; B.S., University of South Florida, M.S. and Ph.D., North 

Carolina State University 
Corey A . Graves , Assistant Professor; B .S . , North Carolina State University, M.S., North Carolina 

A&T State University, Ph.D., North Carolina State University 
Abdollah Homaifar, Professor; B.S. and M.S., State University of New York at Stony Brook, 

Ph.D., University of Alabama-Tuscaloosa 
Shanthi N. Iyer, Professor; B .S . and M.S ., Delhi University, Ph.D., Indian Institute of Technology, 

Delhi 
John C. Kelly, Jr., Associate Professor; B.S., Ph.D., University of Delaware 
Jung H. Kim, Professor; B.S., Yonsei University, M.S. and Ph.D., North Carolina State University 
Gary L . Lebby, Professor; B .S . , M .S . , University of South Carolina, Ph .D . , Clemson University 
Clinton B. Lee, Associate Professor; B.S., California Institute of Technology; M.S., North 

Carolina A&T State University, Ph.D., North Carolina State University 
Robert Y Li, Associate Professor; B.S., Duke University, M.S., Purdue University, Ph.D., 

University of Kansas 
David E. Olson, Associate Professor; B.S., Michigan Tech., Ph.D., University of Utah 
Ali R. Osareh, Adjunct Associate Professor; B.S., University of Colorado, M.S., University of 

Missouri-Columbia, Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 

326 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



David Song, Professor; B.S., ChengDu University of Science and Technology, M.S., Chong 

Qing University, Ph.D., Tennessee Technological University 
Alvernon Walker, Associate Professor; B.S. and M.S., North Carolina A&T State University, 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University 
Chung Yu, Professor; B.S., McGill University; M.S. and Ph.D., The Ohio State University 

Department: Industrial and Systems Engineering 
Chair: Eui Park 

Salil Desia, Assistant Professor, BSIE., University of Bombay, MSIE, Ph.D., University of 

Pittsburgh 
Xiaochun Jiang, Assistant Professor, BS, East China Institute of Technology, MSIE, Nanjing 

University of Science & Technology, Ph.D., Clemson University 
Maranda McBride, Assistant Professor, BSIE, MSIE, Ph.D., North Carolina A&T State 

University 
Daniel N. Mountjoy, Assistant Professor, BS, M.SIE, Wright State University; Ph.D., North 

Carolina State University 
Celestine A . Ntuen , Professor, NCE (Mathematics/Physics) College of Education , UYO , Nigeria; 

BSIE, MSIE, Ph.D., West Virginia University 
Steve Oneyear, Adjunct Associate Professor, BS, MS, University of Wisconsin 
Eui H. Park, Chairperson/Professor, BS, Yonsei University; MBA, City University, MSIE, Ph.D., 

Mississippi State University 
Bala Ram, Professor/Professional Engineer, BS , MSIE, Indian Institute of Technology -Madras; 

Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo, Professional Engineer in NC. 
Sanjiv Sarin, Professor/Professional Engineer; BSChE, MSIE, Indian Institute of Technology - 

Delhi; Ph.D., University of New York at Buffalo, Professional Engineer in NC 
Younho Seong, Assistant Professor, BSIE, Inhwa University, MSIE, Ph.D., State University of 

New York at Buffalo 
Paul Stanfield, Assistant Professor/ Professional Engineer, BSEE, North Carolina State 

University; MBA, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; MSIE, Ph.D., North Carolina 

State University, Professional Engineer in NC 
Silvanus J. Udoka, Associate Professor, BSIE, MSIE, Ph.D., Oklahoma State University 

Department: Mechanical and Chemical Engineering 
Chair: Dr. Leonard C. Uitenham 

V. Sarma Avva, B .S ., Saugor University; DMIT, Madras Institute of Technology; M.S ., Oklahoma 

State University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; Professor Emeritus 
Suresh Chandra, B .S ., Banaras Hindu University; M.S ., University of Louisville; Ph.D., Colorado 

State University; Research Professor 
Rajinder S. Chauhan, B.S., Guru Nanak Engineering College; M.T., Indian Institute of 

Technology; Ph.D., Auburn University; Associate Professor 
William J . Craft , PE . ; B .S . , North Carolina State University ; M .S . & Ph .D . , Clemson University ; 

NIA Liaison Professor 
DeRome O. Dunn, B .S., M.S., North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute and State University; Associate Professor 
Frederick Ferguson, M.S., Kharkov State University; Ph.D., University of Maryland; Associate 

Professor and Director of NASA/CAR 
George J. Filatovs, B.S., Washington University; Ph.D., University of Missouri at Rolla; 

Professor 
Meldon Human , PE . ; B .S . , Northwestern University ; M .S . , Ph .D . , Stanford University ; Associate 

Professor 

Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 327 



Ajit D. Kelkar, B.S., Poona University; M.S., South Dakota State University; Ph.D., Old 

Dominion University; Professor 
David E. Klett, P.E.; B.S., Michigan State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Florida; Ford 

Professor 
Carolyn W. Meyers, B .S.M.E., Howard University; M.S., Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology; 

Professor and Provost 
Tony C. Min, P.E.; B.S., Chiao Tung University; M.S., Ph. D., University of Tennessee, Professor 

Emeritus 
Samuel P. Owusu-Ofori, P.E.; B.S., University of Science and Technology - Kumasi, Ghana; 

M.S., Bradley University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin at Madison; Boeing Professor 

of Manufacturing 
Devdas M. Pai, P.E.; B.S., Indian Institute of Technology, Madras; M.S., Ph.D., Arizona State 

University; Associate Professor 
Larry C. Russell Jr. B.S., M.S., PhD., North Carolina A&T University, Adjunct Assistant 

Professor 
Messiha Saad, M.S. North Carolina A&T State University; PhD., North Carolina State University, 

Assistant Professor 
Japannathan Sankar, B.E., University of Madras; M.E., Concordia University; Ph.D., Lehigh 

University; Professor 
K. N. Shivakumar; B.E., Bangalore University; M.E., Ph.D., Indian Institute of Science; Research 

Professor 
Mannur Sundaresan, PhD., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Associate 

Professor 
Leonard C. Uitenham, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University; Professor and 

Chairperson. 
Shin-Liang Wang, P.E.; B .S., National Tsing Hua University; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University; 

Professor 

School of Technology 

Department: Construction Management and Occupational Safety and Health 
Chair: Dr. David A. Dillon 

Horlin Carter, Sr., Associate Professor, B.A., Physical Education; Marshall University; M.S. 
Health & Physical Education, Occupational Safety & Health; Marshall University; Ph.D., 
Highway Traffic Safety Curriculum, Educational Administration; Michigan State University 

Chung-Suk Cho, Assistant Professor, B.S., Civil Engineering, Sung Kyun Kwan University, 
Korea; M.S. Construction Management, University of Hawaii at Manoa; Ph.D., 
Construction Engineering and Project Management, the University of Texas at Austin 

David A. Dillon, Professor and Chairperson, A.A.S., Electronics Engineering Technology, 
Durham Technical Community College; B.S., Industrial Arts Technology, Northwestern 
State University; B.S., Industrial Arts Education, Northwestern State University; M.A., 
Industrial Arts Education, University of Northern Colorado; Ed.D., Occupational Education/ 
Special Education, North Carolina State University 

Robert B. Pyle, Ph.D., Professor, B. A., Industrial Arts (Industrial Technology Concentration), 
Trenton State College; M.A., Industrial Education, (Construction Concentration), Trenton 
State College; Ph.D., Administration of Vocational-Technical Education, University of 
Pittsburgh 

Dilip T. Shah, Associate Professor, B.E., Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, 
University of Poona, India; M.S. Industrial Technology (Industrial Safety Concentration), 
Illinois State University; Ph.D., Industrial Engineering (Industrial Hygiene and Safety- 
Specialty), Texas A & M University 

328 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Musibau A. Shofoluwe, Professor, B.S. Industrial Technology/Construction, North Carolina 
A&T State University; M.S., Technology Construction Management, Pittsburgh State 
University; Doctor of Industrial Technology (DIT), Construction Management 
Specialization, University of Northern Iowa 

Syrulwa Somah, Associate Professor, A. A. in Liberal Studies, Fiorello La Guardia Community 
College, City University of New York; B .S., Occupational Safety & Health, State University 
of New York; M.S. Liberal Studies, Liberal College, University of Oklahoma; M.S. 
Healthcare Administration, School of Public Administration, Central Michigan University; 
Ph.D., Policy Studies in Environmental and Occupation Health, the Union Institute & 
University 

Department: Graphic Communication Systems and Technological Studies 
Chairperson: Dr. Cynthia Gillispie- Johnson 

Elazer J. Barnette, B.S., West Virginia State University; M.S., Ed.D., North Carolina State 

University, Professor 
Elinor Blackwell, B. S. and M.S., NC A&T State University, ABD, North Carolina State 

University, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Vincent W. Childress, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 

Associate Professor 
Robert Cobb, Jr., B .S ., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; M.S ., North Carolina 

A&T State University; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Assistant 

Professor 
Ray J. Davis, B.S. , University of Maryland Eastern Shore; M.S., Ph.D., Ohio State University, 

Professor and Associate Dean 
Dean Gilbert, B.S. and M.S. Appalachian State University, Ed.D., Clemson University, Assistant 

Professor 
Cynthia C. Gillispie- Johnson, B.S., North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., University of 

North Carolina at Greensboro; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 

Associate Professor and Chair 
Tony Graham, B.S. NC A&T State University, M.S. and Ph.D., Morgan State University, 
Arjun Kapur, B.S., M.S., Punjab University; M.E., McGill University; Ph.D., Indian Institute 

of Technology, Assistant Professor 
Devang P. Mehta, B.S., University of Bombay; M.A., DIT, University of Northern Iowa 
Craig Rhodes , B .S . , M .S . , North Carolina A&T State University ; Ph .D . , University of Wisconsin- 
Stout, Assistant Professor 

Department: Manufacturing Systems 
Interim Chair: Dr. Derrek Dunn 

Derrek B. Dunn, Associate Professor and Interim Chairperson, B.S.E.E., B.S. MATH, North 

Carolina A&T State University, M.S.E.E., M.S. MATH, Ph.D. E.E., Virginia Polytechnic 

Institute and State University 
William K. James, Associate Professor, A. A., North Iowa Area Community College, B.S. , Iowa 

State University M.A., D.I.T., University of Northern Iowa 
Alton L. Kornegay, Assistant Professor, B.S. , Savannah State University, MBA, University of 

Iowa Ph.D., Iowa State University 
Ali R. Osareh, Assistant Professor, B.S., University of Colorado-Denver, M.S., University of 

Missouri-Columbia Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 
Sheila E. Rowe, Assistant Professor, B.S., Roosevelt University, M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State 

University 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 329 



Ji Y. Shen, Associate Professor, B.S., Northwestern Polytechnic University, M.S., Nanjing 

Aeronautical University Ph.D., Old Dominion University 
Earnest L. Walker, Professor and Associate Dean, B.S., A.M. & N. College, M.S., University of 

Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University at Carbondale 

Program: Electronics, Computer, and Information Technology 

Chair: Dr. Derrek Dunn 

DeWayne Brown, Associate Professor B.S.E.E., University of South Carolina; M.S.E.E., North 

Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D. E.E., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State 

University 
Derrek Dunn, Associate Professor and Chairperson, B.S.E.E., B.S. MATH, North Carolina 

A&T State University; M.S.E.E., M.S. MATH, Ph.D. E.E., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

and State University 
Felix Edgal, Associate Professor, B.S.E.E., Nigeria University, M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. E.E., 

University of Wisconsin at Madison 
David Eromon, Assistant Professor, B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. E.E. University of Benin 
Fereshteh Fatehi, Associate Professor, B.S.E.E., Shiraz University; M.S.E.E., Ph.D. E.E., 

Montana State University 
Walter Gilmore, Assistant Professor, B.S .E.E. , M.S.E.E., Ph. D. E.E. , North Carolina A&T State 

University 
Claude Hargrove, Assistant Professor, B.S.Cp.E., B.S.E.E., M.S.Cp.E., Ph.D. B.E., North 

Carolina State University 

SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM 

Program: Leadership Studies - Doctor of Philosophy 

Director: Dr. Alexander Erwin 

Chi Anyansi-Archibong, B.S., Accounting and Business Administration; M.B.A., Business 

Administration, University of Kansas; Ph.D., Strategic Management/Business Policy, 

University of Kansas; Professor 
Antoine Alston, B.S., Agricultural Education, North Carolina A&T State University; M.S., 

Agricultural Education, North Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Agricultural 

Education, Iowa State University; Assistant Professor 
James Battle, Ed.D., Nova Southeastern University; Ed.S., University of North Carolina at 

Greensboro ; M .S . , Administration , North Carolina A&T State University ; M .S . , Counseling , 

North Carolina A&T State University; B.S., History, North Carolina A&T State University; 

Assistant Professor 
Sylvia Sloan Black, B. S., Physics, Howard University ; M. S., Computer Science, University 

of North Carolina - Chapel Hill; M.BA., Business Administration, University of Kansas; 

Ph.D., Strategic Management, Columbia University; 
Alan C. Bugbee, Jr., B.A., Comparative Religion, University of Vermont; M.A., Rehabilitation 

Counseling, George Washington University; M.S., Public Administration, George 

Washington University; Ph.D., Education Research Methodology, University of Pittsburgh; 

Assistant Dean of Assessment/Associate Professor 
David Boger, B.S., Chemistry, Livingstone College; M.S., Natural Science, New Mexico 

Highlands University; Ph.D., Curriculum and Instruction, University of New Mexico; 

Professor 



330 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Judie Bucholz, B.S., Psychology, University of Maryland; M.A., Human Relations, University 

of Oklahoma; M.A., Organization Development, The Fielding Graduate Institute; M.A., 

Technology, Kent State University; Ph.D., Human and Organizational Systems, The Fielding 

Graduate Institute; Assistant Professor 
William Carden, B A., Psychology, University of South Alabama; M.S ., Business Administration, 

Memphis State University; Ph.D., Business Administration, The University of Memphis; 

Assistant Professor 
William Craft, B.S., Physics/Applied Mathematics, N.C. State University; M.S., Engineering 

Mechanics, Clemson University; Ph.D., Engineering Mechanics, Clemons University; 

Professor 
Jane Davis-Seaver, Ph.D., Curriculum and Teaching, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; 

Associate Professor 
Derrek Dunn, B.S., Mathematics, N.C. A&T State University; B.S., Electrical Engineering, 

N.C. A&T State University; M.S., Electrical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

and State University; M.S., Mathematics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; 

Ph.D., Electrical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Associate 

Professor 
Alexander Erwin, B.A., Social Sciences Education, Livingstone College; M.A., School 

Administration/Supervision and Social Studies, Appalachian State University; Ed.S., 

Administration and Curriculum Development, Appalachian State University; Ed.D., 

Educational Administration and Curriculum/ Supervision, Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

and State University; Director, Leadership Studies/Professor 
Albert Esterline, B.A., Philosophy, Lawrence University; Ph.D., Philosophy, University of St. 

Andrews; M.S., Mathematics, University of Minnesota; Ph.D., Computer Science, 

University of Minnesota; Associate Professor 
Angela Evans-Everett, B.S., Special Education, East Carolina University; M.Ed., Special 

Education, East Carolina University; M.Ed., Educational Leadership and Policy, North 

Carolina A&T State University; Ed.S., Administration, University of North Carolina at 

Greensboro; Ed.D., Education Leadership and Cultural Foundations, University of North 

Carolina at Greensboro 
Edward Fort, B.S., Wayne State University; M.S., Wayne State University; Ph.D., Educational 

Administration/Leadership, University of California; Chancellor Emeritus, Professor 
J. Phillip Halstead, B.A., History, Florida State University; M.S., Higher Education 

Administration, Florida State University; Ph.D., Higher Education Administration, Florida 

State University 
Lorna Harris , B .S . , Nursing , N .C . A&T State University ; M .S . , Public Health Nursing/ Education , 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ph.D., Public Administration/ Public Policy 

Analysis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Professor 
Karen Hornsby, B.A., Philosophy, Humanities, Religious Studies, California State University; 

M.A., Applied Philosophy, Bowling Green State University; Ph.D., Applied Philosophy, 

Bowling Green State University; Assistant Professor 
William James, Ph.D. Industrial Technology, University of Northern Iowa; Associate Professor 
Xiaochun Jiang, B.S., Mechanical Engineering, East China Institute of Technology; M.S., 

Manufacturing Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology; Assistant 

Professor 
Olenda Johnson, B.S., Business Administration/Marketing, Florida A&M University; M.B.A., 

Finance, Florida A&M University; Ph.D., Organizational Behavior, University of Pittsburgh; 

Associate Professor 
Jung Kim , B .S . , Electronics Engineering , Yonsei University ; M .S . , Electrical Engineering , North 

Carolina State University; Ph.D., Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina 

State University; Professor 

Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 33 1 



Wyatt D. Kirk, B.S., M.S., Ed. D., Western Michigan University; Professor and Chairperson 
John Martin, B.S., Biology/Science Education, Warren Wilson College; M.S., Technology 

Education, West Virginia University; Ph.D., Technology Education/Resource Management, 

West Virginia University; Assistant Professor 
Laura McQueen, Ph.D., Curriculum and Instruction/Education/ Leadership and Cultural Studies, 

University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Assistant Professor 
Daniel Mountjoy, B.S., Systems Engineering/Human Factors, Wright State University, M.S., 

Systems Engineering/Human Factors, Wright State University; Ph.D., Industrial 

Engineering/Ergonomics, North Carolina State University; Assistant Professor 
Celestine Ntuen, B.S., Industrial Engineering, West Virginia University; M.S., Industrial 

Engineering, West Virginia University; Ph.D., Industrial Engineering, West Virginia 

University; Professor 
Devdas Pai , B Tech , Mechanical Engineering , Indian Institute of Technology, M.S., Mechanical 

Engineering, Arizona State University; Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, Arizona State 

University; Professor 
Chester F. Preyar, B.S., Secondary Education, Miami University; M.Ed., Educational 

Administration, Xavier University; Ed.D., Educational Administration and Social 

Psychology, University of Cincinnati 
Edna Ragins, B.S., Business Administration/Management, Hampton University; M.S., 

Marketing, University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Business Administration/Marketing and 

Communications, Florida State University; Associate Professor 
Judy Rashid, B .S ., Psychology, North Carolina A&T State University; M.S ., Educational Media, 

North Carolina A&T State University; Ed.D., Higher Education Administration, North 

Carolina State University 
Younho Seong, B.S., Industrial Engineering, Inha University; M.S., Industrial Engineering, 

Inha University; M.S., Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan; 

Ph.D., Industrial Engineering, S. University of New York; Assistant Professor 
Paul Stanfield, B.S., Electrical Engineering, North Carolina State University; M.B A., Business 

Administration, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.S., Industrial Engineering/ 

Operations Research, North Carolina State University; Ph.D., Industrial Engineering, North 

Carolina State University; Assistant Professor 
James Steele, B.A., Morgan State; M.A., Political Science, Atlanta University; Ph.D., Political 

Science, Atlanta University; Associate Professor 
Silvanus Udoka, B.S., Manufacturing Engineering Technology, Weber State University; M.S., 

Industrial Engineering and Management, Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., Industrial 

Engineering and Management, Oklahoma State University; Associate Professor 
Isaiah Ugboro, B.S., Finance, Utah State University; M.BA., Administrative Management, 

University of North Texas; Ph.D., Business Administration, University of North Texas; 

Professor 
Miriam Wagner, B.A., English Literature, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; B.A., 

Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.S., School Counseling, North 

Carolina A&T State University; M.S., Human Development, North Carolina A&T State 

University; Ph.D., Community Counseling, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; 

Associate Professor 
Elizabeth Darby Watson, B.S., Psychology, Columbia Union College; M.S., Social Work, 

Howard University; Ph.D., Leadership, Andrews University School of Education 
Lea E. Williams, B.A., Elementary Education, Kentucky State University; M.S., Curriculum 

and Instruction, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; M.A., Educational Systems Computer 

Specialist, Columbia University; Ed.D., Higher and Adult Education, Columbia University- 
Teachers College 



332 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



ADMINISTRATION, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

University of North Carolina 

(Sixteen Constituent Institutions) 

Officers of Administration 

Molly Corbett Broad, President 

Gretchen M. Bataille, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Alan R. Mabe, Vice President for Academic Planning 

Jeffrey R. Davies, Vice President for Finance 

Robyn R. Render, Vice President for Information Resources and Chief Information Officer 

Leslie J. Winner, Vice President and General Counsel 

Russ Lea, Vice President for Research and Sponsored Programs 

Cynthia J. Lawson, Vice President for Communications and Strategy Development 

Wayne McDevitt, Senior Vice President for University Affairs 

Bart Corgnati, Secretary of the University 

Richard Thompson, Vice President for University-School Programs 

Board of Governors 
The University of North Carolina 

James Bradley Wilson, Chairperson 



Class of 2005 



Bradley T. Adcock 
G.IrvinAldridge 
James G. Babb 
Anne W. Cates 



John FA .V.Cecil 
Bert Collins 
Ray S. Farris 
Dudley E. Flood 



Hannah D. Gage 
Willie J. Gilchrist 
H. Frank Grainger 
Charles H. Mercer, Jr. 



Jim W.Phillips, Jr. 
J. Craig Souza 
Robert F. Warwick 
J. Bradley Wilson 



Brent D. Barringer 

J. Addison Bell 

R. Steve Bowden 

F. Edward Broadwell, Jr. 



Class of 2007 

William L. Bums, Jr. Adelaide Daniels Key 
John W. Davis III Leroy Lail 

Peter D. Hans Charles S . Norwood 

Peter Keber Cary C. Owen 

Emeritus Member 

James E. Holshouser Jr. 
Benjamin S. Ruffin 



Patsy B . Perry 
Gladys Ashe Robinson 
Estelle "Bunny" Sanders 
Priscilla P. Taylor 



Ex Officio Member 

Amanda M. Devore 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



333 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

2005-2007 

Mr. John J. Becton 

Mrs. Carole Bruce 

Mr. D. Hayes Clement 

Ms. Eunice M. Dudley 

Mr. Henry H. Isaacson 

Mr. Albert Lineberry, Jr. 

Dr. Franklin E. McCain 

Dr. Velma R. Speight-Buford 

Mr. Michael L. Suggs 

Dr. Melvin C. Swann, Jr. 

Mr. Steven C. Watson 

Mr. Joseph A. Williams 

Ex Officio Member 

President, Student Government Association 



POLICY GOVERNING PROGRAMS AND COURSE OFFERINGS 

All provisions, regulations, degree programs, course listings, etc., in effect when this cata- 
logue went to press are subject to revision by the appropriate governing bodies of North Caro- 
lina Agricultural and Technical State University. Such changes will not affect the graduation 
requirements of students who enroll under the provisions of this catalogue. 

Piedmont Independent College Association of North Carolina 

The Piedmont Independent College Association of North Carolina is an organization com- 
prised of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, The University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro, High Point College, Greensboro College, Bennett College, Guilford 
College, and Guilford Technical Community College. The organization promotes interinstitu- 
tional cooperation and cooperative educational activities among the seven institutions. Agree- 
ments provide the opportunity for any student to enroll at another institution for a course or 
courses not offered on one's home campus. 



334 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



RESOURCES AND STUDENT SERVICES 

Office of Development and University Relations 

The Division of Development and University Relations encompasses the program areas of 
Development, University Relations, Alumni Affairs, Advancement Services, the University 
Foundation and other administrative functions related to overall institutional advancement and 
marketing. In addition, the office aids in conducting the affairs of the North Carolina A&T 
University Foundation, Inc., which has been established to assist in soliciting gifts, grants and 
contributions from public and private sources for such worthy purposes as student scholar- 
ships, faculty development, library resources, specialized equipment and cultural and public 
service programs. 

It is the mission of the Division to build, maintain and expand relationships of the Univer- 
sity with its many publics for purposes of increasing both the financial and human resources of 
the University; to cultivate the goodwill of the University's many publics; and to market the 
University, its programs and services to their best possible advantages. The Development of- 
fices and Alumni Affairs are located in Suite 400 of the Dowdy Administration Building. The 
University Relations department is located in the Garret House on Nocho Street next to Murphy 
Hall; the Foundation is located in 172 Aggie Suites off of Benbow Street 

Division of Research 

The Division of Research administers and manages research and sponsored programs as 
well as intellectual property for the University. Headed by the Vice Chancellor for Research, 
the Division's organizational structure consists of the Office of Research Services, Office of 
Sponsored Programs, Office of Technology Transfer and Commercialization, and Office of 
Research Computing. The Vice Chancellor is responsible also for managing research centers 
and institutes, including the Edward B. Fort Interdisciplinary Research Center (IRC), a dedi- 
cated research facility that supports multidisciplinary applied research through specialized labo- 
ratories. The Division serves as a major service unit for the entire University and delivers the 
following: dissemination of funding opportunity information, program design and develop- 
ment support, administrative liaison for external agencies, technical assistance with agency 
guidelines and regulations, training in proposal development and project management, market- 
ing of research capabilities, negotiation of agreements, assurance of research compliance, imple- 
mentation of electronic research administration, support of research centers and institutes, 
maintenance of a repository of sponsored program information, and management of intellec- 
tual property. The Division develops and implements policies, procedures, and administrative 
support systems for research and other sponsored programs. 

Food Services 

The University provides food services for students at a reasonable cost. Several snack bar 
options are located in the Memorial Student Union Building. Students who live in the resi- 
dence halls are required to purchase a meal plan; several options are available (minimum 10/ 
week). Students who live off campus may also purchase meals or a meal plan. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 335 



HOUSING AND RESIDENCE LIFE 

http://www.ncat.edu/~housing/ 

Administering to the physical environmental needs, along with the personal, educational 
and cultural development of over 4,200 residents, Housing and Residence Life support stu- 
dents' academic success. The Department strives to achieve this goal through the maintenance 
of comfortable, clean and safe living and learning environments, coupled with developing part- 
nerships with other entities that attend to the critical thinking, problem-solving, and commu- 
nity and civic responsibility perspectives and understandings of students. 

Office of Career Services 

The mission of the Office of Career Services (OCS) of North Carolina Agricultural and 
Technical State University is to provide centralized, comprehensive and progressive programs, 
services, and resources in preparing students to achieve meaningful and successful career 
development. Continuous career development assistance is also available to alumni of the 
University. 

Career Services is customer focused and centralizes the functions of off-campus student 
employment (full-time employment, summer jobs, internships, cooperative education, parttime 
employment, post- graduation employment) and career counseling. Students and employers are 
given professional and competent assistance to reach their specific employment needs. Ser- 
vices of the Office include the following: 

• Act as liaison between students and employers, acquainting them with career oppor- 
tunities. 

• Work with academic deans, faculty members and administrators to help bridge the 
gap between the classroom and the world of work. 

• Assist students through individual and group counseling. 

• Help students and alumni in identifying career search strategies. 

• Provide cooperative education experiences. 

Services are always performed with a conscientious and sincere interest in the students as 
well as the prospective employers. 

The Office of Career Services is located in Room 101 , Murphy Hall. Its website can be 
accessed at http://www.careerserv.ncat.edu. 

Student Organizations and Activities 

The University provides a well-balanced program of activities for moral, spiritual, cul- 
tural, and physical development of the students. Religious, cultural, social, and recreational 
activities are sponsored by various committees, departments, and organizations of the Univer- 
sity. Outstanding artists, lecturers, and dramatic productions are brought to the campus. 

A listing of student organizations, their purposes, objectives, chief officers, and advisors is 
published annually by the Office of Student Development. This information is also online at 
http://www.ncat .edu/~studev/ . 

Memorial Student Union 

http://www.ncat.edu/~memorial 

The Memorial Union functions as the "community center" for the University and its con- 
stituency by providing a diversity of services and activities. The "Union" building encompasses 
over 60,000 square feet of space and serves as the headquarters for the Student Government 
Association, the Student Union Advisoiy Board, Campus Ministries/A&T Fellowship Gospel 



336 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Choir, Office of Student Activities, Aggie Escort Service, the Yearbook Office, computer lab and 
the Commuter Student Center. Additionally, the Memorial Student Union offers room accom- 
modations for small group meetings or large banquet activities, lounge areas, self-service vend- 
ing, the "Aggie Sit-In" food court, a game room, convenience store, and the Information Center. 
A primary goal of the Memorial Student Union is to promote an involved community 
through it's various services, facilities, and programs. The Union's location, in the heart of the 
north campus, provides a co-curricular community for students, faculty members, alumni, and 
guests served by the University. The programming and recreational activities of the Student 
Union Advisory Board have a unique focus on the cultural and social development of the stu- 
dent community. 

Veterans' Affairs and Disability Support Services 

North Carolina A&T State University is an approved University for veterans and veteran 
dependents who wish to attend and receive educational benefits. 

Persons wishing to attend the University under the Veterans' Administration Educational 
Training Program should apply to the Veterans' Administration for a Certificate of Eligibility. 
Simultaneously, they should apply for admission to North Carolina A&T State University through 
normal admissions procedures. The issuing of a Certificate of Eligibility by the Veterans' Ad- 
ministration does not automatically assure a student of admission to the University. The stu- 
dent must be admitted in a non-provisional status. 

The office is located in Suite 005, Murphy Hall, and has been established to assist veterans 
with enrollment and adjustment to college life. Upon enrolling at the University, veterans or 
eligible persons should report to the Office of Veterans' Affairs for certification. If a Certificate 
of Eligibility has not been issued, the veteran or eligible persons should see the University 
Certifying Official. 

Disability Support Services 

The Office of Disability Support Services is established to assure ready accessibility of all 
academic programs, services, and activities, to any person with a disability matriculating at the 
University. Likewise, it focuses on facility accessibility. 

The Office serves as a liaison for all students with disabilities as they participate in pro- 
grams and activities enjoyed by all students. Additionally, the office arranges for any needed 
academic adjustments and/or reasonable accommodations. Current documentation is required. 

All information and services for persons with disabilities are handled through this office 
located in Suite 005, Murphy Hall. Students are encouraged to take advantage of these ser- 
vices. 

Minority Affairs 

The Office of Minority Student Affairs was created in order to assist minority (Native and 
Asian American, Caucasian and Hispanic/Latino) students in the development and accomplish- 
ment of their educational goals . Housed in Suite 2 1 9 of the Memorial Union , Minority Student 
Affairs is open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and is staffed by the director and secretary. 

Minority students represent approximately twelve percent (12%) of the student popula- 
tion. This means about 850 minority students are enrolled at North Carolina Agricultural and 
Technical State University. Efforts to serve these students are designed to increase the retention 
and graduation of minority presence students through activities, newsletters, workshops, 
mentoring programs, surveys, counseling, and numerous program outreach services that focus 
on personal development and campus involvement. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 337 






The Minority Student Association offers leadership opportunities and social activities for 
minority students, often in cooperation with other campus organizations. 

Bookstore 

The Bookstore is responsible for selling and distributing textbooks, study aids, student 
supplies, departmental supplies, and souvenirs to the students, faculty, and staff. The bookstore 
is located in the Brown Hall. The telephone number is 336-334-7593. 

Student Development Services 

The Division of Student Affairs shoulders the major responsibility for Student Develop- 
ment Services. The Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs is the Chief Administrative Officer. 
The division is comprised of fourteen departments assigned to four major units that are super- 
vised by the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Development, Assistant Vice Chancellor for 
Career Services, Associate Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, and Director of Housing. 

Student Development Services at the University are organized for the purpose of providing 
programs and services that complement the academic mission of the University and contribute 
to the intellectual, social, moral, cultural, and physical development of students. These programs 
and services are designed to meet the expressed out-of-classroom needs of students while they 
pursue academic careers at the University. 

As a support unit to the academic process, Student Affairs works with students in areas of 
counseling, leadership development, housing, and student activities. Such activities assist stu- 
dents in finding a sense of belonging, responsibility, and achievement. The Division carries out 
its purpose through goals given below: 

1. To provide leadership development opportunities for student leaders, Student Gov- 
ernment Association, Student Union Advisory Board, and other student organizations 
such as sororities and fraternities. 

2 . To provide improved services for students that impact upon their personal development. 

3 . To develop activities and programs that accommodate the special needs of commuter 
and adult students. 

4. To provide programs to accommodate the special needs of minority students. 

Consistent with the overall goals of the University, Student Development Services include 
the following programs and activities: (1) Counseling Services, (2) Career Services, (3) Stu- 
dent Government Association, (4) Student Activities and Publications, (5) Health Services, (6) 
Intramural Sports, (7) Veterans and Disabilities Support Services (8) Student Support Services, 
(9) Housing and Residence Life, (10) Student Union, (11) International Student Affairs, (12) 
Upward Bound Program, (13) Student Development, and (14) Minority Affairs. 

Some of the specific services are described below: 

Counseling Services 

The University makes provisions for counseling, testing, and guidance for all students 
through Counseling Services, located in 108 Murphy Hall. Counseling Services conducts a 
testing program for all freshman students. The results of this program are used to assist fresh- 
men in the planning of their educational and vocational careers. The Office conducts other 
testing programs that are required or desired by the departments of the University. 

Counseling Services offers students the opportunity to discuss with a trained professional 
counselor or clinical psychologist any questions, dilemmas, needs, problems, or concerns in- 
volving educational, career, social, personal, or emotional adjustment that may occur during 
the college years. 



338 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



The following is a list of services available through Counseling Services: 

1 . Individual and group personal counseling. 

2. Academic and Career Counseling. 

3. Individual test administration and interpretation covering the areas of intelligence, 
aptitude, personality, interest, achievement, and other areas requiring special needs. 

4. University Diagnostic and Placement Testing Program for all freshmen to assist in the 
planning of their educational and vocational careers and other programs required or 
desired by departments of the University. 

5. College Level Examination Program (CLEP) for Course Credit by Examination. 

6. National Testing Program which includes administration of the Graduate Record Ex- 
aminations, National Teacher Examinations, Graduate Management Admission Test, 
Veterinary College Admissions Test, and other similar examinations. 

7. Graduate student internship training laboratory. 

8. Graduate school information and cooperation in the placement of graduates who de- 
sire to pursue graduate studies. 

9. Withdrawal exit interviews. 

10. Outreach counseling programs and activities. 

All counseling is voluntary, free of charge, private, and confidential. 



ARCHIVES 

F. D. Bluford Library 

NCA&T State University 

Greensboro, NC 27411 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 339 



DRUG AND ALCOHOL EDUCATION POLICY 



Preamble: 



The basic mission of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is to 
provide an educational environment that enhances and supports the intellectual process. The 
academic community, including students, faculty, and staff, has the collective responsibility to 
ensure that this environment is conducive to healthy intellectual growth. The illegal use of 
harmful and addictive chemical substances and the abuse of alcohol pose a threat to the educa- 
tional environment. Thus, this Drug and Alcohol Education Policy is being promulgated to 
assist members of the University community in their understanding of the harmful effects of 
illegal drugs and alcohol abuse; of the incompatibility of illegal drugs and the abuse of alcohol 
with the educational mission of the University; and of the consequences of the use, possession, 
or sale of such illegal drugs, and the abuse of alcohol, including the violation of applicable 
laws. 

Objectives: 

I. To develop an educational program that increases the University community's knowl- 
edge and competency to make informed decisions relative to the use and abuse of 
controlled substances and alcohol; and 

II. To increase those skills and attributes required to take corrective action conducive to 
the health and well being of potential drug and alcohol abusers. 

Program Components: 

There are five (5) components to this policy: 

I. Education 

II. Health Risks 

III. Rehabilitation 

IV. Sanctions 

V. Dissemination and Review. 

I. EDUCATION 

It is the intent of the Drug and Alcohol Education Policy of North Carolina A&T State 
University to ensure that all members of the University community (i.e., students, faculty, 
administrators, and other employees) are aware that the use, sale, and/or possession of 
illegal drugs and the abuse of alcohol are incompatible with the goals of the University. 
Moreover, each person should be aware that the use, sale, or possession of illegal drugs 
and the abuse of alcohol is, as more specifically set forth later in this policy, subject to 
specific sanctions and penalties. 

Each member of the University family is reminded that in addition to being subject to 
University regulations and sanctions regarding illegal drugs and the abuse of alcohol, he/ 
she is also subject to the laws of the State and of the nation. Each individual is also re- 
minded that it is not a violation of "double jeopardy" to be subject to the terms of this 
policy as well as the provisions of the North Carolina General Statutes. For a listing of 
relevant State criminal statutes, please see Appendix A. Further questions may be directed 
to the Office of the University Attorney or the Office of Student Affairs. 



340 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 



Each member of the University community is asked to pay particular attention to the 
full consequences of the sanctions specified in this policy, as well as to the consequences 
of the North Carolina criminal law referenced above. Certain violations may jeopardize an 
individual's future as it relates to continued University enrollment or future employment 
possibilities, depending on individual circumstances. 

Further, it is a policy of the University that the educational, legal, and medical aspects 
of this issue be emphasized on an annual basis through the provision of programs and 
activities in the following areas: 

(a) Annual Drug and Alcohol Education Week - Workshops and seminars on drug abuse 
led by former drug addicts and community agencies such as MADD, SADD, and the 
Sycamore Center; 

(b) Drug and Alcohol Awareness Fair - Exhibits featuring drug and alcohol related para- 
phernalia; 

(c) Media presentations on University radio station, WNAA, emphasizing the most cur- 
rent programs with drug and alcohol education messages; 

(d) "Home for the Holidays, Don't Drink and Drive"; Drug and Alcohol Abuse Preven- 
tion Campaign; 

(e) Publication of brochure on drug education; 

(f) Continual monthly outreach programs in each residence hall. 

Although directed primarily to the student population, these educational programs shall 
also be open to participation by all categories of University employees. 

Additionally, the Staff Development Office is the designated University department 
responsible for the planning and implementation of drug and alcohol education programs 
geared toward the special needs of the faculty and staff. Among the programs to be imple- 
mented by the Staff Development Office are lunchtime seminars jointly conducted by the 
Sycamore Center, the Greensboro Police Department, and the Guilford County Mental 
Health Department. 

II. HEALTH RISKS 

Health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol are 
wideranging and varied depending on the specific substance involved and individual abuse 
pattern. These risks include, but are not limited to the following: 

1 . Physical changes which alter bodily functions such as severely increased or decreased 
cardiac output; shallow to irregular respiration; and damage to other major organs, 
such as kidney, liver and brain; 

2. Emotional and psychological changes including paranoia, depression, hostility, anxi- 
ety, mood swings, and instability; 

3 . Additional health risks could include such illnesses as AIDS-HIV infection, sexually 
transmitted diseases, severe weight loss, cancer, cirrhosis, hepatitis, shortterm memory 
loss, seizures, and deformities to unborn children; 

4. Physical and psychological dependency (addiction); and 

5. Death from overdose or continual use. 

While these health risks are broad in range, persons consuming illicit drugs and alco- 
hol will experience some, if not all, of the above symptoms. See Appendix A for a list of a 
few specific drugs and their corresponding health risks. 

III. REHABILITATION 

The University recognizes that rehabilitation is an integral part of an effective drug 
and alcohol policy. Consistent with its commitment in the areas of education and sanc- 
tions, the University intends to provide an opportunity for rehabilitation to all members of 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 341 



the University family. This commitment is evidenced through access to existing Univer- 
sity resources and is furthered by referrals to community agencies. 

Students 

The University Counseling Center and the Student Health Center are available to 
provide medical and psychological assessment of students with drug/alcohol dependency 
and drug/alcohol abuse problems. Based on the outcome of this assessment, treatment can 
be provided by either or both of these centers. If, however, the scope of the problem is 
beyond the capability of these Centers, affected students will be referred to community 
agencies such as the Guilford County Mental Health Center and Greenpoint. The cost of 
such services shall be the individual's responsibility. 

Employees 

Referrals to local community agencies will be made available to include the Guilford 
County Mental Health Center, Greenpoint, and private physicians. The cost of such ser- 
vices will be the individual's responsibility. The services of the University's Counseling 
and Health Centers are not normally utilized by faculty and staff members except in emer- 
gency situations. 

IV. SANCTIONS 

A. Illegal Drugs/Prohibited Conduct 

All members of the University community have the responsibility for being knowl- 
edgeable about and in compliance with the provisions of North Carolina Law as it 
relates to the use, possession, or sale of illegal drugs as set forth in Article 5, Chapter 
90 of the North Carolina General Statutes. Any violations of this law by members of 
the University family subjects the individual to prosecution both by the University 
disciplinary proceedings and by civil authorities. It is not a violation of "double jeop- 
ardy" to be prosecuted by both of these authorities. The University will initiate its 
own disciplinary proceedings against a student, faculty member, administrator, or 
other employee when the alleged conduct is deemed to affect the interests of the 
University. 

Penalties will be imposed by the University in compliance with procedural safe- 
guards applicable to disciplinary actions against students (see the Student Handbook), 
faculty members (see the Faculty Handbook), administrators (see the Board of Gov- 
ernors Policies Concerning Senior Administrative Officers as well as the EPA Non- 
Teaching Personnel Policies), and SPA employees (see State Personnel Commission 
Policies). 

The penalties imposed for such violations range from written warnings with pro- 
bationary status to expulsion from enrollment and discharge from employment. How- 
ever, minimum penalties that apply for each violation are listed in Appendix A. For 
additional information, direct questions to the Office of the University Attorney or 
the Office of Student Affairs. It should be noted that where the relevant sanction 
dictates a minimum of one semester suspension from employment, the regulations of 
the State Personnel Commission (as pertaining to SPA employees) do not permit sus- 
pension from employment of this duration. Thus, such sanction as applied to SPA 
employees dictates the termination of employment. 

B. Alcohol/Prohibited Conduct 
1 . Employees 

While the sale, possession, or consumption of alcoholic beverages is not ille- 
gal under state or federal law, it is, hereby, the policy of North Carolina A&T 

342 Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 






State University that the consumption of alcohol sufficient to interfere with or 
prevent otherwise normal execution of job responsibilities is improper and sub- 
jects the employee to appropriate disciplinary procedures. It is also the policy of 
North Carolina A&T State University that alcoholic beverages not be sold on 
campus. Employees violating these policies are subject to appropriate disciplin- 
ary procedures, which may range from warning and probation to dismissal con- 
sistent with the individual circumstances. 

Similarly, employees are reminded that, under N.C. Law, it is illegal to sell or 
give malt beverages, unfortified wine, fortified wine, spirituous liquor, or mixed 
beverages to anyone less than 21 years old. It is also illegal to aid and abet any 
person less than 21 years old in the purchase or possession of these alcoholic 
beverages. Employees found violating these state laws are subject to legal sanc- 
tion as well as the appropriate disciplinary procedures. 
2. Students 

Students are reminded of the following University regulations and state laws 
regarding alcoholic beverages as contained in the Student Handbook. 

1 . Students are liable for violation of State Law GS 1 8B-302 while on Univer- 
sity premises: 18B-302 Sale to or Purchase by Underage Persons 

a. Sale - It shall be unlawful for any person to 

I. Sell or give malt beverages or unfortified wine to anyone less than 
21 years old; or 

II . Sell or give fortified wine , spirituous liquor, or mixed beverages to 
anyone less than 21 years old. 

b. Purchase or Possession - It shall be unlawful for 

I. Aperson less than 21 years old to purchase, to attempt to purchase, 
or to possess malt beverages, or unfortified wine; or 

II. A person less than 21 years old to purchase, to attempt to purchase, 
or possess fortified wine, spirituous liquor, or mixed beverages. 

c. Aider and Abettor 

I. By Underage Person - Any person under the lawful age to pur- 
chase who aids or abets another in violation of subsection (a) or 
(b) of this section shall be guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by 
a fine of up to five hundred dollars ($500.00) or imprisonment for 
not more than six months, or both, at discretion of the court. 

II. By Person over Lawful Age - Any person who is over the lawful 
age to purchase who aids or abets another in violation of subsec- 
tion (a) or (b) of this section shall be guilty of a misdemeanor pun- 
ishable by a fine of up to two thousand dollars ($2,000) or 
imprisonment for not more than two years, or both, at the discre- 
tion of the court. 

2. Students are responsible for conforming to state laws pertaining to 

a. Transportation of alcoholic beverages 

b. Consumption of alcoholic beverages in public places 

c. Consumption of alcoholic beverages by students under the legal drink- 
ing age 

d. Abuses of alcoholic beverages. 

3. There will be no consumption of alcoholic beverages in a motor vehicle 
while on University property or on University streets. 

4. Consumption of alcoholic beverages is restricted to students' rooms in resi- 
dence halls, if they are of legal drinking age. 



Uncompromising Excellence: A Blueprint for the Future 343 



5 . The possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages shall not be permit- 
ted in public places; that is: lounges, game rooms, study rooms, kitchens, 
laundries, or patios. 

6. There will be no public display of alcoholic beverages. 

7. The University discourages the drinking of alcoholic beverages, and other 
abuses of alcoholic beverages. Being under the influence of alcohol is con- 
sidered a breach of conduct and students who violate these standards are 
subject to disciplinary action. 

Violations of the above regulations and laws will subject students to criminal 
prosecution as well as campus-based charges. 
C. Suspension Pending Final Disposition 

The University reserves the right through the Chancellor or his designee to sus- 
pend a student, faculty member, administrator, and other employee between the time 
of the initiation of charges and the hearing to be held. Such decision will be made 
based on whether the person's continued presence within the University community 
will constitute a clear and immediate danger or disruption to the University. In such 
circumstances, the hearing w/ill be held as promptly as possible. 

V. DISSEMINATION 

A copy of the Drug and Alcohol Education Policy will be distributed on an annual 
basis to each employee and student of the University. A distribution to all enrolled stu- 
dents will occur as a part of the registration process. The distribution to University em- 
ployees will be administered by the University Personnel Office. 

The Chancellor of the University shall ensure on a biennial basis that this policy is 
reviewed to assess its effectiveness and consistency of application of sanctions, and to 
determine the necessity for modification. This review shall be conducted by October 15 of 
every other year, beginning in 1992. 



CONCLUSION 

North Carolina A&T State University recognizes that the use of illegal drugs and the abuse 
of alcohol are national problems and that sustained efforts must be made to educate the Univer- 
sity family regarding the consequences associated with drug and alcohol abuse. The primary 
emphasis in this policy has, therefore, been on providing drug and alcohol abuse counseling 
and rehabilitation services through the various programs and activities outlined above. 

Past experience suggests that most members of the University family are law-abiding and 
will use this policy as a guide for their future behavior and as mechanism to influence their